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Full text of "Programs of study"

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ILLINO IS 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



University Calendar 



Summer Sessions 


1999 


M.n 17 


Term 1 instruction begins 


May 31 


Memorial Day (no classes) 


June 12 


reran 1 final examinations must end 


June 14 


Term 2 instruction begins 


luh 5 


Independence Day (no classes) 


lulv 12 


Instruction begins for Term 2 second half-term 


August 5, Noon 


Instruction ends 


August 5 , 1 pm 


Reading day- 


August 6-7 


Final examinations 


Fall Semester 1999 


August 25 


Instruction begins 


September 6 


Labor Day (no classes) 


November 23- 28 


Thanksgiving vacation 


November 29 


Instruction resumes 


December 10 


Instruction ends 


December 1 1 


Reading day 


December 13-18 


Final examinations 


Spring Semester 2000 


January 17 


M. L. King Day (no classes) 


January 18 


Instruction begins 


March 11-19 


Spring vacation 


March 20 


Instruction resumes 


May 3 


Instruction ends 


May 4 


Reading day 


May 5-12 


Final examinations 


May 14 


Commencement 


Summer Sessions 2000 


May 15 


Term 1 instruction begins 


May 29 


Memorial Day (no classes) 


June 10 


Term 1 final examinations must end 


Junel2 


Term 2 instruction begins 


July 4 


Independence Day (no classes) 


July 10 


Instruction begins for Term 2 second half-term 


August 3, Noon 


Instruction ends 


August 3, 1 pm 


Reading day 


August 4-5 


Final examinations 


Fall Semester 2000 


August 23 


Instruction begins 


September 4 


Labor Day (all-campus holiday) 


November 21-26 


Thanksgiving vacation 


November 27 


Instruction resumes 


December 8 


Last day of instruction 


December 9 


Reading day 


December 11-16 


Final examinations 


Spring Semester 2001 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr., Birthday (all-campus holiday) 


January 16 


Instruction begins 


March 10-18 


Spring vacation 


March 19 


Instruction resumes 


May 2 


Instruction ends 


May 3 


Reading day 


May 4-11 


Final examinations 


May 13 


Commencement 



University of Illinois administrative offices at Urbana-Champaign are 
open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to 
5:00 p.m., except on all-campus holidays whicli are indicated in the 
University Calendar. 

An information center, available to visitors to the campus, is located in 
the north entrance lobby of the Ulini Union. The center is open from 8:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Monday througli Saturday and 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 
on Sunday, when classes are in session. 

Small group information sessions about the campus are available at the 
Campus Visitor's Center in Levis Faculty Center, 919 West Illinois 
Street. Visitors are welcome between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Programs 
are at 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding 
campus holidays. 

The commitment of the University of Illinois to the most fundamental 
principles of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human 
dignity requires that decisions involving students and employees be 
based on individual merit and be free from invidious discrimination in 
all its forms. 

It is the policy of the University of Illinois not to engage in discrimi- 
nation or harassment against any person because of race, color, reli- 
gion, sex, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, disability, 
sexual orientation, unfavorable discharge from the military, or status 
as a disabled veteran or a veteran of the Vietnam era and to comply with 
all federal and state nondiscrimination, equal opportunity and affir- 
mative action laws, orders, and regulations. This nondiscrimination 
policy applies to admissions, employment, access to and treatment in 
the University programs and activities. Complaints of invidious dis- 
crimination prohibited by University policy are to be resolved within 
existing University procedures. 

For additional information or assistance on the equal opportunity, 
affirmative action, and harassment policies of the University or infor- 
mation on Title IX, ADA, and 504, please contact on the Urbana- 
Champaign campus: Larine Y. Cowan, Assistant Chancellor and Di- 
rector of Affirmative Action, 100A Swanlund Administration Build- 
ing, MC-304, 601 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820; (217) 333-0885. 

In compliance with the reporting requirements of the federal Student 
Right to Know Act, the 1995 completion or graduation rate for students 
who entered the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1991 on 
a full-time basis was 77 percent. 

Information contained herein is for informational purposes only and is 
subject to change without notice. Individual departments and units 
should be contacted for further information. Courses, faculty assign- 
ments, prerequisites, graduation or completion requirements, stan- 
dards, tuition and fees, and programs may be changed from time to 
time. Courses are not necessarily offered each semester or each year. 
The University retains the exclusive right to judge academic profi- 
ciency and rtiay decline to award any degree, certificate, or other 
evidence of successful completion of a program, curriculum, or course 
of instruction based thereupon. While some academic programs de- 
scribed herein are designed for the purposes of qualifying students for 
registration, certification, or licensure in a profession, successful comple- 
tion of any such program in no way assures registration, certification, 
or licensure by an agency other than the University of Illinois. 

Reference copies of this publication are available at Illinois public 
libraries, high schools, and community colleges. Copies of the Programs 
of Study and Courses catalogs may be purchased at or ordered by mail 
from the Illini Union Bookstore, 809 South Wright Street, Champaign, 
IL 61820. 



I^^^-ZUU I 



[ L L I N O I S 



PROGRAMS 



OF STUDY 



300 LIBRARY 
University of iHirtois 

at Urbana-Champalgn 
1408 West Gregory Drive 
Urbana, ttttnois 61801 



ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



Photograph by Don Hamerman. Printed on recycled paper. Produced by the Office of Publications and Marketing/Office of Public Affairs. 98.092. 



HOW TO USE THIS CATALOG 



This catalog provides general information about the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and detailed information about the 
undergraduate programs of study offered by eight undergraduate 
colleges, the School of Social Work, the Institute of Aviation, and the 
College of Veterinary Medicine, as well as information on graduate 
education offered at the University. Separate catalogs are published 
for the College of Law at Urbana-Champaign and for the University 
of Illinois at Chicago. There is also a separate Courses catalog, which 
gives information about all courses — both undergraduate and gradu- 
ate — that are currently available at the University as possible offer- 
ings. These catalogs are available from the addresses on the inside 
back cover. 

The catalog has four major sections. The first part provides 
information about student services, research and instructional re- 
sources, undergraduate admission, student costs, financial aid, 
precollege programs, special opportunities, the grading system and 
other regulations, graduation requirements and honors, Reserve Of- 
ficers' Training Corps, and the Council on Teacher Education. The 
second part has separate sections for each of the undergraduate 
colleges, the Institute of Aviation, and the College of Veterinary 
Medicine, which detail their curricula, special academic programs, 
specific requirements for graduation, honors programs, and other 
information. 



The graduate programs portion describes requirements and 
procedures for graduate study and gives detailed information about 
graduate degrees offered at the University. 

Persons who are unfamiliar with the University may find it 
helpful to refer first to the introductory material in the first part for 
general descriptions of the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

The final section of the catalog includes a complete faculty 
listing, appendices, and an index. 

Publications that supplement this catalog, and that are avail- 
able from the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on the 
inside back cover, are the Timetables, which list courses offered each 
term, class meetings times, registration instructions, and tuition and 
fee charges; and the Code on Campus Affairs and Handbook of Policies and 
Regidations Applying to All Students, which contains administrative, 
academic, and conduct regulations. 

Additional information about the University is available by 
telephoning the campus at (217) 333-1000 and asking the operator for 
the proper telephone number. 



5 GENERAL INTRODUCTION 

7 STUDENT SERVICES 

7 Information Services 

7 Counseling Services 

7 Financial Aid and Student Employment Services 

7 Career Services 

8 Extracurricular Activities 
8 Specialized Services 

8 Aids for Improving Academic Performance 

8 Medical and Health Services and Insurance 

9 Housing 

10 UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 

10 Requirements and Procedures 

10 Undergraduate Study Opportunities 

10 Undergraduate Enrollment Considerations 

10 Admission or Return Denied Because of Misconduct 

10 Undergraduate Admission Categories 

10 General Requirements for Admission 

11 Additional Admission Requirements 

12 Health Requirements 

12 Admission of Beginning Freshmen 

13 Admission of Transfer Applicants 

14 Returning Students 

14 Applicants for Second Bachelor's Degrees 

14 Applicants for Admission as Nondegree Students 

15 Admission to Correspondence Courses 
15 Admission to Classes as a Visitor 

15 Admission of International Students 

16 Admission to Summer Session 

17 STUDENT COSTS 

17 Student Expenses 

17 Registration Agreement 

17 Tuition and Fees 

18 Late Registration 

18 Flight Training Courses 

18 Residence Classification for Admission and Tuition 

Assessment 

18 Payment Requirement 

18 Installment Plan for Paying Tuition, Fees, 

and Housing Charges 

18 Refunds 



19 Exemptions and Waivers of Tuition and Fees 

20 1998-99 Semester Tuition and Fee Schedule, Full-time 
Students Registered on Campus 

20 1998-99 Summer Tuition and Fee Schedule, Full-time 

Students Registered on Campus 

23 Student Health Insurance 

23 FINANCIAL AID 

23 Applying for Aid 

24 Aid Notifications 

24 Sources of Financial Assistance 

25 PRECOLLEGE PROGRAMS 

25 Programs for Freshmen 

25 Programs for Transfer Students 

25 Program for Parents 

25 Additional Information 

25 SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

25 Advanced Placement Program 

27 International Baccalaureate Examinations 

27 Proficiency Examinations 

27 College-level Examination Program (CLEP) 

28 Campus Honors Program 

28 Edmund J. James Undergraduate Honors Programs 

29 Transition Program 

30 Educational Opportunities Program 
30 Services for Students with Disabilities 

30 Course Attendance by Illinois High School Students 

31 Early Admission Program 
31 Delayed Admission 

31 Concurrent Enrollment with Parkland 

31 Study Away from Campus 

3 1 GRADING SYSTEM AND OTHER REGULATIONS 

31 Grading System 

32 Classification of Students 

32 Transcripts of Academic Records 

32 Student Records Policy 

33 Falsification of Documents 
33 Placement Decisions 

33 Identification Cards 

33 Students in Debt to the University 



33 Automobiles, Motorcycles, Motor Scooters, Bicycles, and 
Mass Transit 

33 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

33 Grade-point Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 

33 Residence Requirements for Graduation 

34 General Education Requirements 

35 Foreign Language Courses 

35 Religious Foundation Courses 

35 Correspondence and Extramural Courses 

35 Theses 

35 Undergraduate Credit for Service and Education in the 
Armed Forces 

35 GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

35 University Honors 

36 College Honors 

36 RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

36 Army ROTC 

37 Naval ROTC 

38 Air Force ROTC 

39 COUNCIL ONTEACHER EDUCATION 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



44 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

46 Major in Agribusiness, Farm and Financial Management 

46 Major in Commodity, Food and Textile Marketing 

47 Major in International, Resource and Consumer Economics 

47 Dual Major in Agricultural Engineering and in Agricultural 
Engineering Sciences 

48 Major in Technical Systems Management 

50 Major in Animal Sciences 

51 Major in Crop Sciences 

53 Major in Food Science and Human Nutrition 

55 Major in Human Development and Family Studies 

56 Major in Agricultural and Environmental Communications 
and Education 

58 Major in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences 

59 Major in Forestry 

60 Major in Horticulture 

62 COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 

63 Curriculum in Community Health 

64 Curriculum in Kinesiology 

65 Curriculum in Leisure Studies 

66 Curriculum in Speech and Hearing Science 

67 Teacher Education Minor in Physical Education 

67 INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 

67 Professional Pilot Curriculum 

68 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

69 Core Curriculum 

70 Curriculum in Accountancy 

70 Curriculum in Business Administration 

71 Curriculum in Economics 

71 Curriculum in Finance 

72 COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 

74 Curriculum in Advertising 

74 Curriculum in Journalism 

74 Curriculum in Media Studies 



75 

76 
76 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Education General 

Curriculum in Early Childhood Education 



77 Curriculum Preparatory to Elementary School Teaching 

78 Curriculum Preparatory to Teaching Persons with Moderate 
and Severe Disabilities 

78 Teacher Education Minor in Adult and Continuing 
Education 

78 Approved Non-teaching Minor 

79 Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School Teaching 

79 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

86 Curriculum in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 

87 Curriculum in Agricultural Engineering 
89 Curriculum in Ceramic Engineering 

89 Curriculum in Civil and Environmental Engineering 

90 Curriculum in Computer Engineering 

92 Curriculum in Computer Science 

93 Curriculum in Electrical Engineering 

95 Curriculum in Engineering Mechanics 

96 Curriculum in Engineering Physics 

97 Curriculum in General Engineering 

100 Curriculum in Industrial Engineering 

101 Curriculum in Materials Science and Engineering 

102 Curriculum in Mechanical Engineering 

103 Curriculum in Metallurgical Engineering 

103 Curriculum in Nuclear Engineering 

104 COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

106 Undergraduate Curriculum in Architecture 

107 Curriculum in Art Education 

108 Curriculum in Crafts 

108 Curriculum in Graphic Design 

109 Curriculum in the History of Art 

109 Curriculum in Industrial Design 

110 Curriculum in Painting 

110 Curriculum in Photography 

110 Curriculum in Sculpture 

111 Curriculum in Dance 

112 Curriculum in Landscape Architecture 

113 Curricula in Music 

116 Curriculum in Music Education 

116 Curricula in Theatre 

118 Curriculum in Urban and Regional Planning 

1 19 COLLEGE OF LIBERALARTS AND SCIENCES 

126 Actuarial Science 

127 African Studies 

127 Afro- American Studies 

127 Anthropology 

128 Art History 

128 Astronomy 

129 Atmospheric Sciences 
129 Biochemistry 

129 Bioengineering 

129 Biology 

130 Biophysics 

130 Caribbean Studies 

130 Cell and Structural Biology 

130 Chemical Engineering 

131 Chemistry 

132 Cinema Studies 

133 Classics 

134 Classical Archaeology 
134 Classical Civilization 
134 Commerce/LAS 

134 Comparative Literature 

135 Computer Science 

136 Dentistry 
136 Earth Science 

136 East Asian Languages and Cultures 

136 Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution 

137 Economics 

137 Engineering/ LAS 

137 English 

139 English as an International Language 

140 Entomology 

140 Environmental Studies 

140 Finance 



140 


Foreign Languages 


141 


French 


142 


General Science 


142 


Geography 


143 


Geology 


145 


German 


147 


Gerontology 


147 


Greek 


148 


Health Information Management 


148 


Health Programs 


148 


Hebrew 


148 


History 


149 


Humanities 


151 


Individual Plans of Study (IPS) 


151 


International Studies 


152 


Italian 


152 


Jewish Culture 


152 


Latin 


153 


Latin American Studies 


154 


Latina/ Latino Studies Program 


154 


Law 


154 


Life Sciences 


160 


Linguistics 


162 


Mathematics 


163 


Mathematics and Computer Science 


164 


Medical Laboratory Sciences 


164 


Medicine 


164 


Microbiology 


164 


Music 


166 


Nursing 


166 


Nutrition and Medical Dietetics 


166 


Occupational Therapy 


166 


Pharmacy 


166 


Philosophy 


166 


Physical Science 


166 


Physical Therapy 


166 


Physics 


168 


Physiology 


168 


Plant Biology 


168 


Political Science 


169 


Portuguese 


169 


Preprofessional Programs 


173 


Psychology 


174 


Religious Studies 


175 


Rhetoric 


176 


Russian 


177 


Russian and East European Studies 


177 


Russian Language and Literature 


179 


Scandinavian 


179 


Science and Technology 


179 


Social Studies 


179 


Sociology 


179 


Spanish 


181 


Speech Communication 


182 


Statistics 


182 


Statistics and Computer Science 


183 


Veterinary Medicine 


183 


Women's Studies 



185 GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



186 RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES 

186 University Library 

186 Computing and Communications Services Office 

186 CIC Traveling Scholar Program 

186 CIC Common Market of Courses and Institutes (CMCI) 

187 International Programs and Studies 

187 Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology 

187 Biotechnology Center 

187 Survey Research Laboratory 

188 Microelectronics Laboratory 

188 National Center for Supercomputing Applications 

188 Center for the Study of Reading 

188 Center for Writing Studies 



188 RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES WITHIN 
DISCIPLINARY COLLEGES 

189 Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences 
189 Commerce and Business Administration 

189 Communications 

189 Education 

190 Engineering 

191 Fine and Applied Arts 

191 Liberal Arts and Sciences 

192 Veterinary Medicine 

192 GRADUATE STUDIES 

192 Graduate Degrees 

192 Admission and Registration 

193 Immunization Requirements 

193 Tuberculosis Control 

194 Tuition and Fees 
194 Financial Aid 

196 Graduate College Requirements 

1 98 GRADUATE COLLEGE PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

198 Accountancy 

199 Advertising 

199 Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 

200 African Studies 

200 Agricultural and Consumer Economics 

201 Agricultural Engineering 

201 American Civilization 

202 Animal Sciences 

202 Anthropology 

203 Architecture 

204 Arms Control, Disarmament, and International Security 

204 Art and Design 

205 Astronomy 

206 Atmospheric Sciences 

207 Bioengineering 

207 Biology 

208 Biophysics and Computational Biology 

208 Business Administration-M.B.A. 

209 Business Administration-M.S. and Ph.D. 

210 Cell and Structural Biology 

211 Chemical Physics 
211 Chemical Sciences 

213 Civil and Environmental Engineering 

214 Classics 

215 Cognitive Science /Artificial Intelligence 

215 Communications 

216 Community Health 

217 Comparative Literature 

217 Computational Science and Engineering 

217 Computer Science 

217 Crop Sciences 

219 Cultural Studies and Interpretive Research 

220 Dance 

220 East Asian Languages and Cultures 

221 Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution 

221 Economics 

222 Education 

224 Electrical and Computer Engineering 

225 English 

226 English as An International Language 

226 Entomology 

227 Environmental Council 

227 Finance 

228 Food Science and Human Nutrition 

228 French 

229 General Engineering 

230 Genetics Specialization 
230 Geography 

230 Geology 

231 Germanic Languages and Literatures 

232 Government and Public Affairs 

232 History 

233 Human and Community Development 



234 


Journalism 


234 


Kinesiology 


235 


Labor and Industrial Relations 


236 


Landscape Architecture 


236 


Latin American and Caribbean Studies 


237 


Law 


237 


Leisure Studies 


238 


Library and Information Science 


239 


Linguistics 


240 


Materials Science and Engineering 


240 


Mathematics 


241 


Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 


242 


Medical Scholars Program 


243 


Microbiology 


243 


Molecular and Integrative Physiology 


244 


Music 


245 


Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences 


246 


Neuroscience 


247 


Nuclear Engineering 


248 


Nutritional Sciences 


248 


Philosophy 


249 


Physics 


251 


Plant Biology 


251 


Political Science 


252 


Psychology 


252 


Regional Science Program 


253 


Religious Studies 


253 


Romance Linguistics 


253 


Russian and East European Studies 


253 


Second Language Acquisition and Teacher Education 




(SLATE) 


254 


Slavic Languages and Literatures 


255 


Social Work 


255 


Sociology 


255 


Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 


256 


Speech and Hearing Science 


257 


Speech Communication 


257 


Statistics 


258 


Theatre 


258 


Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 


259 


Urban and Regional Planning 


260 


Veterinary Medical Science 


262 


Women's Studies Program 


262 


Writing Studies 


263 


FACULTY 



27 1 APPENDIX A: RUBRIC ABBREVIATIONS USED IN 
CURRICULAR LISTINGS 

272 APPENDIX B: UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS RESIDENCY 
STATUS REGULATIONS FOR ADMISSION AND 
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENTTUITION 

275 INDEX 



GENERAL INTRODUCTION 



General Introduction 



Courses and Class Size 



The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1867 
as a state-supported, land-grant institution with a threefold mission of 
teaching, research, and public service. The University has earned a 
reputation as an institution of international stature. It is recognized for 
the high quality of its academic programs and the outstanding facili- 
ties and resources it makes available to students and faculty. Scholars 
and educators rank it among a select group of the world's great 
universities. For more information, see the University's home page on 
the World Wide Web: http://www.uiuc.edu/. 



The Campus 



Located in the adjoining cities of Champaign and Urbana (combined 
population 100,000), approximately 140 miles south of Chicago, the 
University and its surrounding communities offer a cultural and 
recreational environment ideally suited to the work of a major re- 
search institution. 

The University is a residential campus of classrooms, laboratories, 
libraries, residence halls, arid recreational and cultural facilities with 
200 major buildings on the central campus of 1,470 acres. Nearby are 
the University's 1,650-acre Willard Airport; Robert Allerton Park, the 
campus's 1,768-acre nature and conference center; and 3,600 acres of 
agricultural land. An additional 3,700 acres of farmland elsewhere in 
Illinois are used by the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Envi- 
ronmental Sciences as experimental fields. 

Nearly every facility on campus is accessible to people with 
physical disabilities, and the University's programs and services for 
people with disabilities have served as models worldwide. 



Colleges and Schools; 



Eight undergraduate colleges offer over 150 programs of study lead- 
ing to baccalaureate degrees. They are the Colleges of Agricultural, 
Consumer and Environmental Sciences; Applied Life Studies; Com- 
merce and Business Administration; Communications; Education; 
Engineering; Fine and Applied Arts; and Liberal Arts and Sciences. A 
certificate program is offered by the Institute of Aviation. 
Postbaccalaureate students study in more than 100 fields through the 
Graduate College and in professional programs through the Colleges 
of Law, Medicine, and Veterinary Medicine, the School of Social 
Work, and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. 
National surveys consistently rank the University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign among the top ten institutions in many fields of 
study, with several colleges and departments ranked among the top 
five. 



Student Body 



There are approximately 36,000 students and 10,500 faculty and staff 
members in the University community. About 26,800 undergraduates 
(54 percent male, 46 percent female), typically from every state in the 
union and about 100 foreign countries, enroll each year; 90 percent of 
the undergraduates are Illinois residents. Minority students make up 
about 25 percent of the undergraduate enrollment. 

Undergraduate education is strongly emphasized, and admis- 
sions are very competitive. The median ACT composite score of 
entering freshmen is 27, and almost 80 percent of these students 
ranked in the top 20 percent of their high school classes. The majority 
of transfer students enter the University with 3.0 grade point averages 
(A = 4.0). 

Approximately 125 freshmen are selected annually to join the 
Campus Honors Program as Chancellor's Scholars. The program 
fosters close, collaborative relationships between top students and 
distinguished faculty members through special honors sections, fac- 
ulty mentors, and summer research opportunities. 

Most und ergraduate students receive baccalaureate degrees after 
four years, and many go on to advanced study in the humanities, the 
sciences, th« social sciences, and various professional fields. Typi- 
cally, over 80 percent of the graduates who apply to law school are 
accepted, well above the national average; 65 percent of those who 
apply are accepted to medical school. 



More than 4,000 courses are available, although some may not be 
offered every semester. About 80 percent of all class sections have 
fewer than thirty students; 46 percent have fewer than twenty. 



Graduate Studies 



The Graduate College is the academic and administrative unit that has 
jurisdiction over all programs leading to advanced degrees. The 
Graduate College develops and safeguards standards of graduate 
work and promotes and assists research by faculty members and 
graduate students in all fields. See also the Graduate College Web site 
at http://www.grad.uiuc.edu/. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign enrolls approxi- 
mately 9,100 graduate students and offers advanced degrees in more 
than 100 fields of study. In addition to the master's and doctoral 
degrees offered in many disciplines, a number of departments offer 
work leading to other graduate degrees. Among these are master's 
and doctoral degrees in professional and performing arts fields and 
various master's degrees in teaching. 

Descriptions of these degrees are given in the appropriate depart- 
mental sections of the Graduate Programs section. More detailed 
descriptions of graduate programs and the requirements for the 
degrees may be obtained from the individual departments. 



Academic Calendar 



The campus has an academic calendar of two sixteen-week semesters 
and a twelve-week summer session. The fall semester begins in early 
September and ends in late December; the spring semester begins in 
mid to late January and ends in mid-May. The summer session, which 
consists of one four- week term and one eight- week term, extends from 
mid-May to early August. Classes are taught during the hours of 8:00 
a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; a few evening classes are conducted, primarily for 
graduate students. The academic calendar is located at the following 
Web address: http://www.uiuc.edu/providers/senate/calendar. 
html. 



Faculty 



Scores of faculty members are members of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Na- 
tional Academy of Engineering. Ten scientists received the National 
Medal of Science while on the faculty. Twenty-six faculty members 
have received the Presidential Young Investigators Award, estab- 
lished by Congress to support research by faculty members near the 
beginning of their academic careers. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a leading center 
for graduate education in the nation. A distinguished graduate faculty 
of approximately 2,000 members supervises and guides graduate 
students in research, scholarship, and teaching. 



Cultural Resources 



The University Library has the third largest collection of any academic 
library in the nation after Harvard and Yale, with more than 9 million 
bound volumes and nearly 17 million total items. The University 
Library includes more than thirty-eight departmental libraries across 
campus and in the main library building. See also the Web site, http: 
//www. library. uiuc.edu/default.htm. 

The University spends more than $246 million each year on 
research. In recent years, a significant amount of this support has been 
directed toward the creation and development of major centers for 
advanced research and study, including more than $100 million for 
the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. This center has 
established the University as a recognized world leader in the fields of 
supercomputing architecture, design, and applications. In 1989, 
through the generous gift from alumnus Arnold O. Beckman, the 
University formally opened the Beckman Institute, where interdisci- 
plinary research is conducted on human and artificial intelligence. 

A major center for the arts, the campus attracts dozens of nation- 
ally and internationally renowned artists each year to its widely 
acclaimed Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. Designed by Max 
Abramovitz, who also worked on New York City's Lincoln Center, 
Krannert Center has four indoor theatres and an outdoor amphithe- 
ater and is a magnificent showcase for music, theatre, opera, and 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



dance. It also houses generous rehearsal spaces and studios, and 
professional shops for scenery, costume, properties, audio, and light- 
ing production. More than 300 performances are offered each year, 
including those by the world's finest professional artists, from Itzhak 
Perlman, Jean Redpath, Chick Corea, Dee Dee Bridgewater, and the 
great international orchestras to dance and theatre companies and 
jazz, folk, and family programs. These performances complement a 
full season of productions by the Departments of Theatre and Dance 
and the School of Music. 

The Spurlock Museum, opening in 2001, will provide a new home 
for oyer 40,000 ethnographic and cultural artifacts from civilizations 
around the world and across history. Visit the Spurlock Museum 
online at www.spurlock.uiuc.edu. The Museum of Natural History (a 
division of the Spurlock Museum) currently features permanent 
exhibits on botany, biology, and geology as well as substantial and 
significant research collections numbering almost half a million speci- 
mens. The Krannert Art Museum has a diverse collection of 9,000 
objects ranging from European and American paintings to contempo- 
rary art and photography, and African, pre-Columbian, and Asian art. 
A full schedule of temporary exhibits complements the permanent 
collections. These museums and the John Philip Sousa Museum and 
Library are used for research, teaching, and enjoyment. Student work 
in architecture and related areas is exhibited in the Temple Buell 
Architecture Gallery. The newly relocated Japan House and Arbore- 
tum offers informal and formal tea rooms, stroll gardens, and an 
authentic space to experience courses in Japanese art and culture. 

The Illini Union is a common meeting place for students, faculty, 
staff, and visitors to eat, play, study, and relax. It contains cafeteria and 
dining facilities, guest rooms, an art gallery, reading and television 
rooms, billiards and electronic game rooms, bowling lanes, a ticket 
and check-cashing counter, and the alumni office. The Illini Union Art 
Gallery exhibits a broad range of contemporary art and craft objects. 

Distinguished public figures and outstanding scholars appear 
regularly on campus for symposia, lectures, forums, and public dis- 
cussions. 

WILL-TV and WILL- AM and -FM radio stations, all affiliated with 
the Public Broadcasting Service, provide a wide range of cultural 
programs to a large area of the state. 

Many concerts are given in the Music Building and Smith Music 
Hall, and films are shown on campus throughout the year. Students 
direct, produce, and act in plays presented at the Armory Free Theatre. 

The University's Intramural- Physical Education Building is one of 
the world's largest structures for university intramural sports and 
recreational facilities. This facility contains gymnasia, indoor and 
outdoor swimming pools, handball/racquetball and squash courts, 
and outdoor tennis courts. There are also weight- training rooms, 
exercise rooms, an archery range, a camping equipment and resource 
room, a games room, combatives rooms, and administrative offices. 

The Assembly Hall holds the distinction of being the world's 
second largest edge-support dome. It has a permanent seating capac- 
ity of 16,000, and is used for Big Ten basketball games, performances 
by touring companies, concerts, conventions, convocations, and other 
activities. Special events are scheduled throughout the year. 

Memorial Stadium, with a seating capacity of 70,000, is home for 
Fighting Illini football. 

Willard Airport serves commercial, general, and private aviation, 
and houses the Institute of Aviation. Located six miles southwest of 
campus, the airport is also a center for research, education, and 
military aviation. 

Recreational Facilities 

The University of Illinois is the home of one of the top collegiate 
recreational sports programs in the nation, the Division of Campus 
Recreation (DCR). All sectors of the University community can par- 
ticipate in the multifaceted recreation programs sponsored by the 
division. 

Recreational programs and services include excellent multipur- 
pose facilities, special events, outdoor recreation, sports clubs, 
intramurals, exercise and fitness programs, Ice Arena activities, and 
student leadership and employment opportunities. 

The Ice Arena, 406 East Armory, is open year-round for skating, 
hockey, broomball, skating lessons, parties, and other activities. The 
Atkins Tennis Center, an athletic recreational complex, opened in 
1991. 



Throughout the year, DCR offers diverse programs appealing to a 
wide range of interests. These special events include Fresh Starts, 
Quad Day, Sports Trivia Bowl, poolside concerts, and activities for 
children living in Orchard Downs, the University's family housing. 

Exercise and fitness programs sponsored by DCR include aerobics 
classes, water exercise, and low-impact aerobics classes. Several 
wellness programs are also offered through the SportWell Program. 

More than forty sport clubs provide a variety of activities for 
students, ranging from martial arts and scuba to rugby and ice hockey. 
Team and individual sports competitions, practice sessions, and 
tournaments with other universities are possible. 

The outdoor recreation program offers opportunities for students 
to rent camping and outdoor equipment such as tents, backpacks, and 
skis. Several clinics, weekend workshops, and extended trips to such 
areas as the Grand Canyon and the Florida Everglades are scheduled 
during the year. 

Numerous activities are available to students in the organized 
intramural sports program. Students can participate in men's, women's, 
corecreational, and graduate/faculty/staff divisions in sports rang- 
ing from flag football, soccer, and basketball to tennis, swimming, and 
wrestling. Novel sports such as in-line skating, ultimate frisbee, 
broomball, and wallyball have many enthusiastic participants. 

Students may apply for part-time employment and volunteer 
leadership opportunities at DCR. Each year more than 800 students 
work as intramural sports officials and supervisors, lifeguards, recep- 
tionists, designers, aerobic instructors, building/field supervisors, 
and intramural event managers. 

Student Activities 

One of the distinct advantages of a large university is that students 
with varying interests can find many avenues for expression. At the 
Urbana-Champaign campus, there are about 850 registered student 
organizations. 

Approximately 19 percent of undergraduate men and 22 percent 
of undergraduate women are actively affiliated with the Greek sys- 
tem, one of the largest fraternity and sorority systems in the nation 
with fifty-seven fraternities and twenty-seven sororities. 

All three branches of the armed services have Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps units on campus. 

Students have the opportunity to participate in performances by 
eleven different choral groups, five concert bands, the Marching Illini, 
three orchestras, five jazz bands, innumerable small ensembles, and 
even a Russian-style balalaika orchestra. Each year, Illinois Opera 
Theatre stages full-length operas, operettas, and opera scene pro- 
grams. Athletics provide another avenue of enjoyment outside the 
classroom. The campus intramural program is one of the largest in the 
nation, with about 75 percent of all students participating. 

The campus is a member of the Big Ten Intercollegiate Conference, 
and in recent years its athletic programs have achieved national 
stature in a number of men's and women's sports. The Fighting Illini, 
in orange and blue, field nine men's and eight women's teams each. 
Men's intercollegiate sports include baseball, basketball, cross-coun- 
try, football, golf, gymnastics, tennis, track and field,, and wrestling. 
The women's program includes basketball, cross-country, golf, gym- 
nastics, soccer, swimming /diving, tennis, track and field, and volley- 
ball. 

Campus Visitors Center 

Prospective students and their parents are invited to visit the campus 
and participate in small group information sessions at the Campus 
Visitors Center. The center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, excluding campus holidays. Presentations are made 
by staff members of the Office of Admissions and Records, and 
arrangements can be made to meet with admission counselors and 
with representatives from specific academic units, the Offices of 
Student Financial Aid, and the Housing Division. The Campus Visi- 
tors Center is located in the Levis Faculty Center, 919 West Illinois 
Street, one block west of Lincoln Avenue in Urbana. 

Student-conducted tours of the campus are available when classes 
are in session and weather permits. Reservations are recommended 
and may be made by calling the Campus Visitors Center, 
(217) 333-0824. For further information, see the Web site, 
http://www.uiuc.edu/admin2/vguide.html. 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Student Services 



INFORMATION SERVICES 



CAMPUS INFORMATION SERVICES 

Campus Information Services at the north entrance to the Illini Union 
(333-INFO) answers questions and offers information about the Uni- 
versity. If a student does not know exactly where to find help, the 
center will refer the student to the proper department. 



COUNSELING SERVICES 



COUNSELING CENTER 

The Counseling Center at 206 Turner Student Services Building (333- 
3704) is staffed by clinical and counseling psychologists, a clinical 
social worker, a paraprofessional specialist in education, a reading 
and study skills specialist, a multicultural educator, an assessment/ 
evaluation specialist, predoctoral interns, graduate assistants, and 
paraprofessionals who provide a variety of services to help students 
with psychological, educational, social, and developmental prob- 
lems. Among the services offered are workshops on specific topics 
such as identifying and referring troubled students, test anxiety, time 
management, completing dissertations, survivors of child sexual 
abuse and acquaintance rape, eating disorders and disturbances, and 
dual-career issues. Also offered are reading and study classes; indi- 
vidual, couple, and group counseling (short- and intermediate-term), 
and referral services for long-term counseling; psychological and 
emergency services; assessments for psychiatric disorders under ADA 
and for alcohol and other drug problems as part of the Alcohol and 
Drug Office; and consultative services to University departments and 
staff members. 

The Center co-sponsors the Program on Intergroup Relations, a 
diversity education program, with the Office of the Dean of Students 
as well as the Inner Voices social issues theater program with McKinley 
Health Center and the Theater Department. 

The Counseling Center has a Self -Help Information Center (SHIC) 
in the Undergraduate Library. The center sponsors student-led sup- 
port groups for a variety of issues and concerns. The center aims to be 
aware of and sensitive to both the regular and special needs of 
students of color, students with disabilities, international students, 
and gay, lesbian, and bisexual students. Fees for the services of the 
Counseling Center have been prepaid through the student health fee. 
All counseling is completely confidential. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS 

The staff in the Dean of Students Office at 300 Turner Student Services 
Building (333-0050) provides general counseling to all students. Staff 
members are available to help students cope with whatever problems 
may face them at the University, including sexual harassment, assault, 
discrimination, and grievances. A dean is available twenty-four hours 
a day to help in emergencies. Call the Emergency Dean at 333-0050 any 
time for help. 

MINORITY STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of Minority Student Affairs (MSA) at 130 Turner Student 
Services Building (phone: 333-0054; Web site: www.omsa.uiuc.edu) 
provides leadership in developing, implementing, and coordinating 
student support services and activities designed to assist minority 
students' personal development and academic achievement. Through 
several programs the department provides guidance and counseling 
support to African- American, Latino/a, Native American and other 
students in all areas relevant to their persistence and success on 
campus, including general adjustment, academic support, career 
development, and graduate school preparation. Particular emphasis 
is placed upon preparing students accepted to the University through 
the President's Award Program (PAP) or the Educational Opportuni- 
ties Program (EOP) to achieve and maintain academic excellence. 
Other University students may participate in MSA programs by 
applying to be an EOP affiliate. 

In collaboration with other Student Affairs and campus units, 
MSA promotes and develops programs for all UIUC students. MSA 
assists with educational and personal growth issues, as well as provid- 
ing preparation for post-graduation challenges. MSA-sponsored pro- 



grams include technology training, orientation programs, leadership 
retreats, career conferences, academic award programs, internship 
preparation and location activities, and cultural enrichment pro- 
grams. MSA serves as a resource for students, faculty, staff, and 
prospective students. 

MSA assists campus units and student organizations in creating 
environments and programs that will attract, support, and bolster 
minority students' success and continuation at the University through 
monitoring of students' academic progress and making appropriate 
referrals to both Student Affairs and academic units. MSA administers 
the Federal TRIO Programs, including Student Support Services, the 
Upward Bound College Prep Academy, and the Ronald E. McNair 
Scholars Institute. In addition, the department administers several 
state-assisted programs for 4,000 students annually. 

GRADUATE COLLEGE MINORITY STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE 

The Graduate College Minority Student Affairs Office coordinates 
minority graduate student recruitment, collects and disseminates 
information for prospective and current minority students, and coun- 
sels minority students who have problems with financial aid, aca- 
demic matters, race relations, or personal and social concerns. In 
addition, the office supports the activities of many campus groups 
involved with minority graduate students, including the Black Gradu- 
ate Student Association, La Casa Cultural Latina, the Bilingual 
Multicultural Education Student Association, and the African- Ameri- 
can Cultural Program. These groups, in turn, help the office in dis- 
seminating information and assisting students. For more information, 
call 333-4860. 

FINANCIAL AID AND STUDENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICES 

OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Staff members in the Office of Student Financial Aid (620 E. John, 
Student Services Arcade Building, 333-0100) provide information on 
the four main types of financial aid administered by the University: 
grants, scholarships, loans, and employment. The Student Employ- 
ment unit within the financial aid office provides assistance to all 
students, regardless of whether they have applied for financial aid. 
For a more complete description of student financial aid programs 
and employment services, visit the office online at http:// 
www.odos.uiuc.edu/osfa/. 

CAREER SERVICES 

CAREER CENTER 

The Career Center at 715 South Wright, Student Services Arcade 
Building (333-0820) offers students a wide range of career-related 
services, including individual and group counseling, assistance on job 
search efforts, choice of major, career planning, graduate and profes- 
sional school admissions strategies, and help in identifying post- 
graduate employment opportunities. The Career Library and its 
duplicate at the Undergrad Library, The Career Cluster, has occupa- 
tional literature and career profiles, job search aids, geographic career 
information, graduate and professional school descriptions and re- 
sources, and special resources to all students, regardless of major, with 
career and life planning. Each year, the Center sponsors regular and 
scheduled career seminars and workshops and responds to speaking 
requests from the student community. The office also maintains and 
administers credentials / recommendations files for students to use for 
graduate school applications. 

Health Careers provides advising and career counseling for stu- 
dents interested in dentistry, medicine, osteopathic medicine, optom- 
etry, pharmacy, podiatry, occupational therapy, physical therapy and 
other health professions. This unit of the Career Center maintains a 
complete collection of catalogs from health professional schools. A 
credentials/evaluation service is available for application to health- 
professional schools. Counselors are available on an appointment 
basis and walk in to advise students on preprofessional choices and 
help them apply to professional schools. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The Center, located on the first and second floors of the Turner Student 
Services Building (333-3704) offers workshops and individual coun- 
seling to help students with career or career-related problems in 
cooperation with the Career Center. SIGI Plus career development 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



computer program is available at the Self-Help Information Center in 
the Undergraduate Library and in the Career Library in the Student 
Services Arcade Building. 

COLLEGE PLACEMENT OFFICES 

Individual colleges and departments on campus sponsor their own 
job placement programs for majors. These offices provide advising 
and job search assistance. Each office makes arrangements for em- 
plover representatives to conduct interviews on campus. 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 



REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

This office at 280 Mini Union (333-1153) is the headquarters for 
registered student organizations. Information is available on more 
than 700 student organizations, representing a wide variety of profes- 
sional, social, recreational, cultural, athletic, and religious interests. 

ILLINI UNION BOARD 

This organization, more commonly known as IUB, provides and 
directs cultural, educational, social, and recreational programs of an 
all-campus nature. Events such as the annual Dad's Day and Mom's 
Day celebrations are coordinated by IUB, along with concerts, cultural 
programs, and lectures. IUB also sponsors the Block I football cheering 
section, Quad Cinemas, Activity Day, and the spring and fall musi- 
cals, as well as publishing the Illinibook. The IUB office is located at 284 
Illini Union (333-3660). 

SPECIALIZED SERVICES 

GRADUATE STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL 

The Graduate Student Advisory Council (GSAC) communicates the 
concerns of graduate students to the dean and staff of the Graduate 
College. Responding to the changing needs of graduate students, 
GSAC identifies and clarifies the issues and makes recommendations 
to the Graduate College. GSAC is composed of fifteen appointed 
grad ua te students, representing the range of graduate programs at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to the council 
members, each department has a graduate student who serves as a 
contact person for GSAC. Apart from GSAC, graduate student as- 
sociations are active in many departments. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of International Student Affairs (OISA) at 400 Turner 
Student Services Building provides a variety of services to interna- 
tional students at the University of Illinois, including advice and 
counsel on matters affecting their adjustments to a new academic 
system and culture. The office assists students with employment 
clearances and financial matters. It provides advice and information 
on visas and other federal regulations applying to international stu- 
dents, alien income tax returns, insurance, housing problems, English 
language problems, or personal problems. In addition, it ensures that 
a broad range of programs is offered across campus to highlight its 
international flavor. American students may get involved with the 
office through the volunteer student group called Student Diplomats. 
For further information, contact OISA at 333-1303. 

REHABILITATION EDUCATION SERVICES 

Since 1947, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has pio- 
neered in facilitating the education of students with disabilities. 
Campus facilities are among the best in the nation, and applications 
from persons with disabilities are welcomed. The Division of Reha- 
bilitation Education Services in the College of Applied Life Studies is 
responsible for planning campus facilities to ensure that all are acces- 
sible to and usable by students with disabilities. The division also 
provides a variety of services and opportunities such as early registra- 
tion, housing arrangements, transportation, prosthetic/wheelchair 
repair, physical therapy and functional training, medical services, 
counseling services, recreation and athletics, and services to the 
visually and hearing impaired. For information about graduate edu- 
cation and degree programs in rehabilitation education, with areas of 
concentration in counseling and administration, supported employ- 
ment, and rehabilitation engineering, applicants are encouraged to 
contact the director of the division at the Rehabilitation Education 
Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 South Oak 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820; (217) 333-4600. 



Prospective students with permanent disabilities are strongly 
encouraged to communicate with the division prior to enrollment to 
ascertain how their particular program can be implemented. The 
division works closely with academic units to establish the manner in 
which degree requirements can be met. 

VETERANS AFFAIRS 

The Veterans Affairs unit within the Office of Student Financial Aid 
(620 E. John, Student Services Arcade Building, 333-0100) administers 
the Montgomery G. I. Bill, the Illinois Veterans Grant, and other 
veterans educational benefits programs. 

OFFICE OF WOMEN'S PROGRAMS 

Services for students are administered at 300 Turner Student Services 
Building (333-3137). Special programs include Campus Acquaintance 
Rape Education (CARE), a Women's Resources Directory, work- 
shops, speakers, and awards presentation programs, including the 
Verdell Frazier Young awards for women who are continuing inter- 
rupted educations. Support groups focus on a number of issues 
pertinent to women, including reentry-age women students, sexual 
assault, and domestic violence. 

AIDS FOR IMPROVING ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE 



COUNSELING CENTER 

The Counseling Center at the Turner Student Services Building offers 
noncredit, nongraded classes designed to improve reading speed, 
comprehension, and general study skills. Classes are taught in small 
groups with individual instruction provided when necessary. A nomi- 
nal fee is charged. In addition, a Study Assistance Lab is available, free 
of charge, to provide students with an opportunity to receive indi- 
vidual assistance with their study-related problems. For more infor- 
mation, call 333-3704. 

RHETORIC TUTORIAL 

RHET 100 (Rhetoric Tutorial) is designed primarily as an adjunct to 
RHET 101 and 102, and is open only to students enrolled in these two 
courses. A student is placed in RHET 100 on the basis of rhetoric test 
scores. 

The tutorial meets weekly, and the student receives one semester 
hour of credit on a satisfactory /unsatisfactory basis. The tutorial is 
devoted to individual writing problems and may be repeated for a 
total of two semester hours of credit. 

MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES AND INSURANCE 

Students enrolled in credit courses and in attendance on the Urbana- 
Champaign campus are assessed separate fees that cover health 
service at the McKinley Health Center and group health insurance. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The health service fee supports the medical services available on 
campus at the McKinley Health Center, 1109 South Lincoln Avenue, 
Urbana. These services include (1) the diagnosis, treatment, and 
follow-up of acute and chronic illnesses; (2) a twenty-four-hour "dial- 
a-nurse" to advise on appropriate treatment and referral to local 
hospitals; (3) women's health services; (4) preventive medicine; (5) 
mental health care; (6) health education; and (7) fitness services at 
SportWell. In addition, many diagnostic tests are available, including 
laboratory procedures and radiologic examinations. A pharmacy 
provides most medications when they are prescribed by a McKinley 
Health Center physician. 

All of these services are available at no additional cost to students 
who have paid the health service fee. Dependents are not eligible for 
care at the health center unless they are also enrolled students at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. McKinley Health Center is fully accred- 
ited as an ambulatory health-care facility by the Joint Commission on 
Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. For further information 
about the McKinley Health Center, call 333-2701. (See the Student 
Health Insurance section for information about health care coverage 
off-campus or when McKinley is closed.) 

GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE 

Insured students may extend coverage for themselves and their 
dependents for a limited period following graduation or withdrawal 
from school. This must be done before they leave campus; it cannot be 



STUDENT SERVICES 



done by mail. The Student Insurance Office will provide information 
on procedures and deadlines. 

Students who present evidence of continuing equivalent medical 
insurance coverage may be exempted from paying the fee for the 
University insurance if they submit a petition to the Student Insurance 
Office during the period provided for the exemption of fees and if it is 
approved. Once the student is declared exempt, the exemption is 
continuous. 

Students may request that they be reinstated at any time during a 
term; however, reentry into the insurance program is subject to 
approval of a medical history. If approved, coverage is effective on the 
date of the application. There is no prorated premium. 

HOUSING 

Housing for students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Cham- 
paign is provided in University residence halls, fraternities, sororities, 
private residence halls, and houses. 

Present regulations require all single undergraduate men and 
women students to live for the entire academic year in housing that is 
certified by the University, unless the student reaches the age of 
twenty-one or achieves 30 semester hours of earned academic credit 
by August 15 of the academic year. 

Housing that is certified includes University residence halls, fra- 
ternities and sororities, and privately owned housing that meets 
University standards. Within this system, there is a wide range of 
facilities, rates, and services offered. 

Information about housing is presented in greater detail in a 
brochure mailed to each undergraduate student with the Notice of 
Admission to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

UNIVERSITY RESIDENCE HALLS 

Approximately 8,800 men and women live in twenty-two University 
residence halls. Any single undergraduate student qualified to enter 
the University may apply for residence hall accommodations. Room 
assignments are made in accordance with the University of Illinois 
policy on nondiscrimination. 

University residence halls are located at points convenient to most 
areas of the main campus. Individual halls accommodate from 151 to 
658 students, largely in double rooms. Undergraduate residence hall 
students are required to select a meal plan; four plans are available. 

A University residence hall contract is sent to each undergraduate 
student who is accepted for admission. For more information, call 
(217) 333-7111 or e-mail housing@uiuc.edu. 

PRIVATELY OWNED CERTIFIED HOUSING 

Privately owned residence halls, ranging from large, coeducational 
room-and-board halls to smaller, supervised suite-living arrange- 
ments, are available. Smaller clusters of students live in other facilities 
offering a room-only or a room-with-kitchen-privileges option. All 
are within the campus community. 

A descriptive list of these facilities is available from the staff in the 
Housing Information Office, 400 Clark Hall, 1203 South Fourth Street, 
Champaign, IL 61820 by writing or visiting the office, or by calling 
(217) 333-1420. 

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

The Greek community consists of 58 fraternities and 31 sororities, 
representing nearly 5,400 undergraduate members and is the largest 
Greek system in the country. These are social organizations that offer 
leadership, scholarship, service, and most importantly, friendship. A 
student becomes a member of a sorority or fraternity by participating 
in recruitment activities, also known as rush or intake, and accepting 
a bid or invitation. The recruitment processes are occasions for a 
student to meet sorority and fraternity members in the organizations 
and learn if they share common interests. The Greek community offers 
many opportunities for involvement. These include leadership posi- 
tions within the organization which range from being the chair of a 
community service project to being the treasurer of a $250, 000 annual 
operating budget. In addition to these opportunities, members are 
involved in activities outside of their sorority or fraternity, including 
student government, student programming boards, and athletics. 

Forty-five fraternities and twenty sororities have their own chap- 
ter houses which are part of the University's Certified Housing 
system, meaning they are inspected for fire and health safety codes. 
Nearly all chapters have a live-in requirement of one year, and the 
average number of occupants in a house is fifty members. Typically, 



a student would move into the chapter house the year after they join 
the chapter. Costs for room and board vary from chapter to chapter; 
however, when dues are added to the total bill, costs to be a member 
and live in a chapter house can be less than paying membership dues 
and living in other housing facilities. Questions regarding fraternity 
and sorority membership can be directed to the Office of the Dean of 
Student Affairs, 333-7062. 

HOUSING FOR STUDENT FAMILIES 

There are approximately 1,000 University-owned apartments, some 
of which are available to undergraduate student families. There is also 
a variety of privately owned housing facilities in the community. An 
application for University-owned apartments can be obtained by 
writing to the Family Housing Office, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 1841 Orchard Place, Urbana, IL 61801. 

A listing of privately owned furnished and unfurnished apart- 
ments with rental rates and other information is available for review 
in the Housing Information Office, Clark 400,1203 S. Fourth Street. 

Generally, November 1 to March 1, and June 1 to October 1 are 
considered the most desirable times to visit the campus to arrange for 
apartment accommodations for the first and second semesters, re- 
spectively. 

GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSING 

The University of Illinois maintains housing for single graduate 
students on campus. Each study room is furnished and connects with 
a complete bath shared with the residents of one or two other rooms. 
Single and double rooms are available. Cooking is not allowed in 
student rooms, but a contract for food service in nearby dining rooms 
can be arranged. Residence halls have lounge facilities, laundry 
rooms, vending machines, and a computer lab. 

Students must be admitted before they can sign a housing contract. 
Priority in assignment is determined by the date that the completed 
contract is received. Students should make housing arrangements 
well before the term begins. For information, write to the Residence 
Hall Contracts Office, 200 Clark Hall, 1203 South Fourth Street, 
Champaign, IL 61820. 

Married students and students with families can choose from one- 
bedroom or two-bedroom (furnished or unfurnished) apartments. All 
units include a stove and a refrigerator. Convenient laundry facilities 
are available. For information, write to the Family Housing Office, 
1841 Orchard Place, Urbana, IL 61801. 

The Housing Information Office also maintains a current listing of 
privately owned apartments and rooms available in the community. 
Students seeking private housing are urged to visit the campus as 
early as possible, because all arrangements for this type of accommo- 
dation should be made in person. Anyone unfamiliar with standard 
leasing practices should ask a housing consultant for assistance. The 
Housing Information Office is located at Clark 400, 1203 South Fourth 
Street, Champaign, IL; (217) 333-1420. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Univer- 
sity residence halls are committed to a policy of nondiscrimination 
with respect to race, color, national origin, ancestry, religion, sex, 
marital status, sexual orientation, age, handicap, unfavorable dis- 
charge from the military, or status as a disabled veteran or veteran of 
the Vietnam era. 

UNIVERSITY POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION IN HOUSING 

In the rental of housing that is University-owned or University- 
certified, or of uncertified housing (apartments, uninspected rooming 
houses, etc.) that is listed with the Housing Information Office, the 
University of Illinois policy on nondiscrimination shall be followed. 
The University makes every effort to ensure that accepted listings 
include only those owners or managers who comply fully with its 
nondiscriminatory housing policy. 

If anyone has any reason to believe that an owner or manager of 
certified housing or any other listed housing has illegally discrimi- 
nated against an individual, this information should be communi- 
cated directly to the Housing Discrimination Committee in care of 400 
Clark Hall, 1203 South Fourth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



10 



Undergraduate Admission 



REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES 



Since the information in this two-year catalog is subject to change, 
prospective applicants should contact the Office of Admissions and 
Records at the address on the inside back cover for admission require- 
ments and applications for a specific term. A complete listing of fields 
of study and their admission requirements is given in the booklet 
Undergraduate Admissions Information, included with the application 
materials. Illinois high school students may obtain these materials 
from their high school counselors; others should write or call the 
Admissions Office for these materials. 

Admission counselors are available on campus in the Admissions 
and Records Building, 901 West Illinois Street, Urbana, on weekdays, 
excluding campus holidays, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Appointments 
are recommended and can be made by calling (217) 333-0302. The 
Campus Visitors Center offers campus tours and informational ses- 
sions for prospective students and their families. (See Campus Visi- 
tors Center.) The Satellite Office, located at 200 South Wacker Drive in 
Chicago, also has counselors available for consultation. Appoint- 
ments can be made by calling (312) 575-7810. 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

An undergraduate applicant to the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign may choose a field of interest from more than 150 pro- 
grams of study. These programs are referred to throughout this 
catalog as majors, options, or curricula and are explained in detail in 
the individual college sections found elsewhere in this catalog. 

In addition to the specific degree programs offered by all colleges, 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers preprofessional educa- 
tion for the fields of advertising, dentistry, journalism, law, medical 
dietetics, medical laboratory sciences, medical record administration, 
medicine, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and 
veterinary medicine. 

UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT CONSIDERATIONS 

The number of admissions to each undergraduate college and curricu- 
lum is carefully monitored to ensure that no more students are 
enrolled than the faculty and facilities can support. Each prospective 
student applies for admission to one of the eight undergraduate 
colleges or the Institute of Aviation, and to only one curriculum within 
that college or institute. 

Because admission is highly competitive, each applicant's initial 
choice of college and curriculum is important and should be carefully 
considered in consultation with counselors and parents. Due to the 
great interest in admission to all programs, there usually is not an 
opportunity for a student to ask for reconsideration of admission for 
an alternate program after an initial admission decision has been 
made. 

A prospective student undecided about a major field of study in a 
particular college may wish to consider applying for admission to one 
of the curricula not requiring students to declare degree program 
majors until the end of the sophomore year. These are the unassigned 
curriculum in the College of Commerce and Business Administration, 
the general education curriculum in the College of Education, and the 
general curriculum in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

A beginning freshman is required to remain in the college and the 
prescribed freshman program to which he or she has been admitted 
for at least two semesters of full-time study. 

A transfer student is obligated to remain in the college and the 
curriculum to which he or she has been admitted for at least the first 
semester of enrollment. A student on campus who wishes to transfer 
to another college must meet the accepting college's admission re- 
quirements and compete for any available space. Due to enrollment 
controls, transfer to some programs is very competitive. For example, 
the Colleges of Commerce and Business Administration, Engineering, 
and Education will consider only transfer students with 60 hours of 
prerequisite course work. 



ADMISSION OR RETURN DENIED BECAUSE OF 
MISCONDUCT 

The University reserves the right either to deny admission or return to 
any person because of previous misconduct that may substantially 
affect the interest of the University, or to admit or permit the return of 
such a person on an appropriate disciplinary status. A decision will 
not be made until the case has been heard by the appropriate disciplin- 
ary committee. This applies to persons not now enrolled in the 
University who might apply for admission or wish to return. A 
favorable action of the appropriate disciplinary committee does not 
abrogate the right of any dean or director to deny admission or return 
on the basis of scholarship. 

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION CATEGORIES 

Applicants for undergraduate admission comprise the several catego- 
ries that are defined in this section. A prospective applicant may then 
refer to the general requirements for admission and to the succeeding 
section most appropriate for his or her situation. 

Beginning Freshman. A beginning freshman applicant is either one 
who applies for admission while attending high school, regardless of 
the amount of college credit earned, or one who has graduated from 
high school but completed fewer than 12 semester hours or 18 quarter 
hours of transferable college classroom credit by the desired term of 
entry. 

Transfer Applicant. A transfer applicant is one who (1) has completed 
a minimum of 12 semester or 18 quarter hours of transferable college 
classroom credit by the desired term of entry, and (2) does not meet the 
definition of a beginning freshman or a returning student. 

Returning Student. A returning student is one who has previously 
registered on the campus as an undergraduate degree candidate and 
has not earned a degree. 

Second Bachelor's Degree Applicant. A second bachelor's degree 
applicant is one who has earned a bachelor's degree and wishes to 
continue study for another bachelor's degree. 

Nondegree Applicant. A nondegree applicant is one who wishes to 
take courses for credit, but does not intend to earn a degree from the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is committed to 
maintaining a safe environment for all members of the University 
community. As part of this commitment, the University requires 
applicants who are under current indictment or who have been 
convicted of a crime (other than a routine traffic offense or in a juvenile 
proceeding) to disclose this information as a mandatory step in the 
application process. A previous conviction or current indictment does 
not automatically bar admission to the University, but does require 
review. Complete information about the process is provided in the 
undergraduate application for admission. 

The following general University policies are applicable to all 
undergraduate applicants at both the beginning freshman and trans- 
fer student levels. 

To be eligible for consideration for admission, an applicant must 
meet certain requirements in terms of age, high school graduation, 
high school credits, college preparatory subject requirements, and 
competence in English. 

Age. An applicant must be at least fifteen years of age by the time of 
desired enrollment. 

High School Graduation. An applicant must be a graduate of a 
regionally accredited high school, a school in Illinois recognized by 
the state superintendent of education, or a school elsewhere with a 
rating equivalent to full recognition; graduates of other secondary 
schools and nongraduates of secondary schools may be admitted 
under the provisions for use of the General Educational Development 
Test. 

General Educational Development Test (GED). The achievement of 
satisfactory scores on the General Educational Development Test is 
acceptable in lieu of graduation from an accredited high school. This 
test alone will not fulfill all of the college preparatory subject require- 
ments. 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 



A standard score of 40 on each of the five tests and an average 
standard score of 45 on all five tests are the minimum scores needed 
to provide the following high school credit: 9 semesters of English and 
8 semesters of social studies. To be eligible to take these tests, appli- 
cants must be at least eighteen years of age or have been out of school 
for at least one year. 

If to be used in lieu of high school graduation, General Educational 
Development Test scores should be sent by the testing center directly 
to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

High School Credits. Applicants for admission to all curricula must 
present a total of at least 15 units of acceptable college preparatory 
schoolwork. Credit earned prior to grade nine is acceptable if the 
transcript of credit, certified by the senior high school, shows the 
credit as high school credit from grade eight. A unit course of study in 
the secondary school is a course covering an academic year and 
including not less than the equivalent of 120 sixty-minute hours of 
classroom work. Two hours of work requiring little or no preparation 
outside the class are considered as the equivalent to one hour of 
prepared classroom work. 

The subject pattern requirements are waived for transfer appli- 
cants. 

A student who lacks a required high school subject may satisfy the 
requirement at either a community college or elsewhere prior to 
enrollment at the University. This information must be communi- 
cated on the application for admission. One semester in college is the 
equivalent of two semesters of high school course work. 

Under extenuating circumstances, a specific subject requirement 
may be waived for otherwise well-qualified applicants. An applicant 
seeking a waiver of the subject pattern requirement should use the 
Personal Statement section of the application to state the rationale for 
requesting such action. 

Preparatory Subject Requirements in Units (Years) of Course work 



SUBJECT YEARS OF 

COURSE WORK 

English 4 

Mathematics 3 or 3.5 



Social Studies 2 

Laboratory Science 2 
One foreign language 2 



EXPLANATORY NOTES 



3.5 units of mathematics including 
trigonometry are required in the 
following curricula: 
Agricultural, Consumer and 
Environmental Sciences: Agricultural 
engineering sciences 
Commerce and Business 
Administration: all curricula 
Engineering: all curricula 
Fine and Applied Arts: Architectural 
studies 

Liberal Arts and Sciences: specialized 
curricula in biochemistry, chemical 
engineering, chemistry, geology, and 
physics 



Fine and Applied Arts curricula, except 
architectural studies, allow the 
substitution of two units of any 
combination of art, music, or foreign 
language. 



DESCRIPTION OF ACCEPTABLE HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

English: Studies in language, composition, and literature requiring 
practice in expository writing in all such work. Course work should 
emphasize reading, writing, speaking, and listening. 

Foreign Language: Two years of any one foreign language (or comple- 
tion of second level) fulfills the requirement. 

Laboratory Science: Laboratory courses in biology, chemistry, or phys- 
ics are preferred. Laboratory courses in astronomy and geology are 
also acceptable. General science is not acceptable. 

Mathematics: Algebra, geometry, advanced algebra, trigonometry. 
Applied business mathematics, pre-algebra, and computer courses 
are not acceptable. Algebra completed in grade eight will count as one 
year of high school algebra. 



Flexible academic 


2 


units 




Total academic 


15 or 15.5 


units 





Social Studies: History and government. Additional acceptable social 
studies include anthropology, economics, geography, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, and sociology. 

Flexible Courses: Two courses from any of the above five subject 
categories. Approved art, music, or vocational education courses may 
be counted in the flexible academic units category. 

GUIDELINES FOR ACCEPTING COLLEGE CREDITS EARNED BY 
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

1 . A college course taken by a high school student at a high school or 
college and applied toward the UIUC high school subject pattern 
requirement (see above) will not be awarded credit at UIUC. 

2. A college course taken by a high school student with a high school 
student population will not be awarded credit at UIUC (see item 4 below 
for possible course credit options). 

3. A transferable college course taken by a high school student with 
a college student population and not applied toward the UIUC high 
school subject pattern requirement may be awarded credit at UIUC 
and the grade may be included in the transfer grade point average. 

4. College credit can be awarded to high school students by earning 
an acceptable score on: (1) Advanced Placement (AP) Program exami- 
nations administered nationally each May; (2) the English or foreign 
language University placement examinations; or (3) UIUC Depart- 
mental Proficiency Examinations offered in all University courses 
normally open to freshmen and sophomores; many examinations are 
offered each semester as part of the new student activities. 

Competence in English. A minimum requirement for competence in 
English applies to all University students. Undergraduate applicants 
for admission may satisfy this minimum requirement by certifying 
that one of the following conditions has been fulfilled in a country 
where English is the primary language and in a school in which 
English is the primary language of instruction: 

— Graduation with credit for four units, or the equivalent, of English 
from a secondary school; 

— or successful completion of a minimum of two academic years of 
full-time study at the secondary school or collegiate level immediately 
prior to the proposed date of enrollment in the University. 

For an applicant who does not meet one of the above conditions, 
evidence can be provided by achieving a satisfactory score on a test of 
competence in English. The test(s) to be used and the minimum 
score(s) shall be subject to approval by the University Committee on 
Admissions with the advice of the University's Technical Committee 
on Testing. This requirement may be waived upon agreement by the 
director of the Office of Admissions and Records and the dean of the 
college concerned if evidence of competence in English presented by 
the applicant clearly justifies such action. 

ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

A few colleges and curricula have admission requirements in addition 
to the regular academic standards. Instructions on how to fulfill these 
additional requirements are forwarded to students soon after their 
applications are received. The following chart indicates the colleges 
and curricula with additional admission requirements. 

COLLEGES AND CURRICULA SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

AGRICULTURAL, 

CONSUMER AND 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

SCIENCES 

AVIATION 

COMMUNICATIONS 



EDUCATION 

FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 
Art 

Dance 

Graphic design 
Industrial design 
Music 
Photography 

Theatre 



Professional interest statement 
Professional interest statement 
Additional background information 
(transfer students) 
Additional background information 
(transfer students) 

Professional interest statement, slides of 

artwork, and/or writing sample 

Qualifying audition 

Portfolio review (transfer students) 

Portfolio review (transfer students) 

Qualifying audition 

Portfolio review (transfer 

students) 

Qualifying audition or 

interview 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



12 



HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 



PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH 

New students may be required to present evidence of satisfactory 
physical and mental health to the director of health services. Each 
admitted applicant will receive a Student Health Information form, 
which he or she must use to report proof of immunity to certain 
vaccine-preventable diseases as defined by state law and required by 
University regulations, as well as any other pertinent medical data, to 
the director of the McKinley Health Center at Urbana-Champaign. A 
minor (someone under eighteen years of age at the time of registra- 
tion) must submit the Student Health Information form with a parent's 
or guardian's written authorization for the student to receive treat- 
ment at the McKinley Health Center. A student who fails to return the 
completed Student Health Information form by the date shown on the 
form and who fails to comply by the end of the first term of enrollment 
is prohibited by state law from subsequent enrollment in the Univer- 
sity. Upon the advice of a McKinley Health Center physician, admis- 
sion or readmission of a student may be denied until the student is 
cleared by the McKinley Health Center. 

Students transferring from the University of Illinois at Chicago or 
Springfield should request that their Student Health Information 
forms be transferred by the health center on that campus to the 
McKinley Health Center. 

Military personnel may have their Student Health Information 
forms completed by a military physician. 

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL 

New and readmitted students are encouraged to present evidence of 
freedom from tuberculosis at the McKinley Health Center. All new 
international students are required to complete a tuberculosis screening at the 
McKinley Health Center before completing registration. 

Final evidence of freedom from tuberculosis is established by 
either a negative tuberculin skin test performed within the last twelve 
months by a health care provider in the United States, or a negative 
tuberculin skin test performed at the McKinley Health Center at 
Urbana-Champaign prior to registration. 

A person who has a positive skin test is required to have a chest X- 
ray. A person with a known history of positive reaction to the tuber- 
culosis skin test will not be retested, but will require a chest X-ray to 
show evidence of freedom from active tuberculosis. An individual 
who has had a chest X-ray performed within the previous twelve 
months will not require an additional chest X-ray if the previous chest 
X-ray is obtainable and meets the University's chest X-ray standards. 
A student with a positive skin test must schedule an appointment in 
Preventive Medicine at McKinley Health Center to review his or her 
health history. 

ADMISSION OF BEGINNING FRESHMEN 

Dates for filing complete applications for admission are given in the 
following and other application calendars. Any applicant claiming 
exceptional circumstances that justify special consideration should 
appeal in writing to the director of Admissions and Records for an 
extension of filing deadline dates. Only rarely, however, are spaces 
available by these late dates, and applicants are encouraged to apply 
during the periods indicated in the application calendars. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Admission decisions take into account the following objective criteria: 
(a) the courses taken in high school and (b) a combination of high 
school rank in class and admission test score; as well as the subjective 
information submitted on the student's Personal Statement. 

All applicants complete the Personal Statement on the application 
form, including information such as: 

— interest/experience in the intended major; 

— Advanced Placement or honors-level classes in high school; 

— state or national recognition for talent, creative ability, leadership, 
or academic achievement; 

— an ethnic or cultural background or an age group that will add 
diversity to this campus; 

— extenuating circumstances that significantly affected an otherwise 
exceptionally good academic record; or 

— any other information the student feels would complete the appli- 
cation profile. 



A student who attends a highly selective high school for which a 
profile may not be on file with the Office of Admissions and Records 
is urged to have a counselor attach the school profile to the student's 
transcript and to request a review through the Personal Statement. 

ADMISSION TEST INFORMATION 

Each beginning freshman applicant, regardless of rank in class or 
length of time out of school, is required to submit an admission test 
score from either the American College Testing (ACT) program or the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. An applicant will not complete the admission requirements 
until the test score is received by the Office of Admissions and Records 
in the form of an official score report sent directly from the testing 
agency concerned. Complete information concerning the test, the 
dates of test administration, and the location of testing centers may be 
obtained from high school counselors or by writing to the appropriate 
testing agency: American College Testing, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 
52240, or College Board, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, New York 
10023-6917. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

An applicant for admission as a freshman must submit the following 
(all credentials presented for admission become the permanent prop- 
erty of the University, are not subsequently released to the student or 
to another individual or institution, and are not held for reconsidera- 
tion of admission to subsequent terms): 

— A completed admission application form. Admission application 
forms are available from high school counselors and from the Office 
of Admissions and Records at the address on the inside back cover. 
High school students should submit applications through their high 
schools. 

— A $40 ($50 for international students) check or money order 
(amount subject to change), payable to the University of Illinois, in 
payment of the nonrefundable application processing fee. The Uni- 
versity is not responsible for cash sent through the mail. 

— An official high school transcript sent directly to the Office of 
Admissions and Records from the high school showing course work 
completed by the applicant, the date of graduation, and the size of the 
graduating class and the applicant's numerical rank. 

— An official admission test score report (ACT or SAT) sent directly 
to the Office of Admissions and Records from the testing agency. 

— A transcript of any college-level course work completed by the 
freshman applicant sent directly from the collegiate institution at- 
tended. 

Application Calendar: Freshman Applicants 



FILING PERIOD 

Spring Freshman Applicants: 
September 25- Contact the Office of 
November 1 Admissions and Records 
for openings. 



November 1- 
January 1 



Applications taken on a 
space-available basis. 



NOTIFICATION TIME 



December 



Approximately four 
weeks after filing 



Fall Freshman Applicants: 

October 1- Applications for all December-February 

January 1 colleges will be considered 

during this period if all 

required credentials have 

been received. 



December-February 



November 15 Priority Filing Date — 
Applications completed 
by this date may have the 
advantage when space is 
limited and applicants with 
equal qualifications are 
being reviewed. 



January-July Contact the Office of Admissions and Records to 

determine whether the desired academic program is 
accepting applications. 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 



13 



ADMISSION OF TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

To assist prospective applicants in assessing their opportunities for 
admission, transfer grade point average guidelines are published in 
the Undergraduate Admissions Information booklet available with appli- 
cation materials each September from the Office of Admissions and 
Records. These are guidelines only, and the final standards will 
depend on the number and qualifications of applicants to each pro- 
gram. 

Admission of a transfer applicant is based on a combination of the 
hours and content of transferable credit and the transfer grade point 
average as well as the information provided on the Personal State- 
ment. The minimum transfer grade point average is 2.25 (A= 4.0); most 
curricula require a higher grade point average. 

If the number of qualified applicants to a college or curriculum 
exceeds the admission quota, those best qualified will be admitted, 
and preference may be given to residents of Illinois. Lower-division 
transfer applicants are restricted due to limited space. 

Additional criteria may be considered in determining the admis- 
sion of those applicants near the borderline of the competitive appli- 
cant pool; these additional factors are described in the Personal 
Statement section. Also, an applicant who has had a significant break 
in the pursuit of an education and can demonstrate an improved 
academic performance, or an applicant for whom relocation from the 
Urbana-Champaign community would present a major hardship, 
may wish to address such a factor in the Personal Statement section of 
the application for admission. 

Eligibility of a transfer applicant with fewer than 30 semester 
hours of graded transferable classroom credit is based on (1) high 
school percentile rank and ACT or SAT test score, and (2) grade point 
average and content of transferable courses attempted. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT 
CHICAGO OR THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT SPRINGFIELD 

All admission requirements are the same as those for transfer students 
from other institutions. However, an applicant to the Urbana- 
Champaign campus is encouraged to go to the Chicago or Springfield 
Office of Admissions and Records, where copies of official credentials 
will be enclosed with the application and where current enrollment 
can be verified to permit a waiver of the application fee. 

TRANSFER APPLICANTS PREVIOUSLY DROPPED OR PLACED ON 
PROBATION FOR DISCIPLINARY REASONS 

A petition for admission of a transfer student who either is on 
disciplinary probation or has been dropped from another collegiate 
institution for disciplinary reasons must be approved by the appropri- 
ate subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGES 

Grade point averages are calculated on the basis of all transferable 
courses attempted for which grades are assigned and for which grade- 
point values can be determined. When a course is repeated, the grade 
point average is computed using both grades and all hours for the 
course. Incomplete grades are accepted as defined by the initiating 
institution. Grades in other course work completed, such as technical 
courses similar in content and level to courses taught at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, may be used in the evaluation for 
admission upon request of the college to which a student seeks 
admission. 

Since the grade point average used to establish admission qualifi- 
cations is based on all transferable course work attempted, applicants 
from institutions that delete grades for course work failed and /or 
repeated may find their opportunities limited to special admission. If 
the applicants are admitted and subsequently register, transfer grade 
point averages may not be recorded on their University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign records since the grading policies of the transfer 
institutions and this campus are not comparable. 

ACCEPTANCE OF CREDIT FROM OTHER COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTIONS 

Credit may be accepted for advanced standing from another accred- 
ited university or college. Accepted credit will be based on evaluation 
of the primary transcript of record of each institution attended. 
Duplicate credit will be counted in the grade point average but 
excluded from hours earned. A student who has passed a course at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may not be given credit 
for the same course taken elsewhere. 



ILLINOIS COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 

As of the publication of this catalog, Illinois colleges and universities 
are continuing development of the Illinois Articulation Initiative 
(IAI), a statewide agreement that allows transfer between institutions 
of the completed IAI General Education Core Curriculum. This agree- 
ment began with freshmen entering Illinois higher education institu- 
tions in summer 1998 or after. Students who anticipate transferring to 
UIUC are strongly advised to contact their academic adviser and to 
consult the UIUC transfer handbook for additional specific degree 
requirements in the program of their choice. 

TRADITIONAL TRANSFER CREDIT 

Admission of transfer students to the University of Illinois is based 
only on the transfer course work that is similar in nature, content, and 
level to that offered by the University of Illinois. Other course work 
completed, such as technical courses similar in content and level to 
courses taught at the University, will be used in evaluation for 
admission only upon the request of the dean of the college to which the 
student seeks admission. 

Transfer credit, as defined, will be accepted at full value for 
admission purposes on transfer to the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign if earned at: 

— Colleges and universities that offer degree programs comparable 
to programs offered by the University of Illinois and (1) are members 
of or hold Candidate for Accreditation status from the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Schools or another regional accrediting 
association, or (2) are accredited by another accrediting agency that is 
a member of the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation; or 

— Illinois public community colleges that are neither members of nor 
holders of Candidate for Accreditation status from the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Schools, but that are approved and 
recognized by the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) for a 
period of time not to exceed five years from the date on which the 
college registers its first class after achieving ICCB recognition. 

Certain colleges and universities do not meet the above specifica- 
tions but have been assigned a status by the University Committee on 
Admissions that permits credit to be accepted on a provisional basis 
for admission purposes on transfer to the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. Transfer credit, as defined, from such colleges 
and universities is accepted only on a deferred basis, to be validated 
by satisfactory completion of additional work in residence. Validation 
through satisfactory work in residence may be accomplished by 
earning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or another 
fully accredited 1 college or university, at least a 2.0 (A = 4.0) grade 
point average (higher if prescribed by the curriculum the student 
wishes to enter) in the first 12 to 30 semester (18 to 45 quarter) hours 
completed after transfer. 

Credit transferred from an approved 1 community or junior college 
is limited only by the provision that the student must earn at least 60 
semester or 90 quarter hours required for the degree at an approved 1 
four-year college or university after attaining junior standing. The 
student must meet the residence requirements that apply to all stu- 
dents for a degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
At least the last 30 semester or 45 quarter hours must be taken at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

In all cases, the precise amount of transfer credit that is applicable 
toward a particular degree will be determined by the University 
college and department concerned. 



1. Colleges and universities meeting one or more of the specifications as defined. 
NONTRADITIONAL TRANSFER CREDIT 

Acceptance of credit awarded on bases other than collegiate class- 
room experiences will be considered for transfer admission purposes 
as follows: 

Test credit for admission as transfer credit. Students presenting test 
credit awarded elsewhere, or test scores for admission will have that 
credit evaluated against cutoff scores established for those examina- 
tions on the Urbana-Champaign campus. Official score reports should 
be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records along with the 
application for admission to the University. A student presenting test 
credit as transfer credit may be granted transfer credit if the student (1 ) 
is transferring at least 12 graded semester hours of acceptable college- 
level classroom course work from the institution or single campus in 
a multicampus institution that awarded the credit by examination; 
and (2) has successfully completed advanced classroom course work 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



at the institution awarding the test credit in a course that is acceptable 
under I ni\ ersity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign transfer credit 
policies imd that can be considered as a sequential continuation of the 
material covered in the test; or (3) presents raw scores for evaluation. 
After admission, students not awarded credit under this policy 
mav attempt departmental proficiency examinations to receive credit 
in those areas in which they claim competence. 

Credit for military training. The completion of six months or more of 
continuous active duty in the U.S. armed forces, including basic or 
recruit training, is accepted for four semester hours of basic military 
science credit. Confirmation of the military record (DD214) for either 
an honorable discharge from active military duty to civilian life or 
transfer to the reserve component is required for credit to be granted. 
Candidates for graduation who are still in active military service are 
entitled to the same credit. Military science credit may also be granted 
for training completed in the service that is comparable to Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) courses at the University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign. Such credit may be used for admission pur- 
poses up to a maximum of 16 semester hours. Credit duplicating 
ROTC credit will not be awarded. 

Credit for education in the armed forces. Official transcripts of 
military service school training may be submitted for comparison to 
UIUC courses for transfer credit. 

Credit earned in academic courses sponsored by noncollegiate 
organizations, such as business, industry, and labor, not recognized 
by the April 1977 Board of Trustees policy statement. Credit earned 
in such courses is not normally accepted. This work may be evaluated 
by the college for potential credit toward a specific degree program 
after admission and registration, subject to validation by proficiency 
examination or successful completion of advanced course work. 
Credit hours may be reduced from that shown by the originating 
agency. 

All criteria are subject to the recommendations of the college of 
enrollment and the department that offers similar courses. 

Credit for experiential learning. Experiential learning credit is not 
accepted for transfer admission purposes. A student who believes 
himself or herself to be knowledgeable in a specific course may be 
granted credit through established proficiency procedures by the 
college of enrollment and the department offering a similar course 
after admission and registration. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

An applicant for admission as a transfer student must submit the 
following (all credentials presented for admission become the perma- 
nent property of the University, are not subsequently released to the 
student or to another individual or institution, and are not held for 
reconsideration of admission to subsequent terms): 

— A completed admission application form. Admission application 
forms are available from the Office of Admissions and Records at the 
address on the inside back cover. 

— A $40 ($50 for international students) check or money order 
(amount subject to change), payable to the University of Illinois, in 
payment of the nonrefundable application processing fee. The Uni- 
versity is not responsible for cash sent through the mail. Direct 
transfer applicants from the University of Illinois at Chicago or 
Springfield are exempt from payment of this fee. 

— An official high school transcript received directly from the high 
school of graduation. 

— Official transcripts of all college work attempted received directly 
from the institution(s) attended. 

— ACT or SAT test score received directly from the testing company, 
and high school class rank received directly from the high school 
attended. These are required only if the transfer student has fewer 
than 30 semester hours of graded transferable classroom credit at the 
time of submission of the application. 



Application Calendar Transfer Applicants 



FILING PERIOD 
Spring Transfer Applicants: 
September 25- Contact the Office of 
November 1 Admissions and Records 


NOTIFICATION TIME 
December 


for openings. 




November 1- Applications taken on a 
January 1 space-available basis. 


Approximately 

four weeks after filing 


Fall Transfer Applicants: 
February 1- Applications for all 
March 15 colleges will be 

considered during this 

period. 


Mid-April 


March 15- Applications taken on a 
August 1 space-available basis. 


Admission decisions 
made monthly. 


Contact the Office of 
Admissions and Records 




for openings. 




RETURNING STUDENTS 





A student whose authorized enrollment period has not expired needs 
only to enroll for a term in order to return to the Urbana-Champaign 
campus. A returning student must provide an official transcript 
directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from each collegiate 
institution at which course work was attempted since last attendance 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Returning students are assigned 
an earliest registration time, after which the student may access the 
U of I Direct course enrollment system to select classes for a term. 
Earliest registration times begin shortly after the midpoint in the 
semester prior to the desired term of enrollment. 

A returning student has the same status as when the student left 
the campus and is authorized to return to the same college and 
curriculum in which the student was last enrolled. If a returning 
undergraduate wishes to change his or her college or curriculum, the 
student must contact the college of desired enrollment. 

An encumbered student may enroll for courses but cannot com- 
plete registration until the encumbrance is cleared by the office that 
placed the encumbrance. Notification of student status appears on the 
U of I Direct system. The U of I Direct system displays the earliest 
registration time and date when the authorized enrollment period 
expires. Returning students who have forgotten their network pass- 
word must contact the Office of Admissions and Records to obtain a 
new password. 

A former student returning after the authorized enrollment period 
has expired must contact the dean of the college in which the student 
was last enrolled. The dean of the student's college can extend the 
authorized enrollment period to allow the student additional time to 
complete a degree. Each college has its own rules governing the return 
of students whose authorized enrollment period has expired. 

Returning international students must contact the International 
Student Affairs Office before starting the reentry process. 

APPLICANTS FOR SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREES 

A second bachelor's degree applicant must meet the same require- 
ments for admission as a transfer applicant for the first degree. In 
addition, the applicant is required to submit a petition indicating the 
reasons for his or her choice of program and campus; this petition 
must be approved by the dean of the college concerned. When space 
in a college or curriculum is inadequate, priority will be given to 
applicants seeking their first degrees. 

APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION AS NONDEGREE 
STUDENTS 

Nondegree admission and enrollment are restricted to participants in 
special programs and to those with nondegree educational objectives 
that cannot be met at another institution. Permanent residents of the 
Champaign-Urbana area are given priority for nondegree admission. 
Nondegree applicants must choose one of two enrollment options: 

Academic Year. Fall and spring semesters, with summers optional. 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 



IS 



Summer Session Attendance Only. Enrollment not allowed for the 
fall or spring term; a separate application for admission is necessary 
to be considered for the academic year enrollment pattern. An appli- 
cant holding a bachelor's degree who desires to take any 300-level 
course for graduate credit or any 400-level course must apply for 
graduate nondegree status, regardless of the level of other courses in 
which the applicant desires to enroll. A graduate applicant should 
complete the Application for Admission to the Graduate College and 
Application for Graduate Appointment form. 

NONDEGREE STUDENT REGULATIONS 

— Nondegree undergraduate students are assessed tuition at the 
upper-division rate. 

— Enrollment is limited to part-time status (fewer than 12 credit 
hours of course work in any semester). 

— Course enrollment requires the approval of the department offer- 
ing the course and the college of enrollment at the beginning of each 
semester. 

— Nondegree students may not pre-register in classes for fall and 
spring semesters. 

— Registration for the fall or spring term is not permitted until the 
fourth day of classes. The late registration charge will be waived for 
undergraduate nondegree students registering during the fourth and 
fifth days of classes. 

— Registration after the fifth day of classes requires the written 
approval of the dean of the college of enrollment. 

— The college has the privilege of terminating a continuing nondegree 
student's enrollment before the student's registration for any term. 

— The same grading system is applicable to both degree and 
nondegree students. Credit earned on nondegree status will not be 
applicable to a degree except by subsequent admission to degree 
status. 

— To be considered for degree-status enrollment, nondegree-status 
students must reapply for admission. 

— Nondegree students admitted to a college/or summer to continue in 
the fall have the option of registering for summer and continuing in the 
fall, or registering initially for fall. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

An applicant for admission as a nondegree student must submit the 
following (all credentials presented for admission become the perma- 
nent property of the University, are not subsequently released to the 
student or to another individual or institution, and are not held for 
reconsideration of admission to subsequent terms): 

— A completed application form (prospective undergraduate 
nondegree applicants should specifically request the Undergraduate 
Nondegree Admission Application). 

— A $40 ($50 for international students) check or money order 
(amount subject to change), payable to the University of Illinois, in 
payment of the nonrefundable application processing fee. The Uni- 
versity is not responsible for cash sent through the mail. 

— A transcript showing the applicant's highest level of academic 
achievement, if the applicant for the academic year option has no prior 
credit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

— A transcript showing course work completed since last enrollment 
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, if the applicant has 
prior credit on this campus. 

ADMISSION TO CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence courses are open to any applicant who can meet 
University entrance requirements and who is in good standing at the 
last school attended, and to any person 15 years of age or older whose 
application is approved by the head of Guided Individual Study. 

An application from a student who has been dropped from the 
University of Illinois or any other collegiate institution will be consid- 
ered only upon the recommendation of the authorities of the campus 
or institution from which the student was dropped. 

For further information, write to Guided Individual Study, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Suite 1406, 302 East John 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 



ADMISSION TO CLASSES AS A VISITOR 



ENROLLMENT GUIDELINES 

Visitors are not permitted in laboratory, military, kinesiology (other 
than theory), or studio classes. 

A former student not currently registered must obtain the ap- 
proval of the dean of the college in which he or she was last registered. 
Former students are not permitted to attend classes as visitors while 
on dropped status. 

A student enrolled at the Urbana-Champaign campus who desires 
to attend a class as a visitor must obtain the written permission of the 
instructor of the class and the approval of the dean of his or her college. 

A person who has never been a registered student at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus must obtain the required approval from the dean 
of the college in which the course is offered. 

For additional information, contact the Office of Admissions and 
Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

CHARGES 

Persons not registered, or registered for less than a full program (fewer 
than 12 semester hours), are charged a $15 (amount subject to change) 
visitor's fee for each course attended. The fee is waived for persons 
sixty-five years of age or older. 

Persons registered for a full program (12 semester hours or more) 
may visit other courses without additional charges. Students holding 
scholarships, tuition waivers, or staff appointments generally may 
audit University courses without charge. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

The Office of Admissions and Records determines which students 
shall be classified as foreign (international) according to the following 
definition: A person who is a citizen or permanent resident alien of a 
country or political area other than the United States and has a 
residence outside the United States to which he or she expects to return 
and either is, or proposes to be, a temporary alien in the United States 
for educational purposes is classified as a foreign (international) 
student. For admission purposes, refugees, parolees, and conditional 
entrants are classified as foreign and shall meet all requirements for 
foreign students except for the certification of financial resources. 

International undergraduate applicants are urged to submit ad- 
mission applications and supporting documents approximately one 
year prior to the desired term of entry. Competition is extremely keen, 
and late applicants lower their chances for admission. Additional 
information and application materials are available from the Office of 
Admissions and Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission is competitive, and preference is given to those applicants 
determined to have the best potential for academic success at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The minimum require- 
ments for admission are: 

— Satisfaction of University minimum requirements in terms of age, 
high school graduation, high school courses, and health (see Admis- 
sion of Transfer Applicants section). 

— Satisfaction of any additional requirements for admission (see 
Admission of Transfer Applicants section). 

— Satisfaction of the University requirement of competence in En- 
glish (see next section). 

— Adequate financial resources (see Financial Verification Require- 
ment section). 

ENGLISH COMPETENCE REQUIREMENT 

Evidence of English proficiency is required of students who request 
consideration for admission. This evidence is provided by a satisfac- 
tory score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Undergraduate applicants are exempt from this test if they have 
fulfilled one of the following requirements in a country where English 
is the primary language and in a school in which English is the primary 
language of instruction: 

— Graduation with credit for 3 units, or the equivalent, of English; or 

— Successful completion of a minimum of two academic years of full- 
time study at the secondary school or collegiate level immediately 
prior to the proposed date of enrollment in the University. 



PROGRAMS Oh STUDY 



16 



1 he 1 OEFL test is used to evaluate evidence of English proficiency. 
It is administered under two testing programs. The computer-based 
TOEFL i> given at Sylvan Technology Centers worldwide and is 
available throughout the year by appointment only. The paper-based 
,in is still offered in some countries on 12 dates. A free informa- 
tion bulletin is available for each of the testing programs from the 
following sources: 

- TOEFL Web site at http://www.toefl.org (download or order 
onlirn 

— From the office serving the area (a list is on the Web site) 

— United States Information Service offices 

— Binational centers and private educational organizations, such as 
the Institute of International Education 

- TOEFL Services - Mail: P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, 
USA. Phone: 1-609-771-7100. E-mail: toefl@ets.org 

Applicants who have already taken the test should request that the 
TOEFL office send their scores to the Office of Admissions and 
Records. For admission purposes, TOEFL scores are valid for only two 
years prior to the proposed term of entry. If the TOEFL score is 
acceptable but indicates the need for further English study, a place- 
ment test will be required upon arrival at the University. On the basis 
of the placement test scores, students may be required to enroll in 
noncredit English courses and to take a reduced academic load. 

In cases in which TOEFL testing dates are not available prior to the 
desiied term of entry, the University will arrange for substitution of 
the Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) test 
given by the English Language Institute Testing and Certification 
Division of the University of Michigan. Complete instructions to 
arrange for the MELAB examination will be provided by the Office of 
Admissions and Records to each applicant for whom the test is 
required. Final admission status is determined after the test results 
have been received. 

The current minimum cutoff scores are 550 or 213 (computer- 
based) on the TOEFL and 83 on the MELAB. The English requirement 
for graduation is explained in the General Education Requirements 
section. 

FINANCIAL VERIFICATION REQUIREMENT 

In order to qualify for a Certificate of Visa Eligibility (Form 1-20 or IAP- 
66), a foreign (international) applicant must submit complete and 
accurate information regarding his or her source of financial support. 
This information is in compliance with regulations of the U.S. Immi- 
gration and Naturalization Service. Current information and certifica- 
tion are also required of foreign applicants transferring from institu- 
tions within the United States. Financial resources must be docu- 
mented for the entire length of time required to earn a degree. 
Expenses for the 1998-99 academic year were estimated at $22,572, 
excluding summer session tuition and fees. This figure is subject to 
increase without notice and is presented here for planning purposes. 
Current estimated expenses may be obtained by writing to the Office 
of Admissions and Records. 

Prospective students who cannot document the availability of 
sufficient resources will be denied admission. 

University financial aid funds are extremely limited and are avail- 
able only to participants in specific exchange programs. Individual 
requests for financial aid cannot be considered. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

An international applicant for admission must submit the following 
(all credentials presented for admission or readmission become the 
permanent property of the University and are not subsequently 
released to the student or to another individual or institution): 

- An Application for Undergraduate Admission for Applicants 
from Other Countries. 

- A $50 (U.S.) nonrefundable application processing fee (amount 
subject to change) in the form of a check or money order payable to the 
University of Illinois. The University is not responsible for cash sent 
through the mail. The check must indicate that the bank has an 

ffiliated bank in the United States. 

- Official records for the last four years of secondary school study 
and/or any postsecondary or university-level work completed or 
attempted. 

All records must list subjects taken, grades earned, or examination 
results (including those passed or failed in each subject); and all 
diplomas and certificates awarded. Official translations must accom- 



pany these records if they are in a language other than English. All 
credentials must be certified by an officer of the educational institu- 
tion attended or by the U.S. embassy or consulate. An applicant 
attending a U.S. or Canadian school should have credentials submit- 
ted directly by the school. Notarized copies of credentials do not fulfill 
official document requirements. 

A list of all courses in progress, including recently completed 
course work that is not listed on the transcript, must also be included 
on the application. When possible, an applicant must have a school 
official provide a statement of the applicant's rank in class. This 
statement should indicate the applicant's performance relative to the 
performance of other members of the secondary or postsecondary 
school class. Applicants to some fields may be required to submit 
additional materials, such as background information and aptitude 
test results, or to participate in auditions. These items will be re- 
quested by the Office of Admissions and Records when needed and 
will be required only for applicants satisfying all other admission 
criteria. 

— The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 
or the Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) test, 
if required, as indicated above. 

— Declaration and certification of finances as required of all interna- 
tional applicants. 

Application Calendar: International Applicants 



FILING PERIOD 

Spring Applicants: 
Mid-September- 
November 1 



Contact the 
International 
Admissions Office 
for openings. 



Summer and Fall Applicants: 
Mid-September- For freshmen. 

November 15 



January-March 1 



For transfers. 



NOTIFICATION TIME 

Decisions made 
and announced in 
order received. 



Decisions made and 
announced in order 
received. 

Decisions made and 
announced in order 
received. 



ADMISSION TO SUMMER SESSION 



ADMISSION PROCEDURES FOR DEGREE-SEEKING STUDENTS 

The procedure for admission of an undergraduate student to the 
summer session varies according to the previous status of the student. 
Students who have been approved for admission in the fall semes- 
ter will be authorized to begin in the preceding summer session if they 
notify the Office of Admissions and Records of their intent to enroll in 
the summer session. 



PREVIOUS STATUS 

Previously enrolled and not 
dropped for academic reasons. 



Dropped for academic reasons at 
end of spring semester; desire 
nondegree summer session only. 



Dropped for academic reasons at 
end of spring semester; seek 
reinstatement to same or different 
college for summer. 



ACTION REQUIRED 

Application not required; 
register for courses using 
U of I Direct system. 

Do not apply for admission; 
seek release by former 
college to dean of summer 
session for approval. 

Do not apply for admission; 
petition dean of desired 
college for reinstatement. 



ADMISSION OF SUMMER SESSION NONDEGREE STUDENTS 

Approval of admission or return as a nondegree student to the 
summer session only does not allow enrollment in the fall or spring. 
A student who was admitted to the summer session only as a nondegree 
student and who later wishes to enter one of the colleges of the 
University as a degree or nondegree student must apply for admission 
in the usual manner and satisfy requirements in effect at the time of 
application. A person admitted as a nondegree undergraduate stu- 
dent to the summer session only is not assigned to any college or 
curriculum. 



STUDENT COSTS 



17 



Undergraduate nondegree applications for admission to the sum- 
mer session only may be approved by the director of the Office of 
Admissions and Records under the following conditions: 

— Former University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students who 
have not graduated from the University may be admitted as nondegree 
candidates if approved by the director of the Office of Admissions and 
Records through release from their former colleges. Students on drop 
or probationary status must petition the Summer Session Office for 
admission as nondegree candidates. If approved, they will be admit- 
ted on probation for that single summer session only. 

— An undergraduate student enrolled in another institution may 
enroll in the summer session as a nondegree candidate if the student 
is eligible to return to the collegiate institution last attended. 

— Any person 15 years of age or older who has never attended a 
collegiate institution, but who gives evidence that he or she possesses 
the requisite background and ability to pursue profitably courses for 
which he or she is qualified, may enroll in the summer session as a 
nondegree candidate. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

An applicant for admission to summer session as a nondegree student 
must submit the following (all credentials presented for admission 
become the permanent property of the University, are not subse- 
quently released to the student or to another individual or institution, 
and are not held for reconsideration of admission to subsequent 
terms): 

— A completed admission application form. This form is available 

from the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on the inside 

back cover. 

— A $40 ($50 for international students) check or money order (amount 

subject to change) payable to the University of Illinois, in payment of 

the nonrefundable application processing fee. The University is not 

responsible for cash sent through the mail. 

— A list of the specific course work desired. 

— Additional documents required of certain applicants, as follows: 

A high school graduate (see first category under Admission of 
Summer Session Nondegree Students, above) may be required to 
submit (1) an official high school transcript received from the high 
school showing rank in graduating class, and (2) an official report of 
the admission test score (ACT or SAT) sent directly to the Office of 
Admissions and Records from the testing agency concerned. 

A teacher may be requested to submit a statement verifying his or 
her employment. 

A student enrolled at another collegiate institution may be re- 
quested to submit a statement of eligibility to return to the institution 
attended. 

Student Costs 



STUDENT EXPENSES 

Tuition, fees, and housing charges for the 1999-00 and 2000-01 aca- 
demic years were not available when this catalog was published. An 
undergraduate student budget for the 1 998-99 academic year is shown 
in the table below. Although student expenses are expected to in- 
crease, this budget can be used for planning purposes. 

Information about tuition and fee charges for a current academic 
term, including charges for flight instruction and special programs, 
waivers and exemptions, and refunds, is available from the Records 
Services Center, 901 West Illinois Street, (217) 333-0210. Tuition and 
fee information is also available on the World Wide Web at http:// 
www.oar.uiuc.edu/records/index.html#registration. 



Estimated Undergraduate Student Expenses for the 1 998-99 
Academic Year 

(Average expenses for single, undergraduate students are shown below. This 
budget covers a full program of study for two semesters exclusive of such 
items as recreation and major articles of clothing.*) 



ILLINOIS RESIDENTS 


NONRESIDENTS 


$3,408 


$10,224 


Tuition (freshmen and 
sophomores)* 


1,178 


1,178 


Fees 


670 


670 


Textbooks and other school 
supplies 


5,346 


5,346 


Meals and housing (includes 
double room and board 
[20 meals per week] and $16 
Residence Hall Association 
dues) 


426 


426 


Travel allowance to and from 
home** 


1,798 


1,798 


Personal expenses (includes 
nonprovided meals and 
miscellaneous expenses at a 
moderate level) 


$12,826 


$19,642 


Total: Two semesters 



* Tuition is assessed on the basis of college and, in some cases, curriculum of 

enrollment, residency classification, and credit range for which the student is registered. 

Students enrolled in specific curricula in various colleges are assessed a tuition 

differential. 

** An additional $330 travel allowance must be provided for students from states not 

adjacent to Illinois. 

REGISTRATION AGREEMENT 

U of I Direct is the system that allows students to register for courses 
by computer. Students who register for courses agree to pay tuition 
and fees to the University according to the payment policies and 
schedules adopted by the Board of Trustees. If a student wishes to 
cancel registration, and thus avoid payment of tuition and fee charges, 
the student must do so by 5:00 p.m. of the first day of instruction. 

Unauthorized use of University of Illinois computerized systems, 
data, or resources; unauthorized use of another individual's identifi- 
cation, account, or password; or an attempt to gain unauthorized 
access is prohibited by University policy and may constitute a viola- 
tion of Illinois state law. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Tuition and fees for undergraduate students who were enrolled on 
campus in fall 1998 are shown in the 1998-99 Semester Tuition and Fee 
Schedule. Charges are assessed on the basis of the student's college 
(undergraduate, graduate, or professional) and in some cases, cur- 
riculum of enrollment; classification as resident or nonresident of 
Illinois; and credit range as determined by the total number of semes- 
ter hours or graduate units for which the student is registered. 

Undergraduate credit is counted in semester hours. Credit for 
graduate work is counted in units. For fee assessment purposes, 1 unit 
equals 4 semester hours. A full-time student is one who is registered 
for 12 or more semester hours of credit, or 3 or more units. 

The Service Fee supports operation of certain campus facilities 
such as the Illini Union, Turner Student Services Building, Assembly 
Hall, and the Intramural Physical Education Building. The Health 
Insurance Fee covers the cost of the University Student Health Insur- 
ance Program that provides worldwide hospital, medical, and surgi- 
cal insurance coverage. The Health Service Fee provides health care 
and limited prescription service at the campus McKinley Health 
Center and helps support the Counseling Center. The General Fee 
supports certain fixed costs of campus fee-supported buildings such 
as the Assembly Hall and the Illini Union. The Transportation Fee 
finances a campus and community transportation plan for students. 

Students are also assessed: 

— $4 each semester for SEAL (Students for Equal Access to Learning) 
to supplement existing financial aid for needy students. A refund is 
available upon request during the seventh week of instruction in a 
semester for students not desiring to participate. 

— $7 each semester and summer session for SORF (Student Organi- 
zation Resource Fee) to help support the Student Legal Service and the 
programs and services of registered student organizations. Refunds 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



18 



are available upon request during the sixth week of instruction in a 
semester and summer session. 

— S5 each semester and S3 for summer term 2 to support productions 
at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (KCPA). Refunds are 
available upon request during the fifth week of instruction for fall and 
spring. No refunds are available during the summer session. 

Students enrolling at less than one-half time (less than 6 hours or 
1 Viunits) are not assessed the service fee; the McKinley Health Center 
fee; the transportation fee; the KCPA fee; or the SEAL or SORF fee and 
are not eligible to use the services supported by these fees. Such 
students may elect to purchase one or more of the services directly 
from the provider. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Students who register after the first day of instruction in any semester, 
including University staff and persons who submitted admission 
applications too late to be processed before the first day of instruction, 
must pay a Late Registration Fine of $15 (amount subject to change). 
(This fine is not covered by scholarships or tuition waivers. It may be 
waived under exceptional circumstances upon petition to the director 
of the Office of Admissions and Records. The petition form is available 
from the Records Services Center, 901 West Illinois Street.) 

FLIGHT TRAINING COURSES 

In addition to the regular tuition and fees, students taking flight 
training pay: 

$2,528 AVI 101— Private Pilot, I 

2,194 AVI 102— Orientation Refresher 

3,236 AVI 120— Private Pilot, II 

1,704 AVI 121— Private Pilot, IIA 

2,923 AVI 130— Commercial-Instrument, I 

3,093 AVI 140— Commercial-Instrument, II 

1,732 AVI 200 — Commercial-Instrument, HI 

3,175 AVI 210— Commercial-Instrument, IV 

5,266 AVI 211 — Commercial-Instrument, V 

2,632 AVI 220— Flight Instructor 

1,587 AVI 222— Instrument Flight Instructor 

2,248 AVI 224— All Altitude Orientation 

2,901 AVI 280— Special Rating (Multiengine Land) 

1,298 AVI 281— Cockpit Resource Management 

2,961 AVI 291— Special Ratings and/or Specialized Flight 

1,128 AVI 292 — Professional Multiengine Indoctrination 

811 AVI 293— Corporate-Jet Pilot Orientation 

(These fees for 1998-99 are subject to change and are not covered by 
scholarships or tuition and fee waivers.) 

RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR ADMISSION AND 
TUITION ASSESSMENT 

The residence classification of applicants for admission is determined 
on the basis of the information given on their applications and other 
credentials. Eligibility for admission to the University is determined 
and tuition is assessed in accordance with this decision. 

Persons who take exception to the residence status assigned to 
them should refer to Appendix B. 

PAYMENT REQUIREMENT 

Tuition and fees assessed for any semester, term, or summer session 
are due and payable in full by the deadline indicated on the Registra- 
tion Statement of Charges and Aid. The privilege of paying these 
charges by installment may be granted by the Office of Student 
Accounts and Cashiers (see next section). Students who do not make 
full or first installment payment by the scheduled due date shown on 
the statement will be assessed a $25 (amount subject to change) charge 
for late registration payment, which will be billed to their student 
accounts. 

A delinquent service charge of 1.5 percent per month, or $2 per 
month, whichever is greater, is added to delinquent student accounts. 
The delinquent service charge is applied to all items charged to the 
student account and for which payment is delinquent. 



INSTALLMENT PLAN FOR PAYING TUITION, FEES, AND 
HOUSING CHARGES 

Students enrolled on campus may pay tuition and fees, single-student 
residence hall charges, and flight instruction fees on an installment 
plan. This plan is not available to students registered in extramural, 
correspondence, and four-week summer term courses, or to students 
for whom this privilege has been denied. 

Under the installment plan, semester charges are collected in three 
installments. The first is payable during the first ten days of instruc- 
tion, and the remaining ones are payable in each of the two following 
months. Approximately one-half of the summer term 2 charges must 
be paid during the first seven days of instruction with the remainder 
due during the following month. There is a finance charge of 1 percent 
of the total amount deferred, or $2, whichever is greater, when charges 
are paid in installments (amount subject to change). 

Students who pay their accounts on the installment plan and later 
withdraw from the University, or reduce their registration to a lower 
credit range after the established refund deadline date, are liable for 
the full amount of tuition and fees assessed. 

Installment payments are delinquent on the first day of the month 
after the date that payment is due. A delinquent service charge of 1.5 
percent per month, or $2 per month, whichever is greater, is added to 
delinquent accounts (amount subject to change). The delinquent 
service charge is applied to all items charged to the student account 
and for which payment is delinquent. 

Students who are in debt to the University at the end of any 
academic term may not be permitted to register in the University 
again. They are not entitled to receive diplomas or official statements 
or transcripts of credits until either the indebtedness has been paid or 
suitable arrangements for payment have been made, unless either 
there is a pending bankruptcy petition of the student seeking a 
discharge of all such indebtedness or all such indebtedness has been 
discharged. 

REFUNDS 



CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 

Individuals who have placed courses on their record prior to the 
beginning of the term and later decide not to attend the University 
may cancel their registration by 5:00 p.m. of the first day of instruction 
for the term and avoid all tuition and fee charges. Individuals who are 
ineligible to continue in the University for actions initiated by the 
University based on academic, disciplinary, or medical reasons before 
5:00 p.m. on the first day of instruction for the term have their 
registrations become void and are not entitled to student privileges. 

If a written request to cancel registration is received in the Office 
of Admissions and Records by 5:00 p.m. on the first day of instruction, 
a student's registration agreement will be cancelled and tuition and 
fees will not be charged. 

Students may not cancel their registration once they have used fee- 
supported services. If they leave the University, they must officially 
withdraw from the University. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students who have been charged tuition and/or fees and later with- 
draw from the University prior to the completion of 60 percent of the 
term receive a refund on a pro rata basis. Assessed tuition, the service 
fee, the general fee, and the transportation fee are refunded on a pro 
rata basis less 5 percent of the assessed amount or $100, whichever is 
less. The health insurance and health services fees are nonrefundable. 
Students continue to be covered by health insurance and are eligible 
to receive health services (if these fees were paid) until the first day of 
instruction for the following term. 

Before a refund is made to a student, the University must make a 
refund to appropriate financial aid programs providing assistance to 
the student. A student indebted to the University at the time of 
withdrawal will have the amount owed deducted from the amount of 
any refund available. 

Students permitted to pay tuition and fees on the installment plan, 
or who make no payment at all, and then withdraw from the Univer- 
sity, are liable for the full amount of tuition and fees originally 
assessed less applicable refunds. 

Special refund policies apply to those who withdraw to enter 
either active duty in the armed forces or other approved national 
defense service. 



STUDENT COSTS 



19 



In case of extenuating circumstances, such as medically docu- 
mented serious illness or injury, exception to these refund periods 
may be made by the director of the Office of Admissions and Records. 
The petition form to request a refund is available at the Records 
Service Center, 901 West Illinois Street. 

REDUCTION OF PROGRAM 

Students who paid tuition and/or fees and later reduce their registra- 
tion to a lower credit range receive full refund of the difference in 
tuition and fees specified for the ranges if the change is made during 
the periods listed below. Thereafter, no refund is allowed. 

— In a semester, twelve-week term, or eleven-week summer law 
program, full refund, except for the nonrefundable charge, during the 
first ten days of instruction; no refund thereafter; 

— In an eight-week summer term, full refund, except for the nonre- 
fundable charge, during the first seven days of instruction; no refund 
thereafter; and 

— For University terms of different lengths, refund periods are 
determined proportionately in accordance with the above principles. 

EXEMPTIONS AND WAIVERS OF TUITION AND FEES' 

Appearing below are the waivers and exemptions available to stu- 
dents and the conditions under which they are granted. 

Recipients of waivers have had the amount for the service actually 
assessed and then waived by University policy. Such recipients are 
therefore eligible to receive the benefits of the service provided by the 
charge. 

An exemption carries no original charge, so recipients are not 
eligible to receive the benefits of the services provided by the charge. 
Students exempt from any particular charge may make individual 
arrangements with the service provider; such arrangements are sub- 
ject to the policies of the individual provider. 

Unless otherwise exempted by Board of Trustees authorization, 
the payment of tuition and fees is required of academic employees of 
the University or allied agencies under appointment for less than 25 
percent of full-time service, and of staff employees under appoint- 
ment for less than 50 percent of full-time service. 

For tuition and fees assessment purposes, an appointment must be 
to an established position for a specific amount of time and a salary 
commensurate with the percentage of time required, and it must 
require service for not less than three-fourths of the academic term. 
Note: A term is defined as running from the first day of instruction 
through the last day of final examinations. Three-fourths of a term is 
defined as 91 calendar days in a semester and 41 calendar days during 
the eight-week summer term. Tuition and fees privileges do not apply 
to students employed on an hourly basis in either an academic or staff 
capacity, or to persons on leave without pay. 

University employees appointed to established civil service posi- 
tions whose rates of pay are determined by negotiation, prevailing 
rates, and union affiliation are not considered as paid on an hourly 
basis and are entitled to the same tuition and fees privileges accorded 
to other staff members under the regulations. 

A student who resigns an appointment, or whose appointment is 
cancelled before rendering service for at least three-fourths of the 
term, becomes subject to the full amount of the appropriate tuition and 
fees for that term unless the student withdraws from University 
classes at the same time or before the appointment becomes void, or 
the student has submitted a final thesis within one week after the 
resignation date. 

Students holding appointments — as academic employees, gradu- 
ate assistants, or fellows — to the close of the second semester, for 
whom tuition and/or the Service Fee have been provided by exemp- 
tion or waiver, are entitled to the same exemption of tuition and /or the 
Service Fee for the summer terms 1 and 2 immediately following, 
providing they hold no appointments during the summer. 

Tuition and fee waivers are not granted for the Executive M.B.A. 
Program or other self-supporting programs. 



1. For the purpose of this section, the four employment categories at this campus are 

defined as follows: 

Faculty: The faculty includes (1 ) those in the professorial ranks (i.e., professor, associate 

professor, assistant professor); (2) instructors and lecturers; and (3) teaching, research, 

and clinical associates. Various prefixes may be used in conjunction with these ranks, 

such as adjunct, clinical, visiting, or research. 

Academic Professional (Academic): Academic professionals are those employees whose 

positions have been designated by the president and the chancellor as meeting 



specialized administrative, professional, or technical needs. Academic professional 

employees receive an academic contract issued by the Board of Trustees for a term 

appointment. They are accorded the rights and privileges pertaining to other academic 

personnel except those that apply specifically to academic employees with faculty 

rank, such as eligibility for tenure. 

Graduate Student Assistant: Graduates student assistants include teaching, research, 

and clinical assistants. 

Staff: Staff employees are those members of the University work force subject to the 

rules of the State Universities Civil Service System. 

APPLICATION FEE 

Applicants for admission must submit a $40 ($50 for international 
applicants) application fee (amount subject to change) to help defray 
processing costs. The fee is nonrefundable to applicants approved for 
admission and to denied applicants who submit complete or partial 
applications prior to the date all admission spaces are filled in the 
college and curriculum of their choice. Application fees will be re- 
turned to persons applying for admission to curricula that were closed 
to further admission or to programs not being offered. 
Exempt from payment of the application fee are: 

— Faculty and academic professional employees. 

— University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

— Permanent staff employees of the Jniversity and other institutions 
and agencies under the University Civil Service System who have 
been assigned to established permanent and continuous staff posi- 
tions and who are employed for at least 50 percent of full time. 

— Employees of certain specifically identified related agencies who 
are authorized tuition and /or Service Fee waivers. 

— Students registered at the University of Illinois at Chicago or 
Springfield who wish to enroll at the Urbana-Champaign campus for 
the summer session only. 

— Persons eligible under the Illinois Veteran Grant Program. 

Waivers of the application fee are authorized for: 

— Applicants who, because of extreme financial hardship, cannot 
meet the cost of the fee. In general, evidence of extreme financial 
hardship is a family income at or below the low standard family 
budget of the Bureau of Labor Statistics or the receipt of a testing 
waiver from the American College Testing Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Applicants currently attending another 
collegiate institution may provide evidence of the financial package 
received at the institution. 

— Applicants under approved foreign exchange programs in which 
the University participates, such as the Latin American Scholarship 
Program of American Universities and the African Scholarship Pro- 
gram of American Universities, and foreign students participating in 
approved exchange programs in which the waiver of fees is reciprocal. 

— Intercampus transfers at the same level: undergraduate to under- 
graduate, or graduate to graduate. 

— Applicants requesting a change in admission consideration from 
one campus of the University of Illinois to another for the same level 
and term. This would include applicants denied admission on one 
campus as well as applicants wishing to cancel admission or admis- 
sion consideration on one campus for similar consideration on an- 
other campus. Students applying simultaneously to two campuses 
must pay the application fee at each campus. Undergraduate students 
applying for admission to a professional or graduate college on either 
of the two campuses must pay the application fee. 

— Students from other universities participating in the Committee 
on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) Program by taking courses at the 
University of Illinois. 

— Persons who are applying for CIC-supported fellowships to study 
at a CIC member institution. 

— Graduate and professional applicants whose entry is advanced or 
delayed by action of their major departments are not required to pay 
a second application fee. 

— University of Illinois students applying for work on a second 
campus as concurrent registrants, non-University of Illinois students 
applying as concurrent registrants from another institution with 
which the University has a reciprocal agreement, and students who 
have been concurrent enrollees the immediately preceding term and 
who plan to return to their primary campuses the following term. 

— Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive assignment 
of practice teachers, who receive assignment of students meeting the 
clinical experience requirement in teacher education, or who cooper- 
ate in research projects related to teacher education, cooperating 
librarians, school-nurse teachers, social welfare field supervisors, 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



20 

/ 998-99 SEMESTER TUITION AND FEE SCHEDULE, FULL-TIME STUDENTS REGISTERED ON CAMPUS 

(SUBJECT TO CHANGE)* 

To be considered full-time, a student must be registered for 1 2 or more semester hours or for 3 or more units. Freshmen non-resident students pay 
the higher of the two rates listed for non-resident undergraduate students. Lower-division students are those with 0-59.9 semester hours of credit. 
Upper-division students have 60 or more semester hours of credit or are enrolled as nondegree. 



TUITION 



UNDERGRADUATE 


RESIDENT 


NONRESIDENT 


Tuition (Base Rate) 


$1,704 


$4,642 


$5,112 


Engineering 


1,992 


4,930 


5,400 


Chem./Life Sciences 


1,954 


4,892 


5,362 


Art. Arch., Music (Lower) 


1,804 


4,742 


5,212 


Art, Arch., Music (Upper) 


1.904 


4,842 


5,312 


GRADUATE 


RESIDENT 


NONRESIDENT 


Tuition (Base Rate) 


$1 ,942 


$5,380 


Engineering 


2,230 


5,668 


Chemistry/Life Sciences 


2,192 


5.630 


Art, Architecture, Music 


2,142 


5,580 


Lib & Info Sci. 


2.192 


5,630 


PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 


RESIDENT 


NONRESIDENT 


LAW 


$3,617 


$8,804 


MASTER OF BUS. ADMIN 


$5,012 


$8,516 


MEDICINE 






First year 


$6,968 


$18,391 


Other 


5,968 


17,391 


NURSING 






Undergraduate 


$1,523 


$ 4,359 I $4,569 


Graduate 


2,820 


6,138 


VETERINARY MEDICINE 


$3,981 


$10,748 





FEES 

An asterisk (*) denotes fees for which a refund or exemption is available. 



TOTAL 


$589 


Service 


144 


Health Service 


141 


Health Insurance* 


127 


General 


136 


Transportation 


25 


Krannert* 


5 


SEAL*, SORF* 


11 



Graduate and professional students are assessed an additional $37 for 
health insurance. 



/ 998-99 SUMMER TUITION AND FEE SCHEDULE, FULL-TIME STUDENTS REGISTERED ON CAMPUS 

(SUBJECT TO CHANGE)* 

To be considered full-time, a student must be registered for 9 or more semester hours or for 2.25 or more units. Freshmen non-resident students 
pay the higher of the two rates listed for non-resident undergraduate students. Lower-division students are those with 0-59.9 semester hours of 
credit. Upper-division students have 60 or more semester hours of credit or are enrolled as nondegree. 



TUITION, EIGHT-WEEK SUMMER TERM 
UNDERGRADUATE 

Tuition (Base Rate) 

Engineering 

Chem./Life Sci. 

Art, Arch., Music (Lower) 

Art, Arch., Music (Upper) 



GRADUATE 

Tuition (Base Rate) 
Engineering 
Chem./Life Sci. 
Art, Arch., Music 
Lib & Info Sci. 



RESIDENT 


NONRESIDENT 


$1,065 


$2,902 


$3,195 


1,245 


3,082 


3,375 


1,222 


3,058 


3,352 


1,128 


2,964 


3,258 


1,190 


3,027 


3,320 


RESIDENT 


NONRE 


SIDENT 


$1,214 


$3,363 




1,394 


3,543 




1,370 


3,519 




1,339 


3,488 




1,370 


3,519 





FEES, EIGHT-WEEK SUMMER TERM 

An asterisk (*) denotes fees for which a refund or exemption is available. 

TOTAL $384 

Service 72 

Health Service 71 

Health Insurance* 127 

General 91 

Transportation 13 

Krannert 3 

SORF* 7 

Graduate and professional students are assessed an additional $37 for 
health insurance. 



LAW 

Tuition (1 1 wks.) 
Tuition (5'/2 wks.) 



RESIDENT NONRESIDENT 

$2,487 $6,053 

5 - 8 semester hours;1 .25 or more units 



$1,244 



$3,027 



Law fees, 1 1 -week Summer Session: $483 

Law fees, 5 Vfe -week Summer Session: $328 



§ For the most current information, and for detailed information concerning costs for part-time students and for the four-week summer session, visit 
the following Web site: http://www.uiuc.edu/providers/oar/rec_home.htrn 



STUDENT COSTS 



recreation field supervisors, health-education field supervisors, speech 
pathology supervisors, developmental child care field supervisors, 
educational psychology supervisors, continuing education supervi- 
sors, industrial relations field supervisors, and physicians participat- 
ing without salary in the instructional program of the University of 
Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. 

— Students on leave-of-absence status or reentry. 

— Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

WAIVER OF TUITION 

Tuition is waived for: 

— All faculty and academic professional employees (excluding gradu- 
ate assistants) of the University on appointment for at least 25 percent 
of full-time service, provided the appointments require service for not 
less than three-fourths of a term. This waiver also applies to employ- 
ees of certain specifically identified related agencies whose positions 
are considered equivalent to academic positions of the University. 

— Graduate teaching and research assistants of the University on 
appointment for at least 25 percent but not more than 67 percent of 
full-time service. Their appointments must require service for not less 
than three- fourths of the term. Those on appointment for 68 percent or 
more of full-time service pay tuition at the in-state rate and are eligible 
for waiver of the Service Fee only. Caution: Assistantship appoint- 
ments are cumulative. For example, if a person holds two appoint- 
ments, a 25-percent and a 50-percent assistantship appointment, he or 
she is ineligible for a tuition waiver. 

— Students holding appointments — as employees, graduate assis- 
tants, or fellows — to the close of the final term of an academic year, for 
whom tuition and/or the Service Fee have been provided through 
waiver, are entitled to a waiver of the same kinds of tuition and fees 
for the summer session or summer term immediately following, 
provided they hold no appointments during that summer session or 
term. Students holding summer session or summer term appoint- 
ments as fellows or as employees are subject to such tuition and fees 
as would be assessed in accordance with the principles expressed 
above. 

— Staff employees of the University, of any other institutions and 
agencies under the University Civil Service System, and of certain 
specifically identified related agencies in status appointments or in 
appointments designed to qualify for status in an established class 
(e.g., trainee, intern) for at least 50 percent of full-time services who 
register in regular University courses not to exceed: 

• Six credit hours or two courses in a semester if on full-time 
appointment, 

• Four credit hours if on a 75- to 99-percent time appointment, or 

• Three credit hours if on a 50- to 74-percent time appointment, 
provided they (1) meet conditions and eligibility for admission as 
prescribed by the Office of Admissions and Records, (2) are not 
students as defined in Civil Service Rule 7.7c, and (3) have approval by 
their employing departments of enrollment and of a makeup schedule 
to cover any time in course attendance during their regular work 
schedules. The waiver of tuition also applies to any additional hours 
of registration by staff employees that keep them within the same fee 
assessment credit range. Staff employees whose total registration is in 
a higher range than that authorized by their tuition waiver pay only 
the difference between the waiver authorization and the higher range 
in which their total registration places them. 

— Staff employees in status, learner, trainee, apprentice, or provi- 
sional appointments may enroll without payment of tuition in regular 
courses directly related to their University employment not to exceed 
10 credit hours per semester provided they have made application 
and received prior approval for enrollment as required by procedures 
issued by the director of Staff Human Resources and set forth in Policy 
and Rules — Staff. 

— Holders of tuition waiver scholarships. 

— Holders of graduate tuition and fee waivers awarded by the 
Graduate College. 

— University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

— Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors that provide 
payments to cover the total cost of instruction. 

— Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive assignment 
of practice teachers, who receive assignment of students meeting the 
clinical experience requirement in teacher education curricula, or who 
cooperate in research projects related to teacher education: one semes- 
ter, quarter, or summer session for each semester, quarter, or equiva- 
lent service rendered within two consecutive semesters. The waiver 



will apply to the semester, quarter, or summer session of registration, 
as designated by the student, that is concurrent with, or following, the 
term of service, but must be applied no later than one calendar year 
from the end of the term of service. Concurrent registration on more 
than one campus of the University or in University extramural courses 
constitutes one semester, quarter, or session of eligibility for waiver. 
A similar waiver is authorized for cooperating librarians, school- 
nurse teachers, social welfare field supervisors, developmental child 
care field supervisors, recreation field supervisors, health-education 
field supervisors, speech pathology supervisors, educational psychol- 
ogy supervisors, continuing education supervisors, industrial rela- 
tions field supervisors, and physicians who participate without salary 
in the instructional program of the University of Illinois College of 
Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. (Acceptance of more than one as- 
signment from any of the above listed offices during any one term will 
generate only one waiver.) 

— Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

— Eligible Illinois senior citizens. (Persons desiring information and / 
or an application for this waiver should contact the Office of Student 
Financial Aid, 620 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820.) 

— Children of eligible employees of state universities. 

WAIVER OF THE NONRESIDENT PORTION OF TUITION 

Nonresident portion of tuition is waived for: 

— Employees on appointment for at least 25 percent of full-time 
service with the University or with specifically identified related 
agencies, provided the appointment requires service for not less than 
three-fourths of the term. 

— The faculties of state-supported institutions of higher education in 
Illinois holding appointments of at least one-fourth time, provided the 
appointments require service for not less than three-fourths of the 
term. 

— The teaching and professional staff in the private and public 
elementary and secondary schools in Illinois (such as counselors, 
school psychologists, school social workers, librarians, and adminis- 
trators) who hold such appointments at least one-fourth time, and for 
not less than three-fourths of the term. 

— The spouses and dependent children of employees on appoint- 
ment with the University or certain specifically identified related 
agencies for at least 25 percent of full-time service, and of those listed 
in the second item above. (Dependent children are those who qualify 
as dependents for federal income tax purposes.) 

— The spouses and dependent children of fellows and trainees who 
are employed as teaching assistants to the fullest extent permitted by 
their fellowship appointments. 

— Persons actively serving in one of the armed forces of the United 
States who are stationed and present in the state of Illinois in connec- 
tion with that service and their spouses and dependent children, as 
long as the military persons remain stationed, present, and living in 
this state. 

SERVICE FEE WAIVERS AND EXEMPTIONS 

The Service Fee is waived for: 

1. Graduate teaching and research assistants holding at least 25 
percent appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the 
section on tuition. 

2. Foreign exchange students with Service Fee waivers as part of 
exchange contracts. 

3. Holders of Graduate College Service Fee waivers. 

4. Law students with Service Fee waivers. 

5. Participants in the International Exchange Program in Agricul- 
ture. 

6. Participants in the Bridge Program. 

7. Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

8. CIC Scholars. 

9. University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield students in concur- 
rent enrollment. 

10. Department of Children and Family Services dependents. 

Exempt from the Service Fee are: 

1. Students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV only in 
summer session). 

2. Students registered in absentia. 

3. Students registered in study-abroad programs. 

4. Students registered as participants in the official high school 
concurrent enrollment program. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



22 



5. Students registered in recognized off-campus programs. 

6. Faculty and academic employees holding at least 25-percent-time 
appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on 
tuition. 

7. Staff employees holding at least 50-percent-time appointments for 
three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on tuition. 

8. Faculty, academic, and staff employees of specifically identified 
related agencies. 

9. Interinstitutional staff employees. 

10. Cooperating teachers, administrators, and field supervisors, as 
defined in the section on tuition. 

1 1 . Employees (as defined in items 7 and 8 above) holding combined 
appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield. 

12. University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

GENERAL FEE WAIVERS AND EXEMPTIONS 

The General Fee is waived for: 

1. CIC Scholars. 

2. University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield students in concur- 
rent enrollment. 

3. Department of Children and Family Services dependents. 

4. Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

Exempt from the General Fee are: 

1. Faculty and academic employees holding at least 25-percent-time 
appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on 
tuition. 

2. Staff employees holding at least 50-percent-time appointments for 
three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on tuition. 

3. Faculty, academic, and staff employees of specifically identified 
related agencies. 

4. Interinstitutional staff employees. 

5. Cooperating teachers, administrators, and field supervisors, as 
defined in the section on tuition. 

6. Employees (as defined in items 1 and 2 above) holding combined 
appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield. 

7. University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

HEALTH SERVICE FEE WAIVERS AND EXEMPTIONS 

The Health Service Fee is waived for: 

1. CIC Scholars. 

2. University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield students in concur- 
rent enrollment. 

3. Department of Children and Family Services dependents. 

4. Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

Exempt from the Health Service Fee are: 

1. Students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV only in 
summer session). 

2. Students registered in absentia. 

3. Students registered in study-abroad programs. 

4. Students registered as participants in the official high school 
concurrent enrollment program. 

5. Students registered in recognized off-campus programs. 

6. Faculty and academic employees holding at least 25-percent-time 
appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on 
tuition. 

7. Staff employees holding at least 50-percent-time appointments for 
three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on tuition. 

8. Faculty, academic, and staff employees of specifically identified 
related agencies. 

9. Interinstitutional staff employees. 

10. Cooperating teachers, administrators, and field supervisors, as 
defined in the section on tuition. 

11. Employees (as defined in items 7 and 8 above) holding combined 
appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield. 

12. University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

13. University staff employees registered as students but eligible for 
the mandatory State of Illinois Employees Insurance Program. 

TRANSPORTATION FEE WAIVERS AND EXEMPTIONS 

The Transportation Fee is waived for: 

1. CIC Scholars. 

2. University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield students in concur- 
rent enrollment. 



3. Department of Children and Family Services dependents. 

4. Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

Exempt from the Transportation Fee are: 

1. Students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or TV (Range IV only in 
summer session). 

2. Students registered in absentia. 

3. Students registered in study-abroad programs. 

4. Students registered as participants in the official high school 
concurrent enrollment program. 

5. Students registered in recognized off-campus programs. 

6. Faculty and academic employees holding at least 25-percent-time 
appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on 
tuition. 

7. Staff employees holding at least 50-percent-time appointments for 
three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on tuition. 

8. Faculty, academic, and staff employees of specifically identified 
related agencies. 

9. Interinstitutional staff employees. 

10. Cooperating teachers, administrators, and field supervisors, as 
defined in the section on tuition. 

11. Employees (as defined in items 7 and 8 above) holding combined 
appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield . 

12. University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

SEAL, SORF, AND KCPA WAIVERS AND EXEMPTIONS 

The SEAL, SORF, and KCPA Fees are waived for: 

1. CIC Scholars. 

2. University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield students in concur- 
rent enrollment. 

3. Department of Children and Family Services dependents. 

4. Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

Exempt from the SEAL, SORF, and KCPA Fees are: 

1. Students enrolled in Credit Ranges III or IV (Range IV only in 
summer session). 

2. Students registered in absentia. 

3. Students registered in study-abroad programs. 

4. Students registered as participants in the official high school 
concurrent enrollment program. 

5. Students registered in recognized off-campus programs. 

6. Faculty and academic employees holding at least 25-percent-time 
appointments for three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on 
tuition. 

7. Staff employees holding at least 50-percent-time appointments for 
three-fourths of a term, as defined in the section on tuition. 

8. Faculty, academic, and staff employees of specifically identified 
related agencies. 

9. Interinstitutional staff employees. 

10. Cooperating teachers, administrators, and field supervisors, as 
defined in the section on tuition. 

11. Employees (as defined in items 7 and 8 above) holding combined 
appointments with the University of Illinois at Chicago or Springfield . 

12. University of Illinois faculty, academic, and staff retirees. 

STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE FEE 

Students totally exempt from payment of the Student Health Insur- 
ance Fee and therefore not eligible for these benefits and services are: 

— Persons registered for doctoral thesis research in absentia. 

— Persons registered in of f -campus courses and study-abroad courses 
for zero credit. (If registered for more than zero credit, they are 
required to pay this fee.) 

— University employees registered at the request of their depart- 
ments in zero-credit courses especially established to improve their 
work. 

— Employees who are registered as students but who are eligible for 
and participate in the mandatory State of Illinois Employees Insur- 
ance Program. 

— Employees of certain specifically identified related agencies who 
are eligible automatically to receive hospital-medical coverage as an 
employment benefit at the cost of the employing agency. 

— Students presenting petitions and evidence of approved equiva- 
lent medical insurance coverage (See Student Health Insurance.) 

— Illinois Teacher of the Year recipients. 

— CIC Visiting Scholars and concurrent University of Illinois regis- 
trants. 



FINANCIAL AID 



23 



STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE 



The University Board of Trustees requires all students to be covered 
by health insurance through either a program provided by the Univer- 
sity or one determined to be equivalent to that offered by the Univer- 
sity. Tuition and fee waivers do not apply to the student insurance fee. 

The Student Insurance Office is permanently located at 807 South 
Wright Street, Suite 480, Champaign. For the semester periods when 
the Registration Service Center is open, an insurance station is oper- 
ated in the Illini Union for the first (fall) semester. During the times the 
Registration Service Center station is open, all exemptions, reinstate- 
ments, and applications for coverage must be made at that location. 
Students should consult the current Timetable for the dates and times 
of the Registration Service Center activities. 

Students registered in University classes for residence work are 
assessed a fee each registration to cover the cost of the program. A 
student presenting evidence of equivalent medical insurance cover- 
age (a copy of the insurance policy or a schedule of benefits) may be 
exempted from payment of this fee upon approval of a petition 
submitted IN PERSON at the Insurance Office (or other location 
specified in the current Timetable) by no later than the final date 
established each term for a refund of tuition and fees. A signed waiver 
and assumption of responsibility is also required. An exemption will 
continue in effect until such time as the student requests reinstatement 
to the plan, or does not respond to a periodic request to confirm that 
he/she continues to be covered by another health plan, or three 
consecutive semesters of non-registered status. (NOTE: summer term 
2 is a semester. ) Reinstatement may also be requested at any other time 
up to the last day of coverage for a semester or term. Reinstatement is 
guaranteed if application is within 31 days of the termination of other 
insurance; after 31 days, or at any other time, reinstatement is subject 
to approval of a statement of medical history. If medical history is 
approved, a pre-existing condition limitation will be applicable for the 
first 120 days of coverage. The premium is not prorated for a partial 
semester of coverage. 

— First (fall) semester coverage extends through the Friday before 
the first day of class for the second (spring) semester. 

— Second (spring) semester coverage extends through the Friday 
before the first day of class for the eight-week summer term 2. 

— Summer session coverage extends through the Friday before the 
first day of class for the first (fall) semester. 

Premium rates for each semester or term may be found in the 
respective Timetable. 

Married students may purchase student health insurance to cover 
spouses and dependent children upon application and payment of an 
additional premium at the Student Insurance Office location in the 
Registration Service Center while open. (The last day the Registration 
Service Center is open is the deadline to purchase dependent coverage 
for that semester /term.) Application and premium payments must be 
made for each semester or term. Premiums for spouses and children 
may not be charged to student accounts. 

Petitions for exemption or reinstatement, and applications for 
dependent or extension of coverage must be submitted IN PERSON. 
Therefore, any petitions and applications that are mailed to the 
Student Insurance Office or included with payments made by mail 
will be returned to the sender without action; such items must be 
resubmitted by the student in person within the stated deadline for the 
term in question. Students who fail to present this information before 
the Registration Service Center closes will be required to participate in 
the Student Health Insurance Program for that semester/term. For 
more information, call 217/333-0165 or visit our Web site at 
webster.uihr.uiuc.edu/students. 



Financial Aid 



Financial aid programs are designed to provide assistance to students 
who otherwise would not be able to pursue a postsecondary educa- 
tion. A basic principle of most aid programs is that students and their 
parents pay for an education according to their capabilities. Therefore, 
student financial aid programs are designed to supplement — not 
replace — a family's contribution toward educational costs. 

Even with relatively low tuition and fee charges, the cost of a 
college education still can be a financial burden for many families. 
(Estimated expenses for an undergraduate student at the University 



appear in Table 3 of the Tuition and Fee Schedule.) However, no 
student should fail to apply for admission because his or her family 
feels unable to pay the full cost of a college education. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid (Student Services Arcade 
Building, 620 E. John Street, Champaign IL 61820) administers most 
federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. If a family's resources are 
determined to be insufficient to meet necessary educational expenses, 
financial aid in the form of loans, employment, grants, and/or schol- 
arships may be made available to the student and his or her parent(s). 

Counselors in the Office of Student Financial Aid are available to 
help those seeking information on financial assistance. Office hours 
are from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, except on all- 
campus holidays. Students and their parents may call the office at 
(217) 333-0100 or visit its home page at http://www.odos.uiuc.edu/ 
osfa/. 

APPLYING FOR AID 

Students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA) to apply for all need-based financial aid administered by the 
Office of Student Financial Aid — including federal, state, and institu- 
tional grants, scholarships, loans, and work-study. Those continuing 
students who filed a FAFSA to apply for aid during the preceding 
academic year should receive a Renewal FAFSA directly from the 
federal processor around January or February prior to the academic 
year for which aid is desired. Students who are applying for aid for the 
first time should complete and submit to the federal processor a 
regular FAFSA. FAFSAs are available at most college or university 
financial aid offices, or from most high school guidance counselors 
and libraries. 

When completing the Renewal FAFSA or regular FAFSA, students 
should identify the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as the 
school to which the information on the FAFSA should be sent. In 
Section G, they should list Title IV Code: 001775; College Name: 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; College Address: 620 E. 
John Street; City: Champaign; State: IL. 

The University's preferential filing date for financial aid is mid- 
March prior to the academic year for which aid is desired. All requests 
for assistance filed by March 15 will be given equal consideration for 
campus-based aid (awards made by the Office of Student Financial 
Aid). Students who apply after March 15 will be considered only if 
funds are still available. Because eligibility for need-based financial 
aid depends upon a family's financial situation, which can change on 
an annual basis, students must reapply for financial aid each year. 

After a student completes a FAFSA, he or she should send it to the 
U.S. Department of Education's federal processor in the envelope 
provided with the application. Applying a needs-analysis formula to 
the information the student provides on the FAFSA, the federal 
processor will determine his or her Expected Family Contribution 
(EFC) — the amount that the federal processor calculates the student 
and his or her family should be able to contribute toward that 
student's college education during the academic year. The processing 
time usually takes four to six weeks from the time the processor 
receives your FAFSA. 

Upon determining the student's EFC, the federal processor will 
mail to him or her a Student Aid Report (SAR). The SAR explains how 
the EFC was calculated, as well as whether the student has been 
selected for a process called verification. Approximately 30 percent of 
all financial aid applicants are selected for verification and are re- 
quired to submit to the Office of Student Financial Aid copies of 
documents from which the Office can ensure the accuracy of the 
information provided on the FAFSA. (These documents include, but 
are not limited to, copies of the student's and / or his or her parents' tax 
returns). The student should read and follow any instructions on the 
front of the SAR. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid will receive the student's 
needs-analysis information from the federal processor electronically 
and will determine his or her financial need and eligibility for aid by 
subtracting his or her EFC from the estimated cost of attendance. 

The FAFSA offers students the opportunity to forward informa- 
tion to state agencies and other schools so that they may be considered 
for state and university aid as well as federal programs. To be 
considered for any aid administered by the student's state of resi- 
dence, the student should leave the response oval in Question 102 of 
the FAFSA blank. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



24 



A/0 NOTIFICATIONS 



After the Office of Student Financial Aid has received the student's 
data from the federal processor and calculated his or her financial 
need, it will determine the types and amounts of aid for which the 
student is eligible. Then the Office will send the student a Student 
Financial Aid Notification (also called an award letter). Students 
should read their Aid Notifications carefully and thoroughly, and 
follow any instructions. To receive aid without unnecessary delays, 
students need to follow through on each required procedure. 

SOURCES OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

There are several types of financial aid available. As the University's 
funds are limited, students should seek assistance provided by na- 
tional, state, and local organizations. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Most Universitv merit-based scholarships are awarded by academic 
departments or colleges. Usually, departments notify students if they 
are eligible to receive a scholarship on the basis of their academic 
records or admissions information. 

There are many scholarships that are offered and awarded by 
private corporations and nonprofit organizations each year. While it 
is the student's responsibility to search and apply for such scholar- 
ships, there are scholarship search services available to help. Two such 
sendees are the Illinois Student Assistance Commission's Higher 
EdNet service and an online service called FastWEB. For more informa- 
tion about both of these services, please see the Office of Student 
Financial Aid Web page (http://www.odos.uiuc.edu/osfa/). 

GRANTS 

The Office of Student Financial Aid automatically considers students 
for each of the grant programs it administers when the student applies 
for aid using the FAFSA. Students do not complete a separate applica- 
tion for these grants. 

Two major sources of financial assistance for undergraduate stu- 
dents are the Federal Pell Grant and the Illinois Student Assistance 
Commission (ISAC) Monetary Award Program (MAP) grant. For 
1997-98, Federal Pell Grant awards ranged from $400 to $2700 and 
ISAC MAP grants ranged from $300 to $4120. 

The Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant is a 
program distinct from the Federal Pell Grant. The federal government 
annually provides postsecondary institutions with allocations from 
which awards are made. During 1997-98, awards ranged from $100 to 
S2,500. 

Students for Equal Access to Learning (SEAL) and Student-to- 
Student Matching (STSM) grant programs are funded by voluntary 
student contributions and matching funds provided by the state 
through the Illinois Student Assistance Commission. Students at 
Urbana-Champaign initiated the SEAL program by referendum in 
1970 and have reaffirmed it every four years since then. STSM grants 
are awarded in accordance to rules prescribed by the Illinois Student 
AssistanceCommission. During academic year 1997-98, awards ranged 
from $100 to $1,000. 

EMPLOYMENT: A FORM OF SELF-HELP FINANCIAL AID 

The Office of Student Financial Aid offers employment assistance to 
University students seeking part-time work. The University employs 
more than 14,000 part-time student workers across campus. Each 
year, these students earn more than $11 million. Additionally, many 
students work in the community. 

Hourly wages for student workers vary according to the type of 
work and responsibilities involved, but equal at least minimum wage. 
Most jobs require from 10 to 15 hours of work per week. 

FEDERAL WORK-STUDY 

Federal Work-Study is a financial aid program that helps colleges and 
universities provide jobs for students. To participate in the program, 
a student must apply for financial aid and have a Federal Work-Study 
award as part of a financial aid package from the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 



STUDENT LOANS: ANOTHER FORM OF SELF-HELP 
FINANCIAL AID 

The Office of Student Financial aid offers University of Illinois Long- 
Term Loans and Federal Perkins Loans to students demonstrating 
considerable financial need. These loans carry an interest rate of 5 
percent and repayment is deferred until six months after the borrower 
ceases to be a full-time student. 

FEDERAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS 

The University of Illinois participates in the William D. Ford Federal 
Direct Student Loan program. Under the Direct Loan program, the 
University disburses loans directly to students through funds re- 
ceived from the federal government. All students who apply for 
financial aid using the FAFSA and who are enrolled at least half-time 
are automatically considered for Direct Loans by the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. 

Subsidized Direct Loans are available to students demonstrating 
financial need. The interest subsidy is paid by the federal government 
while the borrower is in school, and payments are deferred until six 
months after the borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. 
Based on year in school and financial need, students may borrow up 
to annual maximums set by the federal government. At the freshman 
level (under 30 credit hours), a student may borrow up to $2,625; at the 
sophomore level (31-59 credit hours), $3,500; and at the junior and 
senior levels (60+ credit hours), $5,500. The aggregate maximum that 
a student can borrow for undergraduate study is $23,000. The interest 
rate varies, but the maximum is 8.25 percent. 

Parents of dependent students can borrow a Federal Direct PLUS 
Loan through the Direct Loan program. For each dependent student, 
each year parents may borrow up to educational costs minus the 
amount of other aid the student receives. Payments begin while the 
student is still in school. The interest rate varies, but the maximum is 
9 percent. 

Graduate students and students who meet the federal government's 
definition of an independent student (defined on the FAFSA) gener- 
ally are eligible to borrow unsubsidized Direct Loans in addition to 
subsidized Direct Loans. While payments on the amount borrowed 
are deferred until the student borrower leaves school, and a relatively 
attractive interest rate (maximum 8.25 percent) is charged, interest 
accrues while the student is in school. Based on class level and the 
amount of any subsidized Direct Loans that the student is receiving, 
independent undergraduates may borrow up to the following annual 
amounts: freshman, $6,625; sophomore, $7,500; and juniors and se- 
niors, $10,500. 

SPECIALIZED AID PROGRAMS 

Although most guidelines for awarding financial aid to Urbana- 
Champaign students are determined by the Office of Student Finan- 
cial Aid, some aid programs are administered by groups and agencies 
to which the student applies directly. Such programs include the 
Illinois Veterans Grants, Illinois Department of Children and Family 
Services Assistance, Illinois Department of Rehabilitation Services, 
Children of Veterans Scholarships, General Assembly Scholarships, 
Illinois National Guard /Naval Militia Scholarships, Illinois Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Scholarships, and MIA-POW De- 
pendents Grants. For more information about these scholarships, 
students should visit the Office of Student Financial Aid home page at 
http: / / www.odos.uiuc.edu /osfa or contact the administering agency 
directly. 

SHORT-TERM LOANS 

To meet expenses in emergencies, undergraduates may borrow up to 
$200 for approximately 30 days or until the last day of instruction for 
the semester, whichever comes first. To make more money available 
to a maximum number of students, applicants should borrow as little 
as is necessary for as short a period of time as possible. A service fee 
of $3 is charged. The interest charge on overdue short-term loans is 18 
percent annually on the unpaid balance. 

Students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents should 
apply in person to the Office of Student Financial Aid. Students are 
required to provide their i-cards for identification. International stu- 
dents (noncitizens who are not in the United States as permanent 
residents) should contact the Office of International Student Affairs 
(510 E. Daniel Street, Champaign IL 61820) for information. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



25 



Precollege Programs 



PROGRAMS FOR FRESHMEN 



The University offers fall semester freshmen the opportunity to com- 
plete required testing in the spring and to become acquainted with the 
campus, and then to receive academic advising and complete registra- 
tion during a summer two-day period prior to the beginning of the fall 
semester. These opportunities are explained fully in the booklet Get 
Ready for Illinois, which is sent to all accepted applicants. 

Freshmen entering in the fall semester who do not participate in 
the placement testing and summer orientation /registration programs 
must complete their required testing, academic advising, and class 
scheduling during the week immediately preceding the start of classes. 
Thus, participation in the precollege sessions is strongly urged to 
ensure a smooth transition to the University environment. 

Precollege programs are not available for freshmen entering the 
University during the spring semester; they must complete required 
testing, academic advising, and registration during the week immedi- 
ately preceding the start of classes. 

PLACEMENT TESTING 

Placement tests are designed to help determine the levels at which 
students are best prepared to begin University study in particular 
subject areas. Scores of these tests are used for initial placement 
purposes only and are not recorded on student official academic 
records. The requirements for placement testing vary by college and 
curriculum, and the Get Ready for Illinois booklet provides full details 
on the required and optional tests. 

During March, April, and May, beginning freshmen who have 
been admitted to the fall semester come to either the Urbana- 
Champaign campus or to the University of Illinois at Chicago campus 
to participate in a one-day program of required testing. The tests taken 
during this day are the Rhetoric Essay Test, and placement tests in 
mathematics, chemistry, and foreign languages. These tests must be 
taken by admitted students if they had these subjects in high school, 
but have not received college credit for them, and intend to pursue 
these subjects at the University either as required or elective courses. 

Students who live outside of Illinois and more than 250 miles from 
Champaign-Urbana have the option of completing placement testing 
on the first day of the orientation/ registration program. 

An admitted freshman who fails to complete all required testing 
during the spring will be assessed a $25 late fee (amount subject to 
change) to take the tests immediately preceding the start of summer 
orientation if (1) the freshman is a resident of Illinois and (2) the Notice 
of Admission to the University is dated prior to May 1. 

ACADEMIC ADVISING AND ORIENTATION/REGISTRATION 

A student who has completed the testing required by his or her college 
may participate in the two-day orientation /registration program 
conducted at the Urbana-Champaign campus during June and July. 
During that period, the student has an opportunity to learn about the 
expectations of professors and the level of academic standards at the 
University, as well as the chance to interact with other entering 
students and currently enrolled University students. Additionally, 
the new student is able to receive his or her student identification card 
and to become acquainted with the physical arrangement of the 
campus, housing facilities, and many other facets of campus life. If 
interested, the student also has the opportunity to audition for band 
and receive information on joining choral groups during new student 
week. 

The student's stay culminates in a meeting with an academic 
adviser who provides information about academic opportunities and 
requirements and assists the student in selecting a schedule of courses 
for the fall semester. 

A program charge includes one night's accommodations, three 
meals, and program events. The program charge is waived for any 
student who received an admission application fee waiver based on 
extreme financial hardship. 

PROGRAMS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS 

New transfer students have the opportunity to register for the fall 
semester during a special one-day program held during the summer. 
At that time, the student meets with an academic adviser to discuss the 



transfer of credit for all previous college course work, to learn his or 
her status in terms of progress toward a degree from the University, 
and to select classes for the fall. The student also has the opportunity 
to meet in a small group with currently enrolled University students, 
to interact with other entering students, and to receive his or her 
student identification card. Each transfer student receives details of 
the advance enrollment program in the Get Ready for Illinois booklet 
mailed with the Notice of Admission. 

Transfer students entering the University during the spring se- 
mester must complete academic advising and registration during the 
week immediately preceding the start of classes. 

PROGRAM FOR PARENTS 

Parents of beginning freshmen are cordially invited and encouraged 
to accompany their sons and daughters to the campus for the summer 
program and to participate in a Parent Orientation Program. Through 
a variety of information sessions, parents will have the opportunity to 
meet and speak with campus administrators, faculty, students, and 
members of the Mothers and Dads Associations. A program charge 
includes one night's accommodations, three meals, and program 
events. Parents likewise may take advantage of the opportunity to 
tour the campus. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Questions concerning the precollege programs should be referred to: 

Precollege Coordinator 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

901 West Illinois Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-6427 

Special Programs 

Because of the comprehensive nature of the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, arrangements for talented and highly motivated 
students differ among the various colleges and departments. Gener- 
ally speaking, talented and highly motivated students are able to enter 
special courses or special sections of courses as freshmen and sopho- 
mores and are encouraged as juniors and seniors to participate in 
special programs for majors offered by the many departments. For 
details of these arrangements, see the descriptions in the college 
sections of this catalog. 

Policies and procedures regarding placement and proficiency 
examinations, the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), and 
the Advanced Placement Program are published in the current edition 
of Opportunities for Advanced Credit, a brochure available at college 
offices or by writing to the Office of Admissions and Records, Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 10 Henry Administration Build- 
ing, 506 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801, (217) 333-0302. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

The Advanced Placement Program, administered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board, is designed for high school students 
who are about to enter college and wish to demonstrate their readiness 
for courses more advanced than those usually studied in the freshman 
year. Advanced classes are offered in many high schools in one or 
more of the following subjects: American and comparative govern- 
ment and politics, art history, art studio, computer science, English 
language and composition, English literature and composition, French 
language, French literature, German language, Latin, Spanish lan- 
guage, Spanish literature, biology, chemistry, mathematics (calculus), 
micro- and macroeconomics, physics, psychology, music theory, sta- 
tistics, and social studies (American history and European history). A 
national examination in each subject, administered in May by the 
Educational Testing Service, is designed to measure the competence 
of students in terms of the point at which college study in that subject 
should begin. The University encourages high schools and their 
outstanding students to participate in this program. 

Examinations are prepared and graded by national committees of 
high school and college teachers. They are graded on the following 
scale: 5, high honors; 4, honors; 3, creditable; 2, pass; and 1, fail. Grade 
reports are sent to the universities each student specifies at the time of 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



26 



the examination. Each department within the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign has the option of granting, or not granting, col- 
lege credit and advanced placement on the basis of the board's grade. 
Transfer students should refer to the section on Acceptance of 
Nontraditional Transfer Credit for the policy on accepting credit 
earned through the Advanced Placement Program. 

Specific credit recommendations for beginning freshmen at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus are listed below. Assignment of credit 
for specific courses is dependent upon policies established by the 
individual departments and colleges and is subject to change upon 
annual review. This information is also available on the Web at http:/ 
www. oir.uiuc.edu/dme/pnp/appmemo. html. 

Art 

ART HISTORY 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for ARTHI 111 (4 semester hours) and ARTHI 

112 (4 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

ART STUDIO 

Portfolios must be submitted to the School of Art and Design for an evaluation 
in all studio areas. 

Computer Science 

COMPUTER SCIENCE A 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for C S 105 (3 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

NOTE: Tliis credit is for a Pascal version of the indicated course. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AB 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for C S 125 (3 semester hours). 
Scores of 2 receive credit for C S 105 (3 semester hours). 
NOTE: Tliis credit is for a Pascal version of the indicated course. 

Economics 

MICROECONOMICS 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for ECON 102 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

MACROECONOMICS 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for ECON 103 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 



English 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for RHET 105 (4 semester hours and exemption 
from the University Composition I requirement). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for ENGL 103 (3 semester hours) and RHET 105 

(4 semester hours and exemption from the University Composition I 

requirement). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 



Foreign Languages 



FRENCH LANGUAGE 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for FR 103 (4 semester hours), FR 104 (4 semester 

hours), FR 205 (3 semester hours), and FR 207 (3 semester hours). 

Scores of 3 receive credit for FR 103 (4 semester hours), FR 104 (4 semester 

hours), and FR 205 (3 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

FRENCH LITERATURE 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for FR 207 (3 semester hours) and FR 210 (3 

semester hours). 

Scores of 3 receive credit for FR 210 (3 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

GERMAN LANGUAGE 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for GER 103 (4 semester hours), GER 104 (4 

semester hours), and GER 211 (3 semester hours). 

Scores of 3 receive credit for GER 103 (4 semester hours) and GER 104 (4 

semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

LATIN 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit and placement as follows: 

Vergil examination: LAT 103 (4 semester hours), LAT 104 (4 semester hours), 

and 3 semester hours of General Latin Credit. 

Lyric examination: LAT 103 (4 semester hours), LAT 104 (4 semester hours), 

LAT 201 (3 semester hours), and 3 semester hours of General Latin Credit. 

Scores of 3 receive credit and placement as follows: 

Vergil examination: LAT 103 (4 semester hours) and LAT 104 (4 semester 

hours). 



Lyric examination: LAT 103 (4 semester hours), LAT 104 (4 semester hours), 
and 3 semester hours of General Latin Credit. 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

SPANISH LANGUAGE 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for SPAN 103, 104, and 200 (11 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

SPANISH LITERATURE 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for SPAN 103, 104, and 200 (11 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

Government 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for POL S 150 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for POL S 240 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 

BIOLOGY 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for BIOL 120 (5 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 receive credit for BIOL 100 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

CHEMISTRY 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive general chemistry credit (6 semester hours) and 

placement in CHEM 122 or 223, 224. 

Scores of 3 receive general chemistry credit (3 semester hours) and placement 

in CHEM 102 or 109. Students should take the departmental general chemistry 

proficiency examination. 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

MATHEMATICS 

Calculus AB 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for MATH 120 (5 semester hours) and 

placement in Mathematics 130. 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

Calculus BC 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for MATH 120 (5 semester hours) and MATH 

130 (3 semester hours) and placement in MATH 242. 

Scores of 2 receive credit for MATH 120 (5 semester hours) and placement in 

MATH 130. 

PHYSICS 

Physics B 

Under review for 1999/2000. 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for PHYCS 101 (5 semester hours) and PHYCS 

102 (5 semester hours). 

Scores of 3 make students eligible to enroll in PHYCS 101 or take a proficiency 

examination for that course. If an A or B grade is earned in the course or on the 

proficiency examination, credit will be awarded for PHYCS 101 and 102. 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 2. 

Physics C 

Scores of 5 and 4 will receive credit as follows: 

Part I— Mechanics: PHYCS 111 (4 semester hours). 

Part II — Electricity and Magnetism: PHYCS 112 (4 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

For additional information or to arrange to take a departmental proficiency 

examination, students should go to 233 Loomis Laboratory of Physics. 

STATISTICS 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for STAT 100 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

Music 

MUSIC THEORY 

A score of 5 receives credit for MUSIC 101 (3 semester hours). 
Credit is not given for scores of 4, 3, and 2. 



Psychology 



Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for PSYCH 100 (4 semester hours). 
Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 



Social Studies 



AMERICAN HISTORY 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for HIST 151 (3 semester hours) and HIST 152 

(3 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. Students should sign up in 309 

Gregory Hall for the History 151 and/or History 152 departmental proficiency 

exam. 

EUROPEAN HISTORY 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for HIST 112 (3 semester hours). 

Credit is not awarded for scores of 3 and 2. Students should sign up in 309 

Gregory Hall for the History 112 departmental proficiency exam. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



27 



INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMINATIONS 

The International Baccalaureate (IB) Program, sponsored by a Swiss 
foundation, offers a curriculum covering either the last two years of 
secondary education or the twelfth and thirteenth grades in a thirteen- 
grade system. Successful completion of the program is based on the 
completion of course work and passage of internationally prepared 
examinations. The examinations are written at two levels of study: 
High Level, administered after a minimum of 240 hours of teaching 
time in a subject; and Subsidiary Level, administered after a minimum 
of 160 hours of teaching time in a subject. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will award profi- 
ciency credit to new, continuing, and transfer students on the basis of 
scores from several International Baccalaureate examinations: anthro- 
pology, biology, chemistry, classics (Latin and Greek), economics, 
French, German, history, and philosophy. University departments 
establish policies for awarding proficiency credit and advanced place- 
ment for each score on the IB scale of 1 to 7. Those wishing to have such 
examination scores evaluated should request that official score tran- 
scripts be sent to the Division of Measurement and Evaluation, Uni- 
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 247 Armory Building, 505 
East Armory Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may accept, for 
transfer purposes, IB credit awarded by another institution if the 
transfer student meets two requirements: (1) the student must have 
earned at least 12 semester hours of graded college-level classroom 
credit at that same institution or campus, and (2) the student must 
have earned classroom credit for a more advanced course in the same 
subject area at that same institution. The advanced course must be 
fully acceptable under University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
transfer credit policies. Transfer students who have not met these 
requirements may request that official copies of their scores be sent to 
the Division of Measurement and Evaluation. Such scores will be 
evaluated using the same standards applied to the scores of continu- 
ing students at the University. 

The specific credit and placement policies for International Bacca- 
laureate examinations recognized by this campus are given below. 
This information is subject to change upon annual review by each 
department concerned. 

Anthropology 

High and Subsidiary Levels: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for Anthropology 
103 (4 semester hours). 

Biology 

High Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for BIOL 120 and 121 (10 semester 

hours). 

Subsidiary Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for BIOL 104 (4 semester 

hours). 

Chemistry 

High Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for CHEM 101 and either 
Chemistry 102B or CHEM 102P (8 semester hours). 
Subsidiary Level: No credit is granted. 

Classics — Latin 

High Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for LAT 103, 104, and 201 (11 
semester hours). 

Subsidiary Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for LAT 103 and 104 (8 
semester hours). 

Classics — Greek 

High Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for GRK 101, 102, and 201 (12 
semester hours). 

Subsidiary Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for GRK 101 and 102 (8 
semester hours). 

Economics 

High and Subsidiary Levels: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for ECON 102 and 
103 (6 semester hours). 

French 

High and Subsidiary Levels: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for FR 207 and 210 
(6 semester hours); scores of 5 receive credit for FR 210 (3 semester hours). 

German 

High and Subsidiary Levels: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for GER 211 and 
231 (6 semester hours). 



History 



High Level: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for HIST 112 and 152 (6 semester 

hours). 

Subsidiary Level: No credit is granted. 



Philosophy 



High and Subsidiary Levels: Scores of 7 and 6 receive credit for PHIL 101 
(3 semester hours). 



PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 



Proficiency examinations are offered in most courses open to fresh- 
men and sophomores. A student may take proficiency examinations 
in more advanced undergraduate courses on recommendation of the 
head or chairperson of the department in which the course is offered 
and approval of the dean of the student's college. Departmental 
proficiency examinations are administered in individual sessions or 
scheduled group sessions during the semester. Departmental offices 
can provide information regarding test dates, places of administra- 
tion, types of examination, and references that might be used when 
preparing for examinations. Course descriptions and prerequisites 
are listed in the Courses catalog. (See the inside back cover of this 
publication for locations at which the Courses catalog may be ob- 
tained.) Proficiency examinations are generally given without cost to 
students, but fees may be charged to defray the cost of proficiency 
examinations prepared by agencies outside the University. 

All regulations governing proficiency examinations will be ap- 
plied in the context that the University must reasonably accommodate 
a student's religious beliefs, observances, and practices in regard to 
scheduling of proficiency examinations if the student informs the 
person responsible for the scheduling of such examinations of the 
conflict within one week after being informed of the examination 
schedule. Any student may appeal an adverse decision. 

An enrolled undergraduate student who passes a proficiency 
examination is given credit toward graduation for the amount regu- 
larly allowed in the course ( 1 ) if it does not duplicate credit counted for 
admission to the University or credit earned through some other 
testing program and (2) if it is acceptable in the student's curriculum. 
No official record is made of failures in these examinations, but some 
departments may keep records to prohibit students from retaking the 
examinations. General campus policy information regarding profi- 
ciency examinations can be found in the Code of Policies and Regulations 
Applying to All Students. 

Transfer students should consult the Admission for Transfer Ap- 
plicants section for the policy on acceptance of proficiency credit for 
admission purposes. 

COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

This program exists for the purpose of awarding proficiency credit, or 
otherwise recognizing college-level competence achieved outside the 
college classroom. Two types of tests are available: (1) the general 
examination covers the broad content of a study that might be ex- 
pected to be covered by several introductory-level courses, and (2) the 
subject matter examination covers the specific content of a single 
college course. Credit can be earned and will be recognized by the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for some CLEP General 
Examinations, but credit is not awarded for any of the CLEP Subject 
Matter Examinations. 

Most students must fulfill general education requirements for 
degree purposes in four areas: humanities, social science/history, 
biological science, and physical science. CLEP General Examinations 
in humanities and social science can be used to earn waivers of the 
corresponding general education requirements, or parts of them, and 
to earn degree credit. Credit is not awarded by the University for 
scores from the CLEP General Examinations in English composition, 
mathematics, or natural science. A CLEP test provides an opportunity 
for a student to demonstrate knowledge in a general subject area that 
is as thorough as that required of a graduate who has not majored in 
that particular area. General education requirements are designed to 
ensure that graduates of the University are generalists as well as 
specialists. The University recognizes that this general knowledge 
may have been acquired by entering students through high school 
work, independent study, extracurricular reading, projects, or work 
experience. CLEP General Examination scores can be used to earn 3 or 
6 credit hours and waiver of all or part of the requirement in each of 
the two general education areas. College policies vary in terms of the 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



28 



tests that are acceptable for earning credit and waiver, and in terms of 
the scores required for partial or complete waiver of a requirement. 

Students may take CLEP examinations at any CLEP National 
Testing Center designated by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), 
Box 966, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. Official score reports should be 
sent by ETS to Coordinator, Placement and Proficiency Testing, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 247 Armory Building, 
505 East Armorv Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820. Locations of CLEP 
National Testing Centers and test administration dates may be ob- 
tained bv writing to ETS, or by inquiring at most college and high 
school counseling offices. 

CLEP test scores earned by beginning freshmen at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus, including students with less than 12 semester 
hours of transferable classroom credit attempted at other collegiate 
institutions, are evaluated for credit according to norms established 
for the campus. Transfer students should refer to the section on 
Acceptance of Nontraditional Transfer Credit for the policy on accept- 
ing credit earned through CLEP examinations. 

CLEP examination scores reported by the Defense Activity for 
Non-Traditional Education Support (DANTES) testing centers will be 
evaluated against the same criteria that are applied to continuing 
students on the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

CAMPUS HONORS PROGRAM 

The Campus Honors Program (CHP) offers special challenges and 
opportunities to a small number of academically talented and highly 
motivated undergraduate students. It fosters collaborative relation- 
ships between students and distinguished faculty through small 
intensive classes, a faculty mentor system for introducing students to 
the intellectual standards and methodologies of academic disciplines, 
and informal contacts encouraged by cocurricular offerings. CHP 
sponsors four series of noncredit cocurricular events: a "Scholar 
Adventurers" lecture series on faculty research; a "Study Abroad at 
Home" series of seminar- workshops centering on other cultures; a 
series of dress-rehearsal visits at Krannert Center for the Performing 
Arts; and an "International Tasting Club" lunch series. The aim is to 
encourage breadth and excellence from the outset of the student's 
college career, and to facilitate interaction with scholars at the cutting 
edge of their disciplines. 

Only approximately 125 new students can be admitted to the CHP 
each year as first-year students. A few additional students, however, 
may join the program on an off-cycle basis at the beginning of the 
sophomore year. Designated as Chancellor's Scholars, CHP students 
may be enrolled in any undergraduate curriculum. Those who meet 
retention requirements continue as Chancellor's Scholars throughout 
their undergraduate career. Required CHP course work is concen- 
trated in the freshman and sophomore years when students take 
intensive and specialized versions of general education courses. At 
the junior and senior level, when students are necessarily involved in 
their majors, they are required to take one advanced CHP seminar. In 
short, the emphasis is on fundamental principles and interdiscipli- 
nary connections because the CHP is directed at students who desire 
an undergraduate education that is broad and general as well as 
professionally specialized. 

It is as important to understand what CHP is not, as to understand 
what it is. CHP courses represent additional opportunities for aca- 
demically gifted and adventurous students; they are not an alternative 
curriculum. Basically, they provide an honors-quality way of satisfy- 
ing general education requirements for graduation and of helping 
students to discover the interrelations between their own discipline 
and other disciplines. Nor does CHP supplant or conflict with depart- 
mental honors programs. In consultation with their departmental 
academic advisers, Chancellor's Scholars develop their own combina- 
tion of regular and CHP courses. Accordingly, most of the courses 
CHP students take are regular University offerings. 

Most importantly, CHP is a challenge. A Chancellor's Scholar 
must make a special commitment to the intellectual life, and to the 
dialogue and community in the Honors House. 

BENEFITS 

As a small general studies program within a large state university, the 
Campus Honors Program seeks to combine the advantages of a major 
public institution with those of a small liberal arts college. Opportuni- 
ties offered by the program include: 



— Challenging courses designed especially for CHP students, with 
limited enrollment (usually fifteen students or fewer); 

— Summer grants to fund student research projects ($1,000) and to 
support student domestic and foreign travel ($500 and $1,000, 
respectively); 

— A variety of social and intellectual activities outside the classroom, 
including cultural events and seminars on topics of interest; 

— Access to the University Library stacks; 

— Transcript notation of Chancellor's Scholar status; 

— Access to computer facilities in the Honors House and to a special 
communications electronic bulletin board; 

— Orientation and senior sibling programs for incoming students; 

— Honors House, the honors student center, which offers an atmo- 
sphere conducive to study and relaxation; 

— Priority registration for classes; and 

— Interaction with an outstanding group of peers. 

ADMISSION 

Entering freshmen with high ACT/SAT scores and exceptional high 
school records are invited by CHP to apply for admission to the 
program, but any incoming or currently enrolled freshman may ask to 
be considered. Acceptance is based upon such factors as standardized 
test scores, high school class rank and grade point average, evidence 
of creative and leadership abilities as displayed in extracurricular 
interests and activities, the strength of application essays, and evi- 
dence of willingness to accept CHP challenges and contribute to the 
program. The Honors Program is open to students in all majors 
offered on the Urbana-Champaign campus, and an effort is made to 
ensure that each incoming class of Chancellor's Scholars is broadly 
representative of the curricula of the University as a whole. Students 
who are strongly motivated not only to excel, but also to make a 
difference at Illinois are sought for Chancellor's Scholars. 

For additional information or to obtain an application form, con- 
tact the Campus Honors Program, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 1205 West Oregon Street, Urbana, IL 61801; (217) 244- 
0922. For full consideration, completed applications should be re- 
ceived by February 1 for admission the following fall. 

EDMUND}. JAMES UNDERGRADUATE HONORS 
PROGRAMS 

Undergraduate honors programs, named for one of the University's 
distinguished presidents, Edmund J. James, provide a number of 
special curricular opportunities to academically talented undergradu- 
ate students. Designation by the University as "James Scholars" 
recognizes students of extraordinary ability and achievement. It en- 
titles students to certain academic privileges, including the extended 
use of library facilities, and charges them with the responsibility for 
seeking sustained intellectual achievement throughout their under- 
graduate careers. James Scholar honors students are characterized by 
outstanding academic records; high general aptitudes for college 
work; and reputations for seriousness of purpose, persistence, and 
self -discipline in educational endeavors. 

Students enrolled in any undergraduate curriculum may elect to 
participate in the program; special academic arrangements are open to 
James Scholar honors students in all courses of study. These arrange- 
ments include provision of honors courses and sections, special semi- 
nars, and interdisciplinary colloquia. In addition, James Scholars are 
encouraged to pursue individual scholarly interests through indepen- 
dent study and research projects. There is no monetary award associ- 
ated with this program, and students who need financial assistance 
should apply to the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

NOMINATION PROCEDURES 

Academic requirements for participation in the program are deter- 
mined by the respective colleges. Undergraduates in most colleges 
may "self-nominate" into the program, provided that the decision is 
based on prior achievement and on high school and college faculty or 
administrative advice, and is accomplished prior to the terminal dates 
set for entry into academic programs leading to honors degrees. In the 
Colleges of Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Commerce and 
Business Administration, entering students with higher than a prede- 
termined college selection index are automatically admitted as James 
Scholar Designates. Students may elect to leave the program or may 
be removed for failure to meet standards of academic performance in 
the various colleges. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



29 



During summer orientation/registration, freshmen in most col- 
leges will receive additional information regarding specific college 
programs leading to honors degrees. At that time, in consultation with 
an adviser, a student may self-nominate into the program and select 
an honors course or plan other honors activities. 

Although the honors program in each college varies in detail, any 
incoming freshman electing to undertake an honors program will 
enter the University as a James Scholar Designate. After completion of 
a period on campus, each designate's record will be reviewed by his 
or her college. The student then will be invited to continue annual 
certification as a James Scholar honors student or advised to leave the 
program on the basis of criteria developed by the college. Resident and 
transfer students wishing to self-nominate into the program should 
inquire at their college offices. 

JAMES SCHOLAR RECOGNITION 

Successful performance for one year as a James Scholar honors stu- 
dent is recognized and recorded on the student's University record as 
Edmund J. James Scholar (year). 

Specific inquiries regarding the honors program of a particular 
college may be addressed to the college office in care of the honors 
dean. 

HONORS CREDIT LEARNING AGREEMENTS 

It is not expected that a James Scholar honors student will take a full 
schedule of special courses; however, at least one honors activity each 
semester is considered normal. To encourage sustained independent 
intellectual activity by superior students, the campuswide Honors 
Credit Learning Agreement Program enables students to earn offi- 
cially recognized honors credit in regular undergraduate courses. 
This is accomplished by a learning agreement between student and 
instructor whereby the student undertakes a special course-related 
project. Upon successful completion of the project, the student is 
awarded transcript-designated honors credit for the course. Forms for 
initiation of honors credit learning agreements are available in the 
college offices. 

TRANSITION PROGRAM 

Established in 1986, the Transition Program is a campus-sponsored 
academic support program designed to provide assistance to a group 
of 100 students admitted each year who have academic weaknesses 
that could place them "at risk" if they were permitted to enter the 
University without such assistance. The goal of the program is to 
provide students with a home base where they feel comfortable about 
asking questions, expressing their concerns, and receiving the sup- 
port, advice, and encouragement they need to be academically suc- 
cessful at, and to graduate from, the University of Illinois. Students are 
consistently encouraged to succeed; more important, they are shown 
how to succeed in the college classroom. 

These bright and talented students are admitted to the University 
through the Educational Opportunities Program and placed in the 
Transition Program, housed in the College of Liberal Arts and Sci- 
ences, where they will receive developmental academic support for 
two years. After a student has successfully completed four semesters 
in the Transition Program, an admission space is reserved in the 
college and / or curriculum of his or her choice, if the student is in good 
academic standing (C average or better) and has completed the 
required core courses for admission to that college and /or curricu- 
lum. 

The Transition Program is divided into two major components — 
the Summer Bridge component and an academic year component. 
Both components provide the student with: 

1. Intensive academic and career counseling. 

2. Extensive academic and personal support services plus opportu- 
nities to enroll in support-based sections of existing courses. 

3. Comprehensive developmental skills as well as enhancement and 
enrichment activities. 

Only those students who officially apply to the University in the 
standard manner prescribed by the Office of Admissions and Records 
and who meet established campus and program deadlines for appli- 
cation will be considered for admission and placement in the Transi- 
tion Program. The final decision on which students will be admitted 
and placed in the Transition Program is the joint responsibility of the 
director of the Office of Admissions and Records and the director of 



the Transition Program, acting on behalf of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

GENERAL CRITERIA FOR PLACEMENT IN THE TRANSITION 
PROGRAM 

An applicant with a score of 17 or lower on the ACT English subtest 
area (320 on the SAT Verbal subtest area) or a score of 17 or lower on 
the ACT mathematics subtest area (350 on the SAT Math subtest area) 
is eligible for admission consideration through participation in the 
Educational Opportunities Program and placement in the Transition 
Program. In some cases, an interview with a Transition Program staff 
member may be required before an admission decision can be reached . 

BRIDGE ADMISSION 

An applicant with a score of 15 or lower on the ACT English subtest 
area or a score of 16 or lower on the ACT mathematics subtest area is 
eligible for admission consideration only through participation in the 
Educational Opportunities Program and placement in the Summer 
Bridge component of the Transition Program, unless there is strong 
evidence that participation in Summer Bridge is not necessary for the 
applicant's success. (Other applicants may be invited or required to 
participate in the Transition Program or the Summer Bridge compo- 
nent if, in the judgment of the director of the Office of Admissions and 
Records and the director of the Transition Program, such participation 
is necessary for the applicants' success at the University.) 

A student who meets Summer Bridge criteria will be required to 
complete placement tests designed for the Transition Program, fol- 
lowed by a personal interview with a program staff member before an 
admission decision can be reached. 

Eligibility of Summer Bridge participants to continue enrollment 
in the fall semester is contingent upon acceptable academic perfor- 
mance in the summer program and recommendation by the director 
of the Transition Program. 

THE SUMMER BRIDGE COMPONENT 

Each summer, 50 of the 100 students selected for placement in the 
Transition Program are required to participate in a six-week residen- 
tial summer session on the UIUC campus sponsored by the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. The session engages these students in 
intensive course work in mathematics, composition, and basic skills 
development. In addition, Summer Bridge participants are provided 
with a variety of cultural enrichment activities and orientation to 
University resources, support services, and campus living. 

The Summer Bridge experience is provided at no cost to the students. 
Each participant receives institutional financial assistance to cover the 
cost of tuition, room, board, and books. In addition, with the exception 
of students who will participate in intercollegiate athletics and who are not 
eligible for such added financial assistance under current National Collegiate 
Athletic Association regulations, each participant receives a stipend of a 
modest weekly allowance and a lump-sum payment at the end of the 
summer session. 

Each Summer Bridge participant must successfully complete all 
course work with a grade of C or better before gaining admission for 
the fall semester. The Bridge experience offers students an invaluable 
opportunity to get a head start on their undergraduate education and 
to make important adjustments to the multiple demands of college 
life, including learning the difference between getting by and getting 
ahead. At the end of Summer Bridge, each student fully understands 
the relationship between hard work and success in the college class- 
room; the summer experience makes a significant difference. 

THE ACADEMIC YEAR COMPONENT 

Each fall, the successful Summer Bridge participants join the 50 other 
newly admitted Transition Program students. Each of the 200 Transi- 
tion Program students (including 100 returning sophomores) is as- 
signed to an adviser who is a graduate or professional student at the 
University. Each graduate adviser is responsible for providing aca- 
demic, career, and personal counseling to a group of 20 students; each 
student is required to meet with his or her graduate adviser at least 
once a week. The graduate advisers, along with the director and 
assistant director of the program, carefully monitor the academic 
progress of the students daily to ensure their success. 

In cooperation with various departments and colleges on campus, 
the Transition Program sponsors special sections of existing courses 
that are tailored to meet the students' individual needs. These courses 
are small and allow for extensive teacher-student interaction; in 
addition, the instructors for these courses meet regularly with the 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



30 



program staff and submit weekly reports on the progress of the 
students. At no cost to the students, additional academic support is 
provided by the Office of Minority Student Affairs. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Additional information about the Transition Program may be ob- 
tained by contacting the office of the director of the Transition Pro- 
gram, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 270 Lincoln Hall, 702 South 
Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801, (217) 244-1588 or 1-800-TOP-BEST 
(867-2378). 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM 

GENERAL NATURE AND PURPOSE 

The Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) was established in 
1968. It is administered by the Office of Minority Student Affairs and 
it provides academic services and counseling support to students who 
(1) have high potential but are academically underprepared for their 
major area or (2) come from backgrounds that are underrepresented 
on the Urbana campus. The program's emphasis is on supporting 
incoming students identified by the Office of Admissions and Records 
and college offices as being academically at risk in their preferred 
curricula. 

Students admitted through the program, along with many other 
students, receive financial support from federal loans and grants, 
Illinois Student Assistance Commission Monetary Awards, and Uni- 
versity tuition waivers. They also contribute toward their expenses 
through family contributions, summer and part-time employment, 
and personal loans. Supportive services for the program are provided 
by federal and University funds. 

Through the Educational Opportunities Program, the University 
is attempting to: 

— Admit students who otherwise might not be able to undertake a 
college-level program at a major educational institution, and assist 
them in completing a baccalaureate degree. Participants receive the 
same benefits as other students and additional support if required. 

— Increase the number of students from ethnic minority groups 
underrepresented on campus and raise the retention and graduation 
rates of participants. 

— Develop educational programs and policies, both academic and 
administrative, that will assist and support students in the program 
and that may well benefit all students. 

— Provide students not in the program the vital cultural and social 
experience of meeting, living with, and learning from students from 
other cultures. 

— Add ethnic diversity to the campus and ensure that all participants 
have a high probability of graduating from UIUC. 

— Provide and disseminate to other educational institutions and 
agencies information that will increase their ability to deal with 
educational and sociological problems of students from nontradi- 
tional backgrounds. 

— Provide information on securing financial aid, student employ- 
ment, and postgraduate opportunities to program participants. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Admission to the Educational Opportunities Program is limited to 
applicants from Illinois who are educationally or economically disad- 
vantaged and who fall into one of the following categories: 

— Beginning freshmen who meet the high school subject pattern 
requirements and the high school rank and test score combinations 
prescribed for the colleges and curricula of their choice. 

— Students not meeting the stated academic requirements, if the 
deans of the colleges concerned and the director of admissions and 
records (or their designated representatives) concur. 

It should be noted that in some curricula, such as the performing arts 
and aviation, additional requirements must be met. 

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES 

Supportive services are available to help Educational Opportunities 
Program students meet a wide range of needs, as follows: 

— Extensive academic advising, taking into consideration students' 
past educational achievements, test results, abilities, and interests. 
The optimal class schedules and course selections are determined by 
students in consultation with special academic advisers in the various 
colleges. 



— Specially designed course offerings, including basic courses in 
rhetoric, mathematics, and special class sections in regular courses. 

— A Reading and Study Methods Clinic and Writing Laboratory to 
help improve reading, writing, and study skills. 

— A tutoring system conducted by the Office of Minority Student 
Affairs and students to help students in the program effectively 
approach and master subject content. 

— An office with a specially trained staff to provide academic, social, 
personal, financial, and career assistance and general counseling. 

— Precollege orientation programs to help students gain a greater 
awareness of the programs and services available at the University. 

APPLICATION 

Applicants for participation in the Educational Opportunities Pro- 
gram must submit complete admission applications and arrange for 
their high school transcripts and test scores to be sent to the Office of 
Admissions and Records. 

Application forms and additional information about the program 
may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. 

SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 

The Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services is the designated 
office of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign that obtains 
and files disability-related documents, certifies eligibility for disabil- 
ity services, determines reasonable accommodations, and develops 
plans for the provision of such accommodations for students and 
guests of the University with disabilities. Services offered by the 
Division include study skills consultation and training, academic and 
disability counseling, auxiliary aids (e.g., notetakers, lab or library 
assistance, interpreters, etc.), document conversion to alternative 
formats (e.g., Braille, tape, enlarged print, etc.), assistive listening 
devices, modified testing services, assistive computer technology, 
priority registration, time extensions, and numerous other services. 
For example, the Division offers physical therapy and functional 
training, housing for students requiring assistance in the performance 
of activities of daily living, accessible campus transportation, wheel- 
chair and equipment repair, financial aid assistance, and an interna- 
tionally acclaimed adapted sports program. The Division works closely 
with Campus Parking and the Housing Division to arrange appropri- 
ate housing and parking for students with disabilities. 

Prospective students are urged to contact the Division to request 
information about services and resources, and are strongly encour- 
aged to visit the campus and the Division of Rehabilitation-Education 
Services well in advance of enrollment to plan for their needs. The 
Division is located at 1207 South Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820; 
(217) 333-4603 (V/TDD); Fax (217) 333-0248. 

COURSE ATTENDANCE BY ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL 
STUDENTS 

Qualified local high school students are permitted, while in high 
school, to attend University classes for college credit. They may also 
enroll for college credit in correspondence and extramural courses 
offered by the University. 

To qualify for high school and on-campus University concurrent 
enrollment, a student must be recommended by his or her high school 
principal and have a 3.5 (A = 4.0) grade point average and have 
prerequisite courses completed. Students are assessed tuition at the 
regular undergraduate nondegree student rates. 

Courses taken by these students involve work over and above the 
secondary school curriculum. Grades and course credits will appear 
on their permanent University records and on official transcripts. If 
these students enter the University after high school graduation, the 
courses, if applicable, will be credited toward University graduation. 

A student applying for on-campus admission under this program 
should be prepared to submit the following materials upon request: 

— A nondegree application for admission to the University (not 
required of students who were previously enrolled under this plan). 

— An official copy of the high school transcript covering all work 
completed in high school and courses in progress, together with ACT 
or SAT test score if available. Acceptance under this program does not 
guarantee later acceptance as a degree candidate. 

Information and applications for this program may be obtained 
from the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on the inside 
back cover. A separate undergraduate admission application is re- 



GRADING SYSTEM AND OTHER REGULATIONS 



31 



quired if a student desires to attend the University after high school 
graduation or under the Early Admission Program described in the 
next section. 

A student interested in correspondence study should request 
information and an application form from Guided Individual Study, 
UIUC, Suite 1406, 302 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. It is 
suggested that students begin correspondence study to coincide with 
the start of a fall or spring semester at the University. Applications 
should be submitted before the beginning of a semester. For the 
summer session, applications should be submitted by the middle of 
May. 

EARLY ADMISSION PROGRAM 

Under the Early Admission Program, a high school student meeting 
competitive admission requirements except receipt of a high school 
diploma may be enrolled in the University before graduating from high 
school. Although each application is treated as a special admission 
case, a prospective student must be at least 15 years of age by the time 
of desired term of enrollment, have earned 15 units toward a high 
school diploma, be in good academic standing, and be recommended 
by a high school staff member who is able to evaluate the student's 
work, and meet competitive admission standards. Those accepted in 
the program are enrolled in regular four-year curricula and treated as 
first-year students. 

A student interested in this program may apply for admission no 
sooner than January preceding the fall term of planned entry so that 
the application can include complete information about the student's 
fall semester. However, application should be completed as soon as 
possible after January 1. 

For complete information, contact the Office of Admissions and 
Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

DELAYED ADMISSION 

A person approved for admission may request that the admission be 
delayed for a maximum of one year to allow participation in nonaca- 
demic pursuits. An applicant who wishes to consider this alternative 
should request further information from the Office of Admissions and 
Records at the time that he or she accepts the admission offer since the 
program is limited. 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT WITH PARKLAND 

A student in good academic standing at Parkland College or at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign may concurrently enroll 
in courses offered by the other institution if such courses are not 
available at the student's primary campus. Prior written approval for 
concurrent enrollment must be obtained from the dean of students at 
Parkland College and the appropriate college office at the University 
campus. 

Generally, concurrent enrollees must take fewer hours at the 
secondary institution than at the primary institution. Concurrent 
enrollees are part-time nondegree students at the secondary institu- 
tion and pay the tuition and fees regularly assessed at that institution 
in accordance with the amount of work taken. The application fee is 
waived. 

STUDY AWAY FROM CAMPUS 

The University permits a student who has been enrolled on campus 
for at least a semester or summer session, with the approval of the 
student's adviser and the appropriate departmental and college of- 
fices, to undertake independent study away from campus either in the 
United States or abroad. 

Colleges and departments may establish variable credit courses 
that permit students, upon payment of an appropriate fee, to continue 
enrollment in the University while studying away from campus. Final 
determination of credit is made by the department and college con- 
cerned. 

Overseas study programs offered by each college are described in 
the individual college sections of this catalog. 



Grading System and Other Regulations 

Academic, administrative, and conduct regulations are published in 
the Code of Policies and Regulations Applying to All Students. Students are 
responsible for complying with these regulations of the University 
and those of the colleges and departments from which they take 
courses. This publication is available to students in the lobby of the 
Turner Student Services Building, at the Admissions and Records 
Building, and at the Information Desk in the Illini Union. The Code is 
also available on the World Wide Web at http://www.uiuc.edu/ 
admin_manual/code. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Faculty members are responsible for providing the University with an 
individual evaluation of the work of each student in their classes. Final 
course grades are entered on the student's permanent University 
record at the close of each semester, term, or session. The University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign uses the following grading system: 
A = excellent; B = good; C = fair; D = poor (lowest passing grade); F = 
failure, including courses dropped for academic irregularities; Ab = 
absent from the final examination without an acceptable excuse 
(counts as a failure). If a student is absent from a final examination and 
it is clear that taking the examination could not have resulted in a 
passing grade for the course, a grade of F may be given instead of Ab. 
In addition to the above grades, instructors are authorized to assign 
plus and minus grades. 

COMPUTATION OF SCHOLASTIC AVERAGES 

For numerical computation of scholastic averages, the following 
values are designated: A+ = 4.0; A = 4.0; A- = 3.67; B+ = 3.33; B = 3.0; 
B- = 2.67; C+ = 2.33; C = 2.0; C- = 1.67; D+ = 1.33; D = 1.0; D- = 0.67; 
F = 0.0. 

UNIFORM METHOD FOR CALCULATION 

A uniform method for calculating undergraduate grade point aver- 
ages has been established for all undergraduate colleges on the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. These averages are calculated on the 
basis of all courses attempted for which grades and credits are 
assigned and that carry credit in accordance with the Courses catalog. 
Since courses offered by the religious foundations on or near the 
Urbana-Champaign campus are not official University courses and 
are not included in the Courses catalog, the grades earned in such 
courses will not be included in the calculation of any grade point 
averages. Grades of S, U, CR, NC, and Pass (see next section on Other 
Symbols in Use) are reported on official University transcripts but are 
not included in grade point averages since grade-points are not 
assigned to these letter grades. This method of calculation is used to 
determine honors, probation and drop status, financial aid and scho- 
lastic awards, and transfer between colleges on this campus. 

For the purpose of computing a grade point average for gradua- 
tion, only the grades received in those courses counting toward the 
degree, including grades in repeated courses, are included in the 
average. (See Grade-Point Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 
section.) 

For the special method used to determine eligibility for transfer 
into the University, refer to the transfer admission policy in the 
Admission of Transfer Applicants section. 

OTHER SYMBOLS IN USE (NOT INCLUDED IN THE 
COMPUTATION OF AVERAGES) 

W — Approved withdrawal without credit. 

EX — Temporarily excused. Approved extension of time to complete 
the final examination or other requirements of the course. 
Applies to both undergraduate and graduate students. Entitles 
the student to an examination later without fee, or additional 
time to complete other requirements of the course. (Only the 
dean of the student's college may authorize such an extension 
of time in an individual case. A grade of EX that is not removed 
by the end of the first eight weeks of instruction in the next 
semester in which the student is enrolled in an undergraduate 
college on the Urbana-Champaign campus automatically be- 
comes a grade of F. If the student receiving an excused grade 
does not reenroll on the Urbana-Champaign campus, the ex- 
cused grade, if not removed, becomes an F after one calendar 
year.) 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



32 



CR — Credit earned. To be used only in courses taken under the 
credit-no credit grading option. (Instructors report the usual 
letter grades. Grades of A+ through C- will automatically be 
converted to CR.) 
NC — No credit earned. To be used only in courses taken under the 
credit-no credit grading option. (Instructors report the usual 
letter grades. Grades of D+ through F, and Ab will automati- 
cally be converted to NC.) 
IP — Course in progress. 

Miss — Missing grade. Instructor has failed to submit a grade for the 
student. 
DF — Grade temporarily deferred. To be used only in those thesis, 
research, and special problems courses extending over more 
than one semester that are taken by graduate students as 
preparation for the thesis and by undergraduate students in 
satisfaction of the requirements for graduation with honors, 
and in other approved courses that extend over more than one 
semester. (Requests for use of the DF grade in courses that 
extend over more than one semester, and therefore require 
postponement of the final grade report, must be submitted in 
writing by the executive officer of the department offering the 
courses to the dean of the appropriate college for concurrence. 
A current list of courses that have received such approval is 
maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records.) 
S — Satisfactory, and 

U — Unsatisfactory. To be used only as final grades in graduate 
thesis research courses, in graduate and undergraduate courses 
given for zero credit, and in other courses that have been 
specifically approved by the head or the chairperson of the 
department concerned, with concurrence of the appropriate 
college dean. A current list of courses that have received such 
approval is maintained in the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Pass — Used for all test-based credit. A minimum grade of C- is 
required. 

CREDIT-NO CREDIT GRADING OPTION 

The credit-no credit grading option is designed to encourage students 
to explore areas of academic interest that they might otherwise avoid 
for fear of poor grades. All students considering this option are 
cautioned that many graduate and professional schools consider 
applicants whose transcripts bear a significant number of nongrade 
symbols less favorably than those whose transcripts contain none or 
very few. Likewise, in computing a preadmission grade point aver- 
age, some of these schools may convert the NC symbol into a failing 
grade since they do not know whether the actual grade was a D, F, or 
Ab. 

A full-time undergraduate student not on probation may, with the 
approval of his or her adviser, take a maximum of two courses each 
semester under the credit-no credit grading option. Part-time stu- 
dents may take one course each semester under this option. Summer 
term 1 and 2 students may take one course under the credit-no credit 
option. 

A maximum of 18 semester hours earned under the credit-no 
credit grading option may be applied toward a baccalaureate degree 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University. A correspon- 
dence course taken on a credit-no credit basis will be included in the 
18-semester-hour credit-no credit limit. 

Any lower- or upper-division course may be chosen under the 
credit-no credit option except courses used to satisfy the University's 
general education requirements, courses designated by name or area 
by the major department for satisfying the major, and those specifi- 
cally required by name by the college for graduation. In cases of 
subsequent change of major, courses previously taken under the 
credit-no credit option in the new field may qualify for meeting major 
requirements. 

For a course taken in residence, undergraduate students must 
exercise the credit-no credit option within the first eight weeks of 
instruction in a semester, during the first four weeks of an eight-week 
course taught in a fall or spring semester, during the first two weeks 
of instruction in the four-week summer term, or during the first four 
weeks of instruction in the eight-week term. Students may elect to 
return to the regular grade option by filing an amended request within 
the first eight weeks of instruction in a semester, within the first four 
weeks of instruction in an eight-week course taught during a semes- 
ter, during the first two weeks of instruction in the four-week summer 
term, or within the first four weeks of instruction in the eight-week 



summer term. The credit-no credit option form must be properly 
approved and deposited in the college office. 

Instructors are not informed of those students in their classes who 
are taking work under the credit-no credit option, and they report the 
usual letter grades at the end of the course. These grades are automati- 
cally converted to CR or NC. Grades of C- or better are required in 
order to earn credit. Credit-no credit courses are not counted toward 
the grade point average but are included as part of the total credit 
hours. Final grades of CR or NC (for credit or no credit) are recorded 
on the student's permanent academic record and subsequently will 
not be changed to letter grades. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Classification of an undergraduate student is made by the Office of 
Admissions and Records based upon the number of credit hours 
earned, which includes credit earned by examination or accepted for 
transfer by the University whether or not such credit is applicable to 
a student's degree program. Classification for registration, certifica- 
tion, and assessment purposes is based on the following scale. 



Freshman standing 
Sophomore standing 
Junior standing 
Senior standing 



0-29.9 hours 
30-59.9 hours 
60-89.9 hours 
90 or more hours 



TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Former and currently enrolled students who have paid their Univer- 
sity charges are entitled to receive, upon written request, transcripts 
of their academic records. Upon graduation or withdrawal from the 
University, any student with an outstanding loan is not issued a 
transcript until he or she has completed an exit interview with the 
Office of Student Accounts and Cashiering. Each transcript includes 
a student's entire academic record to date and current academic 
status. Partial transcripts are not issued. 

The charge for an official transcript is $5 per copy. The charge for 
a written certification of enrollment or other data is $4 per copy. The 
charge for additional copies ordered at the same time and sent to the same 
address or picked up is $2 per copy. 

A student who submits an application for direct transfer admis- 
sion to the University of Illinois at Chicago or to the University of 
Illinois at Springfield through the Urbana admissions office, 901 West 
Illinois Street, will have a transcript included with it at no charge. 

Telephone requests for transcripts cannot be honored. Transcripts 
are released only by written request to whomever a student or former 
student designates. A written request accompanied by a check or 
money order made payable to the University of Illinois should be sent 
to the Office of Admissions and Records (see the inside back cover for 
address information). 

STUDENT RECORDS POLICY 

It is University policy to comply fully with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended. Guidelines and regula- 
tions for discharge of the University's obligation under this act are 
contained in the Code of Policies and Regulations Applying to All Students, 
available to students on the World Wide Web (http:// 
www.oar.uiuc.edu/records/FERPA.html) and at 901 West Illinois 
Street. 

Under these guidelines: 

— Certain student records may be released only with the prior 
consent of the student. 

— Certain student records can be released with or without the 
student's consent. 

— Under certain conditions, parents may be granted access to a 
student's record with or without the student's consent. 

— A student has the right to inspect his or her educational record. 

— Procedures exist for students to challenge the contents of their 
educational records. 

— The University may release without the student's consent infor- 
mation that appears in student directories and publications that are 
available to the public, except when a currently enrolled student 
requests that the University suppress this information. 

— A student has the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department 
of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Illinois 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 



33 



at Urbana-Champaign to comply with the requirements of Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Write to: Family Policy Compli- 
ance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Av- 
enue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605. 

A currently enrolled student may elect to suppress either personal 
information or academic information or both categories of directory 
information. To be effective for a term, a request form must be 
submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records (901 West Illinois 
Street) by the end of the fifth class day of the term. The University will 
continue to suppress this information until the student withdraws the 
request. 

For former students, directory information includes the student's 
name; date of birth; last known addresses and telephone numbers; 
college, curriculum, and major field of study; dates of attendance and 
full- or part-time status; class level; honors; certificates or degrees 
earned at the University and the date(s) conferred; weight and height 
for athletic team members; participation in officially recognized ac- 
tivities and sports; and institutions previously attended. 

FALSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS 

Any student who, for purposes of fraud or misrepresentation, falsi- 
fies, forges, defaces, alters, or mutilates in any manner any official 
University document or representation thereof may be subject to 
discipline. Some examples of official documents are identification 
cards, receipts, transcripts of credits, library documents, and petitions 
for change in residence status. Any student who uses computing 
facilities to interfere with computing systems or who uses another 
identification to gain access to computing systems may be subject to 
discipline. 

Any applicant who knowingly withholds information or gives 
false information on an application for admission or readmission may 
become ineligible for admission to the University or may be subject to 
discipline. 

Any student who knowingly withholds information or gives false 
information in any document or materials submitted to any member 
or agent of the University may be subject to discipline. 

PLACEMENT DECISIONS 

Many programs on the campus include a service or practical training 
component involving placement in a field training program, intern- 
ship, or other outreach function. These placements are beneficial to the 
University and to the students. The decision on a particular student's 
suitability for placement, however, is a matter of discretion exercised 
by the administrator of the placing program. The University reserves 
the right to make such decisions on placement. 

Each department/program administrator has authority and dis- 
cretion to place students in field /training programs as part of aca- 
demic programs. If a student believes a request for placement has been 
inappropriately or arbitrarily denied, the student may appeal the 
decision by the administrator responsible to the dean/director for that 
academic program. Unless an alternative grievance procedure ap- 
plies, the dean's decision on placement shall be final. 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

Each new student is issued a permanent photo identification card, 
which must be retained by the student while registered at the Univer- 
sity. The ID card remains the property of the University, and any 
student who alters or intentionally mutilates a University ID, who 
uses the ID of another, or who allows his or her own ID card to be used 
by another may be subject to discipline. 

A charge of $20 (amount subject to change) is assessed for replac- 
ing each lost, mutilated, confiscated, or stolen photo ID card. Ques- 
tions regarding the issuance of ID cards may be directed to the 
Campus ID Center, 244-0135. 

STUDENTS IN DEBT TO THE UNIVERSITY 

Students will be assessed $15 (amount subject to change) for each 
check they present to the University that is returned for insufficient 
funds or other reasons. Additional penalties, including dismissal 
from the University, may be imposed on students who continually 
permit their University accounts to become delinquent or who issue 
checks that are returned to the University unpaid. 



Students who are in debt to the University at the end of any 
academic term may not be permitted to register again. They are not 
entitled to receive diplomas, official statements, or transcripts of credit 
until the indebtedness has been paid or suitable arrangements for 
payment have been made, unless there are pending bankruptcy 
petitions of the students seeking a discharge of all such indebtedness 
or all such indebtedness has been discharged. 

AUTOMOBILES, MOTORCYCLES, MOTOR SCOOTERS, 
BICYCLES, AND MASS TRANSIT 

All students, their spouses, and dependent children with valid vehicle 
operator permits to operate automobiles, motorcycles, motor scoot- 
ers, and bicycles in Illinois may operate them on the Urbana-Champaign 
campus, provided they comply with University and state regulations. 
Public parking facilities are extremely limited near the campus. A 
permit to park or store a car in University rental lots requires payment 
of an annual fee. Bus service to the University is provided by the C-U 
MTD. For route, schedule, and fare information, call MTD at 384-8188. 
Information about the operation of motor vehicles and bicycles is 
available from the Division of Campus Parking and Transportation, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Public Safety Building, 
1110 West Springfield, Room 201, Urbana, IL 61801, (217) 333-3530. 
For more information, please check the Web site at 
www.parking@uiuc.edu. 

Graduation Requirements 



GRADE-POINT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S 
DEGREE 

All candidates for a degree must have at least a 2.0 (A = 4.0) grade point 
average on all University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign credits 
counted for graduation requirements and at least a 2.0 grade point 
average on the combined transfer and University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign credits counted for graduation requirements. Certain 
colleges have established higher scholastic graduation requirements 
for specific curricula. (Grades in courses taken at the other campus of 
the University are counted as transferred.) 

When a course has been repeated, both the original and subse- 
quent grades are included in the average if the course is acceptable 
toward graduation, but the credit is counted only once. An original 
grade is not removed from the student's record for a course subse- 
quently passed by special examination. 

Students who do not meet the requirements stated above may 
graduate if they have the minimum grade point average calculated by 
either of the following alternative methods: 

— Courses in which grades of D or F have been recorded are excluded, 
not to exceed a total of 10 semester hours completed prior to the last 
30 hours of work completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign and counted for graduation requirements, or 
— A grade point average of no less than 2.1 is calculated for the last 60 
semester hours of work counted for graduation requirements and 
completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, except 
in those curricula for which a higher scholastic graduation require- 
ment is specified. 

Each college office, on request, will inform students regarding the 
scholarship regulations of that college. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

FIRST BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

In addition to meeting specific course and scholastic requirements, 
each candidate for a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign must spend either the first three years earning 
not fewer than 90 semester hours or the last year (two semesters or the 
equivalent) earning not fewer than 30 semester hours in residence at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus, uninterrupted by any work in an- 
other institution. Only those courses that are applicable toward the 
degree sought may be counted in satisfying the above minimum 
requirements. (Either three twelve-week terms or four eight-week 
sessions are the equivalent of two semesters). 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



34 



Concurrent attendance at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign and another collegiate institution does not interrupt the 
residence requirement for graduation. 

Credit earned through the Advanced Placement Program is in- 
cluded in the first 90 semester hours and is not considered as interrup t- 
ing residence. 

Credit allowed toward graduation for completion of courses of 
studv offered bv the religious foundations located in Urbana-Cham- 
paign is not counted as interrupting residence or counted toward 
satisfying minimum residence requirements for graduation. 

Attendance at another institution under the Committee on Institu- 
tional Cooperation Program or participation in the University of 
Illinois foreign study programs or the Study Away from Campus 
Programs for which students are registered in Urbana-Champaign 
courses does not interrupt residence, and credits earned through these 
programs are counted as residence credit toward graduation, pro- 
vided that within the last two years of study at least 30 semester hours 
have been earned in courses taken on the Urbana-Champaign cam- 
pus. 

Transfer students from community colleges must, after attaining 
junior standing, earn at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
or any other approved four-year institution at least 60 semester hours 
acceptable toward their degrees, in addition to meeting the usual 
residence requirement for degrees from the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. 

Students transferring from the University of Illinois at Chicago or 
from the University of Illinois at Springfield to the Urbana-Cham- 
paign campus as candidates for degrees must satisfy the residence and 
academic requirements for graduation established for the curriculum 
entered on the Urbana-Champaign campus. Since the campuses do 
not have identical academic programs, a student who is contemplat- 
ing a transfer should consult with the college into which he or she 
expects to transfer. 

A student attending as "visitor only" is not considered a "student 
in residence." 

A student who requests that the residence requirement for gradu- 
ation be waived must submit a petition to the dean of his or her college, 
who will take action on the petition. 

A student on drop status may not graduate until he or she has been 
reinstated by the dean of the student's college. A student who meets 
the conditions stated in the first paragraph of this section must notify 
the dean of his or her college of the student's intent to apply credit 
earned elsewhere toward the degree requirements and arrange to 
have a final official transcript from the other collegiate institution(s) 
attended sent to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may, with college 
approval, be permitted to receive a second bachelor's degree from the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, provided that all speci- 
fied requirements for both degrees are fully met and that the curricu- 
lum offered for the second degree includes at least the final 30 
semester hours that are earned in residence at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus and not counted for the other degree. 

The second bachelor's degree may be earned either concurrently 
with or subsequent to the first degree. 

A candidate for a second bachelor's degree must meet the same 
residence requirements as for the first degree. 

Only those courses that are acceptable toward the degree sought 
may be counted in satisfying the above minimum requirements. This 
includes the 30 additional hours required for the second degree. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Undergraduate education at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign includes general education as an essential complement to 
major fields of study. General education uses the theories, concepts, 
and methods of the disciplines to broaden students' understanding 
and appreciation of human thought and achievement and to provide 
a richer context within which to understand their own specialized 
fields. The campus general education component is intended to help 
students understand and appreciate diverse areas of scholarship, to 
develop and enhance a wide range of intellectual abilities, and to 
strengthen students' abilities to develop and communicate ideas 
effectively and responsibly. 

The campus Senate, the faculty General Education Board, and the 
colleges and departments have implemented enhanced general edu- 



cation requirements. Thus, new students should confirm their general 
education requirements by consulting college and departmental of- 
fices, handbooks, or advisers. Students in teacher education programs 
must consult the Council on Teacher Education general education 
course list when selecting their courses to meet general education 
requirements. 

All students are required to complete the following minimum 
requirements: 

Composition I: 3-6 hours 

Composition II: 3 hours 

Quantitative Reasoning I: 3 hours 

Humanities /Arts: 6 hours 

Social /Behavioral Sciences: 6 hours 

Natural Sciences /Technology: 6 hours 

Cultural Studies: Western/Comparative Culture(s): 3 hours 

Cultural Studies: Non-Western/U.S. Minority Culture(s): 3 hours 

More information about campus general education requirements 
and course lists can be found at: http://www.provost.uiuc.edu/ 
gened 

Satisfactory proficiency in the use of English is a requirement for 
all undergraduate degrees awarded at the Urbana-Champaign cam- 
pus of the University. This proficiency will be certified by the fulfill- 
ment of a two-part requirement identified as Composition I and II. The 
Composition I requirement can be met by the satisfactory completion 
of one of the following courses or course sequences: RHET 101 and 
102; RHET 103 and 104; RHET 105 or 108; or SPCOM I 11 and 112 
(Verbal Communication). A student with a sufficiently high score on 
either the ACT English Subtest or the SAT Verbal Test and high 
performance on a written essay examination may satisfy the Compo- 
sition I requirement for graduation. Students may also proficiency the 
requirement by scoring 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) Test 
in language and composition, or on the AP Test in literature. 

If the academic credentials of a transfer student do not indicate 
fulfillment of course work equivalent to the University of Illinois's 
Composition I requirement, the student may be administered the 
Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination, the ESL Placement 
Test, or the Transfer Writing Examination. 

Under certain conditions, students may satisfy the Composition I 
requirement for graduation through satisfactory completion of courses 
offered by the Division of English as an International Language. 
Satisfactory completion of courses (E S L 1 14 and E S L 1 15) satisfies the 
Composition I requirement. Evidence that a student is eligible to 
enroll in these courses is established by a satisfactory score on the ESL 
Placement Test, a test of oral and written English administered by the 
Division of English as an International Language. On the basis of this 
test, the student will be enrolled in the course or courses appropriate 
to his or her English needs. 

If a student's score on the ESL Placement Test is high enough so 
that he or she does not have to take E S L 113, the student is free to take 
either E S L 114 and E S L 115 or RHET 105. If the student chooses to 
do the latter, he or she must take the Rhetoric Placement and Profi- 
ciency Examination offered by the Department of English. 

The Composition II requirement may be met by satisfactory comple- 
tion of any course that has been approved and designated as satisfying 
the demands of the Composition II requirement. The Composition II 
requirement cannot be met by passing a proficiency examination. 

COMPOSITION I AND II REQUIREMENT 

Satisfactory proficiency in the use of English is a requirement for all 
undergraduate degrees awarded at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
of the University. This proficiency will be certified by the fulfillment 
of a two-part requirement identified as Composition I and II. The 
Composition I requirement can be met by the satisfactory completion 
of one of the following courses or course sequences: RHET 101 and 
102; RHET 103 and 104; Rhetoric 105 or 108; or SPCOM 111 and 112 
(Verbal Communication). A student with a sufficiently high score on 
either the ACT English Subtest or the SAT Verbal Test and high 
performance on a written essay examination may satisfy the Compo- 
sition I requirement for graduation. Students may also proficiency the 
requirement by scoring 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement (AP) Test 
in language and composition, or on the AP Test in literature. 

If the academic credentials of a transfer student do not indicate 
fulfillment of course work equivalent to the University of Illinois's 
Composition I requirement, the student may be administered the 
Rhetoric Placement and Proficiency Examination, the ESL Placement 
Test, or the Transfer Writing Examination. 



GRADUATION WITH HONORS 



35 



Under certain conditions, students may satisfy the Composition I 
requirement for graduation through satisfactory completion of courses 
offered by the Division of English as an International Language. 
Satisfactory completion of courses (E S L 1 14 and E S L 1 15) satisfies the 
Composition I requirement. Evidence that a student is eligible to 
enroll in these courses is established by a satisfactory score on the ESL 
Placement Test, a test of oral and written English administered by the 
Division of English as an International Language. On the basis of this 
test, the student will be enrolled in the course or courses appropriate 
to his or her English needs. 

If a student's score on the ESL Placement Test is high enough so 
that he or she does not have to take E S L 1 13, the student is free to take 
either E S L 114 and E S L 115 or RHET 105. If the student chooses to 
do the latter, he or she must take the Rhetoric Placement and Profi- 
ciency Examination offered by the Department of English. 

The Composition II requirement may be met by satisfactory comple- 
tion of any course that has been approved and designated as satisfying 
the demands of the Composition II requirement. The Composition II 
requirement cannot be met by passing a proficiency examination. 

A list of courses that fulfill the Composition II requirement is 
available from departmental and college advising staff, or on the Web 
at http://www.provost.uiuc.edu/gened. 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

The quantitative reasoning requirement became effective for new 
freshmen entering in Fall 1993. The quantitative reasoning require- 
ment applies to courses in the fields of mathematics, computer sci- 
ence, probability and statistics, and formal logic. The various colleges 
and programs of study differ on the specific courses which fulfill this 
requirement; courses which fulfill the campus quantitative reasoning 
requirement may not meet a specific college's requirements (or vice 
versa). Students should contact their college or departmental adviser 
for more information about fulfilling the quantitative reasoning re- 
quirement. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES 

Except as prohibited or limited by the established policy of the 
student's college, credit in University foreign language courses taken 
to remove high school entrance deficiencies may, at the discretion of 
the college, be counted in the total hours required for graduation or be 
accepted in partial or complete satisfaction of the foreign language 
requirement for the degree. 

Normally no more than 1 hours of proficiency credit for the study 
of a single foreign language at the elementary and intermediate level 
shall be counted for graduation in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. Additional credit may be granted for advanced courses 
emphasizing literature and language structure rather than communi- 
cative competence in the language. 

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATION COURSES 

Courses of study offered by the religious foundations located in 
Urbana-Champaign that have been approved by the College of Lib- 
eral Arts and Sciences Committee on Courses and Curricula are 
accepted for credit by the University provided that the student is 
currently registered in University courses. Registration in these courses 
is limited to students of sophomore standing or above who are 
currently registered on campus in University courses and must be 
approved in advance by the dean of the student's college. Grades in 
these courses are not included in the student's all-University scholas- 
tic average and the courses are not counted as interrupting residence 
or toward satisfying minimum residence requirements for gradua- 
tion. 

A maximum of 10 semester hours of credit in religious foundation 
courses may, with the approval of the dean of the college concerned, 
be counted toward graduation. The College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences has different restrictions which are given in detail in the LAS 
Student Handbook. 

The above credit limitations and other restrictions apply to reli- 
gious foundation courses only and not to courses offered by the 
University of Illinois Program in Religious Studies. 



CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTRAMURAL COURSES 

After matriculation, a student may count toward his or her degree, 
with the approval of the dean of the student's college, as many as 60 
semester hours of credit earned in extramural and /or correspondence 
study, provided that: 

— The student completes all of the remaining requirements for the 
degree in residence at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
or 

— The student presents acceptable residence credit for work done 
elsewhere and completes requirements needed for his or her degree in 
residence at the University. In all cases, the senior year (two semesters 
of not less than 30 semester hours) must be done in residence at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

A student who has completed the first three years in residence at 
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, earning a minimum 
of 90 semester hours, may do all or part of the senior year in correspon- 
dence or extramural study, subject to meeting all of the requirements 
for the degree. 

Credit for correspondence work taken with fully accredited insti- 
tutions may be allowed, but only on approval of the dean of the 
student's college. 

THESES 

If a thesis is to be submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements 
for a bachelor's degree, the subject must be announced by the end of 
the sixth week of instruction in the first semester of the student's 
senior year. The work must be done under the direction of a professor 
in the department concerned and must be applicable to the curriculum 
in which a degree is expected. A maximum of 10 hours of credit in 
thesis work may be counted toward a bachelor's degree. 

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT FOR SERVICE AND 
EDUCATION IN THE ARMED FORCES 

The University grants registered students college credit for certain 
training and experience in the armed forces of the United States. A 
student who completes military service in the U.S. Air Force, Army, 
Marine Corps, Navy, or Coast Guard, including basic or recruit 
training of six months or more, is awarded 4 semester hours of credit 
in basic military science upon presentation of evidence on Form DD- 
214 of honorable discharge or transfer to the reserve component. 

Correspondence courses for which the student has passed the end- 
of-course examination prepared by the U.S. Armed Forces Institute, 
that are baccalaureate-oriented, and that correspond in level and 
content to courses offered at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign are recognized for credit. 

Credit recommendations in the Guide to the Evaluation of Education 
Experiences in the Armed Forces (published by the American Council on 
Education) for military service school training will be considered for 
transfer credit as follows: (1) credit will be granted for college-level, 
baccalaureate-oriented training and education, (2) vocational credit 
related to the student's curriculum choice will be referred for consid- 
eration to the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled, and 
(3) duplicate credit will be deleted. Applicability of military credit 
toward a particular degree is determined by the dean of the college. 
Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Admis- 
sions and Records. 

Graduation with Honors 

Recognition for superior academic achievement is given by the Uni- 
versity and by the colleges and departments. 

UNIVERSITY HONORS 

Continuous academic achievement is recognized by inscribing the 
student's name on a Bronze Tablet that hangs on a wall of the Main 
Library. To qualify, an undergraduate student must: 

— Have at least a 3.5 (A = 4.0) cumulative grade point average for all 
work taken at the University through the academic term prior to 
graduation, and 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



36 



— Rank, on the basis of his or her cumulative grade point average 
(including University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and trans- 
fer u ork, if any) through the academic term prior to graduation, in 
the top 3 percent of the students in his or her college graduating 
class. 

Transfer students, in addition to meeting the general rules for 
qualification, must satisfy two additional requirements: they must 
have cumulative University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign grade 
point averages as high as the lowest ones listed for students in their 
colleges who qualify on the basis of having completed all of their work 
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and they must earn 
40 or more semester hours at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign through the academic term prior to graduation. 

For the purpose of this award, college graduating class means all 
students receiving bachelor's degrees from the same University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign college between July 1 of each year and 
June 30 of the next. 

For the purpose of this award, academic term prior to graduation 
means: for August graduates, the preceding spring semester; for 
October graduates, the preceding spring semester; for January gradu- 
ates, the preceding summer session; for May graduates, the preceding 
fall semester. The list will be determined each year after grades for the 
fall semester are available. To be considered in the calculation of 
University Honors, all grade corrections must be recorded by the end 
of the eighth week of the spring semester. 

COLLEGE HONORS 

Each college prescribes the conditions under which degree candidates 
may be recommended for graduation with honors. These distinctions 
are noted on students' diplomas, permanent University records, and 
official transcripts of credits. Detailed information concerning the 
requirements for graduation with honors is included in the sections of 
this catalog applying to the individual colleges and departments. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

The national honor society of Phi Kappa Phi recognizes and encour- 
ages superior scholarship in all academic disciplines. To be eligible, a 
junior (72 to 89 letter-graded hours) must have a minimum cumula- 
tive grade point average of 3.75 and a scholastic rank in the upper 5 
percent of the junior class; seniors (90 or more letter-graded hours) 
must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.5 and a 
scholastic rank in the upper 10 percent of the senior class. 

Invitations to membership are mailed to all eligible juniors and 
seniors, and an initiation program is held near the end of each 
semester. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

The names of undergraduates who have achieved grade point aver- 
ages for a given semester in the top 20 percent of their college class will 
be included on a list prepared for the dean of the college. (In the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts, the names of eligible undergradu- 
ates who have achieved grade point averages for a given semester in 
the top 20 percent of all students in their curriculum will be listed.) This 
list is publicized within the University and is sent to news agencies 
throughout the state. Names of James Scholars are preceded by an 
ampersand (&). 

To be eligible for Dean's List recognition, students must complete 
successfully 14 academic semester hours, of which at least 12 must be 
taken for letter grade (A, B, C, D, E, AB). Only grades in hand at the 
time the list is compiled will be considered in determining eligibility 
unless it can be established that the final grade average will be above 
the minimum required regardless of the grade eventually received; 
students with EX, DF, or missing grades will be added as soon as letter 
grades are received and eligibility can be determined. Credits earned 
during the semester through proficiency, CLEP, and advanced place- 
ment examinations may not be counted toward the 14-semester-hour 
requirement. 

Individual colleges may modify the above criteria, and interested 
students should contact their college offices for further information. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has different eligibility 
requirements, which are given in detail in the LAS Student Handbook. 



Reserve Officers' Training Corps 



NOTE: Students considering enrollment in military science, naval science, or air force 
aerospace studies courses should be aware that University policy prohibits 
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation; students may enroll in these courses 
regardless of sexual orientation. As of the date of the publication of this catalog, 
students seeking to enroll in ROTC are not asked to disclose their sexual orientation. 
However, homosexual conduct is grounds for disenrollment from the program. 

ARMY ROTC 

Military training has been given at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
since the University opened in 1868. Originally mandatory for all male 
undergraduates under the land-grant charter, the program became 
entirely voluntary in 1964. Participation in the Army Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTC) is open to all University students, regardless 
of their academic majors or levels. 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps is an elective program 
that provides career opportunities, leadership experience, adventure 
training, and financial support to participating students. The program 
is a consecutive series of elective courses and other training, including 
leadership laboratories and field trips designed to prepare young men 
and women for leadership positions as officers in the U.S. Army, 
Army Reserve, and Army National Guard. The leadership principles 
and management techniques presented, however, are equally appli- 
cable to success in any field. Financial support is provided both by 
state, federal, and named scholarships and by a subsistence allowance 
of $150 a month. 

LEADERSHIP TRAINING 

Students' leadership is continuously developed through a Leadership 
Development Program (LDP). The LDP evaluates students' leader- 
ship potential in a variety of leadership roles and provides immediate 
feedback to students. Emphasis is on hands-on leadership experience. 
Cadets plan, organize, and evaluate much of the laboratory and field 
training. 

ADVENTURE TRAINING 

Training in mountaineering techniques (rappelling), land navigation, 
survival, rifle marksmanship, and waterborne operations is given to 
every student. Some students are selected to attend the Army airborne 
school, helicopter operations school, and leadership training with 
active and reserve units. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Enrollment in Army ROTC can provide significant financial support 
to interested students, regardless of family financial need. Army 
ROTC offers three financial aid programs that provide support to 
Army ROTC cadets: the Army ROTC Federal Scholarship program, 
the Illinois State ROTC Scholarship program, and the Simultaneous 
Membership Program of the Army ROTC and the National Guard or 
Army Reserve. The federal scholarships are competitive scholarships 
available for college-bound high school juniors and seniors, and 
college freshmen and sophomores. These scholarships provide funds 
for tuition, University fees, books, and $150 a month for four, three, or 
two years, depending on the time of application. Illinois State ROTC 
Scholarships are competitive scholarships that provide full tuition 
waivers for ROTC students who are residents of the state. The Simul- 
taneous Membership Program allows students to join the Army 
Reserve or Army National Guard and also to join Army ROTC. The 
program provides the student with increased reserve forces pay, 
benefits of the new GI Bill, and $150 a month from Army ROTC. 
Engineering students who are enrolled in Army ROTC are eligible for 
other additional financial aid through named scholarships. These 
students should contact the ROTC office for further details. All Army 
ROTC cadets, as a minimum, receive $150 a month for their last two 
years in the program if they meet the requirements for continuing. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

The training and instruction are designed to prepare students to serve 
as officers in the U.S. Army. This may be full time on active duty, or 
part time with the Army Reserve or National Guard. Service with the 
reserve forces allows pursuit of a civilian career while simultaneously 
serving the country as an officer. Approximately half of Army ROTC 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 



37 



graduates pursue civilian careers and have discovered that their 
ROTC leadership training is an invaluable tool for success. 

PROGRAM OPTIONS 

1. Four years — the student attends one military science course each 
semester. 

2. Three and one-half years — the student takes two military science 
courses during the first semester, then one course each semester 
thereafter. 

3. Three years — the student takes two military science courses per 
semester during the first year, then one course each semester 
thereafter. 

4. Two years — those students with prior military experience (junior 
ROTC, prior military service) may receive credit for the first two 
years of Army ROTC and begin with the second two years. Also, 
students who are interested in the program, but who were not 
involved in ROTC during their first two years of college, may join 
during these last two years by attending a six-week camp during 
the summer, for which each student receives more than $600 in 
pay. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The first- and second-year educational program in military science 
consists of the courses MIL S 111, 113, 121, and 123. These 2-hour 
courses are designed to give students a basic understanding of the 
national defense establishment, the role of the U.S. Army officer, 
principles of military leadership, and military-related skills. 

The third and fourth years of military science, consisting of MIL S 
231, 233, 241, and 243, are designed to develop the skills and attitudes 
vital to assuming leadership positions. 

A leadership laboratory is required with each academic course. 
The leadership laboratory is one-and-one-half hours per week for the 
first two years, two hours per week in the third year, and three hours 
per week during the fourth year. Practical experience is provided in 
military and leadership skills in a framework that provides maximum 
opportunity to develop each student's self-confidence, decisiveness, 
and leadership potential. 

To develop the student's academic diversity, each student must 
demonstrate proficiency or complete a course in math reasoning, 
computer literacy, human behavioral science, oral / written communi- 
cations, and military history, prior to being commissioned. These 
courses may be used to fulfill other academic degree requirements. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 MIL S 111 — Introduction to Military Leadership 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 MIL S 113 — Map Reading and Land Navigation 



Second year 



HOURS 

2 

HOURS 

2 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

MIL S 121 — Military Mountaineering and Survival 

SECOND SEMESTER 

MIL S 123 — Military Marksmanship 



HOURS 

3 

HOURS 

3 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

MIL S 231— Military Leadership 

SECOND SEMESTER 

MIL S 233— Military Operations and Tactics 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 MIL S 241— Military Law and Professional Ethics 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 MIL S 243 — Military Management Systems 

Enrollment in the third- and fourth-year courses and laboratories 
requires instructor approval. Non-U.S. citizens may require the con- 
sent of their governments to be ROTC students. 

Enrollment in laboratories requires instructor approval and stu- 
dents must meet service entrance requirements. 



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

For additional information regarding any of these programs, contact 
the Professor of Military Science, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 1 13 Armory Building, 505 East Armory Street, Champaign, 
IL 61820; (217) 333-1550 or 1-877-UOFIROTC (877-863-4768). 

NAVAL ROTC 

The Naval ROTC program is a professional educational opportunity 
in which a student can earn a commission in the U.S. Navy or Marine 
Corps while pursuing a baccalaureate degree. This professional foun- 
dation is then developed and broadened during active service as a 
commissioned officer after graduation and commissioning. A student 
may be enrolled in either the Scholarship Program or the College 
Program (nonscholarship). There are four-year programs for entering 
freshmen and two-year programs for students who have already 
completed part of their college education. 

For scholarship students, no military obligation is incurred until 
the beginning of the sophomore year. College program students incur 
the military obligation at the commencement of the junior year. Naval 
science courses are open to all students, upon consent of the Depart- 
ment of Naval Science, even if they are not enrolled in either of these 
programs. 

FOUR-YEAR NAVY-MARINE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The Navy-Marine Scholarship Program provides the student with full 
tuition, fees, books, and a tax-free subsistence pay (currently $150 per 
month) for as long as four years. A student in good standing and 
enrolled in a degree program that requires longer than four years to 
complete may apply for fifth-year scholarship benefits with agree- 
ment to serve additional active service after commissioning, or the 
student may take a leave of absence of as long as a year to finish the 
baccalaureate degree. Upon graduation, scholarship students are 
commissioned in the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps and serve four 
years on active duty. Newly commissioned officers who qualify have 
the opportunity to continue their education toward advanced de- 
grees. 

Scholarship selection in national competition is based on the 
applicant's Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Test- 
ing (ACT) Program score, high school and college records, aptitude 
for naval service as judged by interviews, and by prescribed physical 
qualifications. 

Scholarship students have an opportunity during the summer to 
practice what they have learned in the classroom. Three summer 
training periods of approximately four to six weeks each are taken by 
students either at sea aboard a U.S. Navy vessel, at an aviation 
squadron, amphibious base, or on board a nuclear submarine. Stu- 
dents who choose to enter the U.S. Marine Corps spend their last 
summer training period at the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School 
in Quantico, Virginia. 

FOUR-YEAR NAVY-MARINE COLLEGE PROGRAM 

A Navy-Marine College Program student receives all required uni- 
forms and naval science textbooks while enrolled and a subsistence 
allowance (currently $150 per month) during the junior and senior 
years. If the degree program requires longer than four years to 
complete, the student may apply for a fifth-year benefit of subsistence 
pay with agreement of additional active service after commissioning 
or may take a leave of absence as long as a year to finish the baccalau- 
reate degree. Upon graduation, the college program student is com- 
missioned in the U.S. Naval or U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and serves 
three of the eight years of reserve obligation on active duty. 

A student may apply for admission to the college program through 
the Professor of Naval Science, who makes the final selection. This 
selection is based on academic, physical, and military aptitude crite- 
ria. College program students also attend one summer at-sea training 
session, usually after the junior year. 

College program students are eligible to be selected for the schol- 
arship program through recommendation of the Professor of Naval 
Science; the decision is made by the Chief of Naval Education and 
Training (CNET). These students are also eligible to receive Illinois 
State ROTC scholarships (if residents of this state). These scholarships 
are awarded annually on a competitive basis and cover tuition only. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



38 



TWO-YEAR COLLEGE PROGRAM 

This program provides a student with all required uniforms, naval 
science textbooks, and subsistence pay (currently $150 per month). 
Applicants should have two remaining years of study at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. During the summer before the junior year, 
students attend a six-week course of military instruction at the Naval 
Science Institute at Newport, Rhode Island. Transportation costs and 
salaries are paid to the students. After successful completion of the 
course, they join their contemporaries in the college program and also 
mav be eligible for appointment to scholarship status, depending on 
their backgrounds and academic performances. College program 
students participate in a four-to-six-week summer at-sea training 
period between their junior and senior years, as do their scholarship 
counterparts. Applications must be complete and reach CNET by 15 
March of the sophomore year. Interviewing begins in January of the 
sophomore year. 

TWO-YEAR SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

Acceptance into the Naval ROTC Two- Year Scholarship Program 
training option guarantees a student a two-year Naval ROTC scholar- 
ship. Summer training and other benefits, as well as Naval ROTC 
training during the junior and senior years, are the same as those for 
the two-year college program. Prerequisites for this option include at 
least one year of calculus, with a C average or better. A minimum 
grade point average of 2.5/4.0 is required, with a preferred major of 
mathematics, chemistry, physics, or engineering. Applications must 
be complete and reach CNET by 15 March of the sophomore year. 
Interviewing begins in January of the sophomore year. 

NURSE OPTION 

The Nurse Option Scholarship Program provides the student the 
same benefits as four-year scholarship students. Upon graduation, 
students are commissioned in the U.S. Navy Nurse Corps. Nurse 
option students have two specialized four-week summer training 
periods at a major naval hospital and at sea. Only the freshman and 
senior naval science and English composition class requirements are 
mandatory. Graduates must pass their licensing exam within one 
year. 

STATE NAVY ROTC SCHOLARSHIP 

For information regarding the state Navy ROTC scholarships, see the 
Financial Aid section of this catalog. 

REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to mental, physical, and aptitude requirements, men and 
women in the Naval ROTC program must: 

— Be citizens of the United States. 

— Be between 17 and 21 years of age by September 1 of the year in 
which enrollment begins (those contemplating a bachelor's degree 
that requires five years to complete must be younger than age 20 on 
June 30 of that year). If younger than age 18, they must have the 
consent of their parents. Scholarship students must be younger 
than age 25 on June 30 of the calendar year in which they are 
commissioned. College program students must meet identical 
requirements except that they must be younger than age 27 on June 
30 of the calendar year in which commissioned. 

— Have no moral obligations or personal convictions that will pre- 
vent them from executing the oath of office. 

Each week, Naval ROTC students have a two-hour naval science 
laboratory course, N S 100, for which there is no credit, and also take 
the following naval science and University academic courses. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 N S 101 — Introduction to Naval Science 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 N S 102 — Sea Power and Maritime Affairs 

Second year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 N S 121 — Naval Weapons Systems 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 N S 122 — Introduction to Naval Engineering 



Third year (Navy) 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 N S 231 — Naval Operations and Navigation, I 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 N S 232 — Naval Operations and Navigation, II 

Third year (Marine) 



HOURS 

3 

HOURS 

3 

3 



FIRST SEMESTER 

HIST 281— War, Military Institutions, and Society to 1815 

SECOND SEMESTER 

HIST 282— War, Military Institutions, and Society Since 1815 



N S 291— Evolution of Warfare 
Fourth year (Navy) 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 N S 242 — Naval Leadership and Management, II 

Fourth year (Marine) 



HOURS 

3 



REQUIRED COURSES 

N S 293 — History of Amphibious Warfare 



Each scholarship student's degree program must also include the 
following University courses (not required for Marine Corps option 
students): 

SEMESTERS COURSES 

2 Calculus 

2 Physics (calculus-based) 

2 English 

1 U.S. Military Affairs/National Security Policy 

1 Computer Science 

Marine option students are to complete one semester of political 
science as directed by the Marine Officer Instructor. 

College program (nonscholarship) students, who are not gov- 
erned by federal scholarship requirements, must complete two semes- 
ters of college mathematics and the physical sciences as a prerequisite 
to commissioning. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Further information regarding Naval ROTC may be obtained in 
person from or by writing to the Professor of Naval Science, Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 236 Armory, 505 East Armory 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820; (217) 333-1061 

AIR FORCE ROTC 

The Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps at the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is an elective program that provides 
professional military training for participating students. The program 
is a consecutive series of elective courses, leadership laboratories, and 
field training experiences designed to prepare young men and women 
for leadership positions as commissioned officers in the U.S. Air Force. 
The curriculum, however, is applicable to success in any field. 

For qualified applicants, Air Force ROTC offers two-, three-, and 
four-year programs leading to a commission as an Air Force officer. 
Three- and four-year program students complete the general military 
course, field training, and the professional officer course. Two-year 
program students complete an extended field training encampment 
and the professional officer course. Financial support is available 
through state tuition waivers and federal scholarships. 

Aerospace studies courses are open to all registered students, 
upon consent of the Department of Aerospace Studies, even if they are 
not enrolled in any of these programs and do not wish to pursue a 
commission. 

GENERAL MILITARY COURSE 

The educational program for the first two years in Air Force Aerospace 
Studies consists of AFAS 111, 112, 121, and 122. These 1-hour courses 
are designed to give students basic information on air power history 
and the role of the U.S. Air Force in the defense of the free world. All 
required aerospace studies textbooks and necessary uniforms are 
provided free. The general military course is open to all registered 



COUNCIL ON TEACHER EDUCATION 



39 



students at the University of Illinois without advance application and 
does not obligate students to the Air Force in any way. 

FIELD TRAINING 

Air Force ROTC field training is offered during the summer months 
at selected Air Force bases throughout the United States. Students in 
the four-year program participate in four weeks of field training, 
usually between their sophomore and junior years. Students applying 
for entry into the two-year program must successfully complete five 
weeks of field training prior to enrollment in the professional officer 
course. The Air Force pays all expenses associated with field training. 
The major areas of study in the four-week field training program 
include junior officer training, aircraft and air crew orientation, career 
orientation, survival training, base functions, Air Force environment, 
and physical training. The major areas of study included in the five- 
week field training program are essentially the same as those con- 
ducted at four- week field training plus the general military course and 
leadership laboratories. 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICER COURSE 

The third and fourth years of Air Force aerospace studies instruction, 
consisting of AFAS 231, 232, 241, and 242, are designed to develop 
skills and attitudes vital to the professional officer. Students complet- 
ing the professional officer course are commissioned as officers in the 
U.S. Air Force upon college graduation. All students in the course 
receive a nontaxable subsistence allowance of $150 per month during 
the two-semester academic year. Students wanting to enter the pro- 
gram should apply early in the spring semester of their sophomore 
year in order to begin this course the following fall semester. Final 
selection of students rests with the Professor of Aerospace Studies. 
Each member of the course must: 

— Be a citizen of the United States. 

— Be a full-time student at the University. 

— Have at least two years remaining at the University as an under- 
graduate and/or graduate student upon entry to the program. 

— Pass an Air Force physical examination. 

— Be able to complete all requirements for commissioning before 
reaching age 26 for a flying candidate or age 30 for a nonflying 
candidate. 

— Complete summer field training (four-week or six-week). 

— Achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

— Complete RHET 105 or its equivalent and a college-level math- 
ematics course before graduation. 

— Execute a written agreement with the U.S. government to complete 
the course, accept a reserve commission in the U.S. Air Force upon 
graduation, and serve four years on active duty after graduation. 
Pilot candidates agree to serve ten years and navigators six years on 
active duty, after completion of training. 

— Enlist in the Air Force Obligated Reserve Section; this enlistment is 
terminated upon acceptance of a commission. 

— Possess and maintain a quality grade point average meeting the 
requirements of the student's college. 

— Not be a conscientious objector, nor possess other disqualifying 
characteristics to a commission as established by law or the De 
partment of Defense. Talk with the AFROTC recruiter to see if you 
qualify. 

LEADERSHIP LABORATORY 

The Air Force requires all qualified officer candidates pursuing a 
commission to participate in a leadership laboratory. The leadership 
laboratory is not a University course and no University credit is 
awarded for participation. 

Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized 
cadet corps with a progression of experiences designed to develop 
each student's leadership potential. The leadership laboratory in- 
volves the study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and 
ceremonies, career opportunities, and the life and work of an Air Force 
junior officer. Students develop leadership in a practical, supervised 
laboratory, which typically includes field trips to Air Force installa- 
tions throughout the United States. This laboratory is restricted to 
individuals enrolled in the precommissioning programs only. 

AIR FORCE ROTC COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

This program provides scholarships to selected students through 
participation in the Air Force ROTC. During their participation in the 
scholarship program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 



students receive $150 per month along with paid tuition, fees, labora- 
tory expenses, and required textbooks. 

In order to be eligible for this scholarship, a student must: 

— Be a citizen of the United States. 

— Be at least 17 years old on the date of enrollment and younger than 
age 27 on June 30 of the estimated year of commissioning. 

— Pass a physical examination administered by a physician of the 
U.S. Air Force. 

— Be selected by a board of Air Force officers. 

— Have no moral objections or personal convictions that will prevent 
bearing arms and supporting and defending the Constitution of 
the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic. An 
applicant must not be a conscientious objector. 

— Achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

— Successfully complete four-week or six-week AFROTC Summer 
Field Training. 

— Maintain a quality grade point average. 

— Enlist in the Air Force Obligated Reserve System. This enlistment 
is terminated by acceptance of a commission as a second lieutenant 
in the U.S. Air Force. 

— Execute a written contract with the U.S. Government agreeing to 
complete the Air Force ROTC program, to attend summer field 
training at the specified time, to accept a reserve commission in the 
Air Force upon graduation, and to serve four years on active duty 
after graduation. 

High school students should apply for this scholarship late in their 
junior year or early in their senior year. High school students may get 
applications from their guidance counselors or from Air Force RQTC, 
Detachment 190, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 223 
Armory Building, 505 East Armory Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820, 
(217) 333-1927. Completed applications must be received no later than 
December 1 of the year before the student intends to enter college. 

For students already enrolled in the University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana-Champaign, 3V2-, 3-, 2Vi-, and 2-year scholarships are available. 
Applications can be submitted through the Air Force ROTC adminis- 
tration office, 223 Armory Building. 

STATE TUITION WAIVERS 

For information regarding Illinois Air Force ROTC Scholarships, see 
Waiver of Tuition section. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Further inquiry concerning the Air Force ROTC program at the 
University should be directed to Air Force ROTC, Detachment 190, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 223 Armory Building, 
505 East Armory Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-1927. 



Council on Teacher Education 



1310 South Sixth Street 

Champaign, IL 61820 

Executive Director: 333-2804 

Associate Director/Certification Officer: 333-7195 

Certification Services: 333-7195 

Clinical Experience Services: 333-2804 

Educational Placement Office: 333-0740 

The Council on Teacher Education formulates, modifies, implements, 
and monitors compliance with policies related to the education of 
educators. The Council also facilitates communication and promotes 
collaboration among all participants involved in the preparation and 
continuing professional development of educators. It is responsible 
for the coordination of teacher education curricula at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus and serves as the liaison between the campus and 
state certification authorities. 

Six colleges of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
offer degree programs in teacher education: the Colleges of Agricul- 
tural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences; Applied Life Studies; 
Education; Fine and Applied Arts; Liberal Arts and Sciences; and the 
Graduate College. The program for the certification of school social 
workers is offered by the School of Social Work. The list of teacher 
education curricula can be found at the end of this section. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



40 



Students mav consult their teacher education advisers or the 
certification officer for additional information about academic regula- 
tions and other policies affecting teacher education. Consult the 
I Kecutive Director of the Council for information about the Griroance 
Policy and Procedure* for Student* Enrolled in Certification Programs 
under the Purview of the Council on Teacher Education. 

Requirements 

ADMISSIONS 

Applicants to teacher education curricula must meet the admission 
requirements of the colleges and departments offering the chosen 
curricula. A student whose cumulative grade point average is less 
than the stated minimum may apply for admission and will be 
considered individually on a petition basis if enrollment vacancies 
exist in the college and curriculum to which the student seeks admis- 
sion. If admitted, the student may be placed on provisional status by 
the Council on Teacher Education for failure to maintain the requisite 
GPA. To be in compliance with recent state legislation, all students 
entering teacher education programs must also demonstrate basic 
proficiency in reading, mathematics, and language arts. 

Applicants are advised that certain felony convictions, enumer- 
ated in Articles 10-21. 9 and 21-23a of the School Code of Illinois, prohibit 
certification or employment in public schools. Questions pertaining to 
this matter should be addressed to the certification officer. 

CONTINUATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

To be eligible for continuation in teacher education, candidates must 
have UIUC and cumulative grade point averages of 2.5 (A = 4.0) or 
higher. In addition, candidates must meet grade-point requirements 
specific to their programs. The Council on Teacher Education reviews 
each student's academic progress every semester. Students who do 
not meet the grade point average criteria will receive warning letters 
from the Council advising them that their entry into student teaching 
and their receiving recommendations for certification from the Uni- 
versity are at risk. Students will be directed to their college deans for 
more information. 

In addition, faculty committees screen students' files before and 
after student teaching to assess the overall record of their performance 
in the program. Teaching effectiveness is influenced not only by 
academic proficiency, but also by the personal characteristics of the 
teacher. Therefore, faculty members take these characteristics into 
account as they evaluate students' progress in the program. Teaching 
effectiveness can also be influenced by the teacher's health. For this 
reason, UIUC provides counseling and medical services for all stu- 
dents. A student wishing additional information about these services 
may call or visit the council office. 

Because it is essential that counseling and medical services be 
offered as soon as the need becomes apparent, teacher education 
advisers and faculty members are asked to recommend for assistance 
or examination any student about whom they feel concern. A student 
who is recommended for assistance or examination will receive a 
written request to make an appointment to discuss the situation. It is 
a requirement of the Council on Teacher Education that a student who 
receives such a request must respond. Failure to do so will jeopardize 
the student's continuation in teacher education. During the appoint- 
ment, the student will be informed of the counseling and medical 
services available at the University. The student's use of these services 
is usually optional. In exceptional cases, however, the Council may 
require a student to satisfactorily complete a mental health or physical 
examination with one of the campus services. Students who wish to 
continue in teacher education must comply with such referrals. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Undergraduate students should apply for student teaching place- 
ment assignments upon completing 55 semester hours of credit. 
Graduate students should consult with their adviser about the timing 
of requests for placement. Student teaching application forms are 
available in the college student teaching office that houses each 
program. (Students may obtain referrals to the appropriate office by 
contacting the council's district liaison.) A student seeking placement 
in student teaching should contact the appropriate college office of 
student teaching no later than the October 1 of the academic year 
preceding the desired placement to determine departmental dead- 
lines and meeting dates. Although departments may set earlier dead- 
lines, the latest date for application will be the last day of classes for the 



fall semester. Students who apply after their departments' deadlines 
cannot be guaranteed a student teaching assignment during the next 
academic year. A student who will not be on campus during the fall 
semester, but who expects to enroll in educational practice (student 
teaching) during the next school year, should secure an application 
form from his or her college's office of student teaching before leaving 
campus. 

On completion of 75 or more semester hours, a student who has 
submitted an application will receive a student teaching assignment 
pending verification that he or she (1) has completed all professional 
education course work and 100 hours of early field experience, (2) has 
UIUC and cumulative grade point averages of 2.5 (A = 4.0) or higher, 
(3) has the minimum grade point average required for his or her 
program, (4) has received a recommendation for placement in student 
teaching from the appropriate faculty committee, and (5) has satisfac- 
torily completed a criminal background check. 

Only those students officially registered in teacher education 
curricula are eligible for student teaching placements. Students who 
are on academic or disciplinary probation will not be permitted to 
student teach. Graduate students pursuing teacher certification through 
completion of undergraduate program requirements are required to 
petition the Council for permission to student teach. The Council 
reserves the right to deny student teaching placement to students 
whose performance in course work or in early field experiences has 
been judged to be unsatisfactory by professional standards, including 
scholarship, ethics, and responsibility, as determined by the faculty 
and staff in consultation with cooperating school personnel. Satisfac- 
tory performance is not based solely on grades. Students may also be 
denied a student teaching placement for health reasons or for failure 
to satisfactorily complete a criminal background check. 

Students in teacher education should anticipate and plan for 
student teaching assignments. For most students, additional expense 
will be incurred during the semester in which student teaching is 
scheduled. Students cannotbe guaranteed assignments in local schools. 
While attempts will be made to honor such requests, this is not always 
possible because the number of available sites is limited. 

Students are expected to complete all field experiences, including 
student teaching, at UIUC. Under extenuating circumstances, a stu- 
dent who wishes to complete student teaching through another 
university, yet receive a UIUC degree and recommendation for certi- 
fication, must secure the prior approval of his or her adviser, college, 
and the Council on Teacher Education via petition. The petition must 
be supported by verification from the other university that it will 
accept the student as a student teacher and will comply with all 
Council on Teacher Education requirements. Approvals of such ar- 
rangements are infrequent, and students should expect to incur 
additional costs. Consult the Executive Director or Associate Director 
of the Council for additional information. 

Candidates for certification as administrators or school social 
workers should consult with their advisers regarding procedures for 
clinical placement. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

A student who completes all of the course work and other require- 
ments in a program approved for purposes of certification by the 
Illinois State Board of Education is entitled to receive the recommen- 
dation of the University for the appropriate certificate, provided the 
candidate (1) is a U.S. citizen or legally present and authorized to 
work, is of good character and in good health, and is at least 19 years 
of age; (2) is recommended for certification by his or her program 
coordinator or department chairperson on the basis of criteria ap- 
proved by the Council; (3) has UIUC and cumulative grade point 
averages of 2.5 (A =4.0) or higher; and (4) has the minimum grade 
point average required in his or her program. 

In some instances a student may be denied a recommendation for 
certification but be granted a degree by his or her college. A student 
who believes that the recommendation for certification has been 
withheld unjustly may seek redress through the grievance policy 
established by the Council on Teacher Education. A copy of the policy 
and the allied procedures may be obtained from the Executive Direc- 
tor of the Council. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

The Council on Teacher Education has adopted a common general 
education core for all undergraduate students pursuing certification 
in secondary (grades six through twelve) and special (grades kinder- 



COUNCIL ON TEACHER EDUCATION 



41 



garten through twelve) programs. Students are required to complete 
the course work specified in the council plan. Courses within the 
teaching major or minor may be used to satisfy general education 
requirements, provided they appear on the council list of approved 
courses, which is available from advisers, college offices, the council 
office, and on the World Wide Web at http: / / www.ed.uiuc.edu/cte/ 
courses/coursemain.html. Students should consult with their advis- 
ers to determine the appropriate course work to satisfy the require- 
ments. 

Students completing UIUC undergraduate programs leading to 
secondary and special certification will be expected to complete the 
following requirements. 

DISTRIBUTION 

Communication: Composition I, a speech performance course, and an advanced 
composition course (Composition II). The Composition I requirement can be 
satisfied by completing one of the following: RHET 101-102, RHET 103-104, 
RHET 105, RHET 108, SPCOM 111-112, E S L 114-115, or by proficiency credit 
in one of these options. The speech performance requirement can be satisfied 
by using SPCOM 111-112 for Composition I or by completing one of the 
courses listed for speech performance. The Composition II requirement can 
be satisfied by completing one of the courses listed by the campus for 
Composition II. 

Literature: One course 

American history: One course 

American government: One course 

Non-Western culture: One course 

One additional course chosen from literature and the arts, historical and 
philosophical perspectives, or social perspectives 

Biological science: One course* 

Physical science: One course* 

One additional course in biological or physical science* 

Mathematics: One course 

Psychology: One course 

Health and physical development: 2 hours 



*One of the science courses must have a laboratory. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION TESTS 

All applicants for certification as teachers, school administrators, and 
school service personnel must pass tests mandated by the Illinois State 
Board of Education as a condition for certification. An applicant must 
pass a test in basic skills (reading, writing, grammar, and mathemat- 
ics) and a separate test in his or her major area. For further information, 
contact the certification officer or certification specialist. 

TIME LIMIT ON CERTIFICATION 

Because certification requirements are subject to change as a result of 
new mandates from the Illinois State Teacher Certification Board and 
the Illinois General Assembly, the University is unable to guarantee a 
recommendation for certification to anyone who applies for certifica- 
tion later than one year after graduation from an approved program. 
A student completing an approved program is urged to apply for 
certification during his or her last term on campus. Applications for 
certification are available in the council office. 

BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION OF APPLICANTS FOR FIELD 
PLACEMENT AND EMPLOYMENT 

Illinois school districts are required by state law to conduct criminal 
background investigations for applicants for certified and noncertif ied 
positions with a school district. Several school districts are requiring 
that applicants for field placements be subjected to a criminal back- 
ground review prior to placement in the school districts. 

All candidates for public school certification in programs under 
the purview of the Council on Teacher Education are required to 
submit to a criminal background check by the Illinois State Police prior 
to their initial field experience in the schools. 

Candidates whose check results in a status of "no record" may be 
placed in the schools. 

Candidates whose check results in a status of "pending" may be 
placed in the schools, unless their fingerprints are required for further 
check by the Illinois State Police. 

A candidate whose name check or fingerprint check results in 
confirmation of a criminal record will not be permitted in the schools 



unless his/her case is acted on favorably by the campus Case Review 
Committee appointed by the Director of Admissions and Records. For 
purposes of any such review, a member of the Council on Teacher 
Education or a designee will join the review. The recommendation of 
the Case Review Committee will be communicated to the Director of 
Admissions who will inform the Executive Director of the Council on 
Teacher Education of the recommendation. 

Final decisions regarding the placement of students in schools 
reside with the relevant department /college, with the exception of 
those students whose criminal histories prohibit them from attaining 
certification. The relevant department/college is responsible for se- 
curing placements for all students. The relevant program coordinator 
will consult with the school district before placing the candidate in 
that district. Candidates will be informed that if their background 
check includes evidence of a criminal history, the nature of that history 
might prohibit them from being placed in a given school district and 
that the district has the right to refuse any placement. Students with 
criminal histories that prohibit them from attaining public school 
certification may not be placed in any schools. In the event that no 
district will accept a student because of his/her criminal history, the 
relevant department/college is responsible for assisting the student in 
choosing an alternative course of study. 

The criminal background check will normally be conducted at the 
time that the candidate enters the program and will be valid as long as 
the candidate remains a continuous student. If, however, a candidate 
interrupts his/her program for one semester or longer, another crimi- 
nal background check will normally be required upon his/her reen- 
try. 

This policy applies to all candidates who require field placements 
in Fall 1998 or later. Candidates are responsible for all fees connected 
with this procedure. 

Each applicant for employment in a school district in Illinois is 
required to authorize the employing school district to initiate a crimi- 
nal background check which may include a request for fingerprints. A 
school district may employ a person only after a background check has 
been initiated and may not knowingly employ a person who has been 
convicted of a felony or of attempting to commit certain offenses 
enumerated in The School Code of Illinois. This criminal background 
check is in addition to that required for field placements at UIUC. 

Special Services 

EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT 

The Council on Teacher Education's Educational Placement Office 
assists in the placement and career planning of students and alumni 
who are registered with the EPO and who are actively seeking 
education-related employment in schools, colleges and universities, 
state and federal agencies, and other settings. Services offered include 
the following: (1) the electronic storage and distribution of educa- 
tional placement files for individuals who have completed at least one 
course in any department or college at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign; (2) the publication of an online Job Vacancy 
Bulletin, available 24 hours daily, which lists notices of more than 
20,000 job vacancies that are sent to the office annually; (3) a director 
and placement counselor, who are available by appointment to pro- 
vide career information and guidance to individuals, groups, and 
classes; (4) seminars on topics related to the job search in education; (5) 
a career information center offering information about careers in 
education; and (6) on-campus interviews and a job fair with school 
and college recruiters from Illinois and other states. Students, faculty 
members, administrators, alumni, and others who are seeking educa- 
tion-related employment information are welcome to contact the 
Educational Placement Office at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 140 Education Building, 1310 South Sixth Street, Cham- 
paign, IL 61820; phone: (217) 333-0740; Fax: (217) 333-5689; e-mail: 
epo@uiuc.edu; Web page: www.ed.uiuc.edu/cte/epo. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



42 



Curricula 



A student seeking certification must complete the requirements of 
both his or her chosen curriculum and the Council on Teacher Educa- 
tion. Teacher education curricula and the colleges and departments 
that offer them are listed below. All teacher education curricula have 
been approved bv the Illinois State Board of Education. 

Students are advised that certification requirements may be al- 
tered at anv time by the State Teacher Certification Board or the 
legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled to satisfy the 
new requirements to qualify for the University's recommendation for 
certification. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 
Agricultural education* 

COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 
Physical education: curriculum and instruction* 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Early childhood education 

Education of persons with moderate and severe disabilities 

Elementary education* 

Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School Teaching** 

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 
Art education 
Music education 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer science*** 

Earth science 

English 

French* 

German* 

Latin* 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Russian* 

Social studies 

Spanish* 

Speech 

GRADUATE COLLEGE 

Graduate-level certification programs are offered in the areas 
listed below. For additional information, contact the 
certification officer or departmental office indicated. 

ADMINISTRATION: 
General Administrative: 

Department of Educational Organization and Leadership 

Department of Human Resource Education 

Department of Special Education 

School of Music 
Superintendent: 

Department of Educational Organization and Leadership 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION* 

(Option for Provisional Vocational Certification) 

Department of Human and Community Development 

COLLABORATIVE/RESOURCE TEACHER: LD, S/ED, EMH 
Department of Special Education 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

EDUCATION OF PERSONS WITH MODERATE AND 
SEVERE DISABILITIES: TMH/PH 
Department of Special Education 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION* 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

GERMAN* 

Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures 

MUSIC 
School of Music 



SPANISH* 

Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 

SPEECH AND LANGUAGE IMPAIRED 
Department of Speech and Hearing Science 



'Individuals completing these programs who wish to be able to teach departmentalized 

subjects in grades five through eight must complete additional course work. Contact 

the certification officer for additional information. 

"This minor is a required component of the teaching option within the following 

Science and Letters majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: biology, 

chemistry, English, geology, history, mathematics, physics, and speech. It is available 

only to students registered in these programs. 

"'Individuals interested in computer science education should contact the College of 

Liberal Arts and Sciences for information regarding this program. 

If the chosen curriculum requires a minor, it must be selected from 
the list of approved teacher education minors below. Students should 
be aware that the state recognizes teaching fields that are not listed 
below and does not recognize, as teaching fields, some that are. 
Students may obtain teaching endorsements for any fields for which 
they satisfy the state minimum requirements. Contact the certification 
officer for additional information regarding the endorsement fields 
available and the qualifications for each. 

Students who enroll in advanced foreign language, chemistry, or 
mathematics courses as a result of performance on a placement 
examination are often eligible to receive prerequisite credit for teacher 
certification purposes only. A student who is qualified to receive 
prerequisite credit and who has declared one of these areas as his or 
her major or minor should consult his or her teacher education 
adviser. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINORS 

Adult and continuing education* 

Art education 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Cinema studies* 

Computer science 

Earth science 

Economics 

English 

English as a second language 

French 

General science 

German 

History 

Instructional applications of computers* 

Italian 

Journalism 

Latin 

Mathematics 

Physical education 

Physical science 

Physics 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Rhetoric 

Russian 

Social studies 

Spanish 

Speech 

Urban studies* 

Women's studies* 



These minors do not lead to endorsements for additional teaching fields. 



SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER 
School of Social Work 



19 9 9-200 



UNDERGRADUATE 



PROGRAMS 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



44 



College of Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 



104 Mumford Hall 
1301 W Gregory Drive 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-3380 

The mission of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environ- 
mental Sciences (ACES) is to enhance the quality of life for rural and 
urban people through teaching, research, and outreach programs 
focused on human activity, food, fiber, and natural resource systems. 
The ACES College enrolls more than 2,000 students in the seven 
departments representing 13 majors leading to a bachelor of science 
diploma. Individual majors can select from many options that direct 
the focus of study to specific interests of students. Since its establish- 
ment, the ACES College has awarded over 25,000 baccalaureate 
degrees. It enjoys a rich history of scholarship, research, and outreach 
related to human interactions, natural resources, and environmental 
systems. 

Teaching, research, and outreach opportunities are supported by 
excellent resources. These include campus computer systems and the 
College of ACES Microcomputer Facility. Construction of a new 
College of ACES library is underway that will house the college 
Microcomputer Facility and the college collection of educational 
resources. This facility will also house the College of ACES career 
development and placement office which assists students in personal 
and career development through internships and work experiences, 
and placement after graduation. The Child Development Laboratory, 
the Edward R. Madigan Laboratory, and extensive research centers in 
Champaign-Urbana and across the state are other examples of unique 
and excellent college resources. This land-grant institution is physi- 
cally located on some of the richest soils and most favorable growing 
conditions in the world. A national historic landmark, the Morrow 
Plots are the oldest agronomic research plots in the U.S.; established 
in 1876, they are located next to the undergraduate library. 

Programs such as the JBT Undergraduate Research Program offer 
excellent opportunities for students to be involved in cutting edge 
research and solving contemporary challenges. Research is conducted 
in the broad areas of consumer behavior, crop production, vegetable 
production, ornamental horticulture, forest production and protec- 
tion, food science, human nutrition, natural resource systems, envi- 
ronmental quality, marketing and utilization of agricultural products, 
individual and family well-being, and agroecology. 

Increasing the international knowledge and experience of stu- 
dents and faculty helps meet the growing demand for graduates who 
are internationally literate and able to work effectively in different 
countries, in different countries, in different languages and with 
people of different cultures. The academic programs office provides 
focus to College international programs that are related to study 
abroad; these programs add an international dimension to the educa- 
tional experience. 

The distinguished faculty, innovative programs, and pioneering 
achievements in teaching, research, and outreach activities, together 
with an enthusiastic and competitive student body, placed the College 
of ACES among the top ten in the country in a survey of agricultural 
college deans. 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics offers core 
programs and specialized courses of study to prepare students in the 
following areas: agri-accounting, agri-finance, farm management, 
food and agribusiness management, consumer and textile marketing, 
markets and price analysis, consumer economics and finance, envi- 
ronmental and natural resource management, individually planned 
curricula, policy, and international trade and development. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers courses in 
agricultural engineering and technical systems management. The 
agricultural engineering courses cover the principles of engineering 
science and design used to solve a broad spectrum of engineering 
problems related to agriculture. Areas of specialization include food 
and process engineering, off- road equipment design, bioenvironmen- 
ta 1 engineering of plant and animal facilities, and the protection of soil 



and water resources and of soil and water quality. The technical 
systems management courses cover agricultural technology and agri- 
business management and focus on such technical specialties as 
machinery, electronics, computers, automatic controls, materials han- 
dling, buildings, waste management, grain and food processing, 
ventilation and heating, and soil conservation. 

The Department of Animal Sciences offers courses in the areas of 
animal evaluation, behavior, genetics, nutrition, physiology and meat 
science, and other courses related to the application of scientific 
principles to animal agriculture. Courses involve studies with beef 
and dairy cattle, horses, poultry, sheep, swine, and companion ani- 
mals. 

The Department of Crop Sciences offers courses in plant breeding 
and genetics, biotechnology and genetic engineering, crop evaluation, 
crop protection, plant pathology, design of field experiments, weeds 
and their control, and production and pathology of cereals, corn, 
soybeans, and forage crops. 

The Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition offers 
courses in foods and nutrition, dietetics, and hospitality management, 
as well as courses applying biology, engineering, chemistry, physics, 
and microbiology to the processing, formulation, packaging, and 
distribution of food. 

The Department of Human and Community Development in- 
cludes courses in agricultural communication, agricultural education, 
child and adolescent development, family studies, extension educa- 
tion, youth programs, and rural sociology. 

The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sci- 
ences provides courses for those interested in the forest management 
and floriculture, landscape horticulture, production of fruits and 
vegetables, turf management, and wildlife habitat and recreation. The 
department also offers courses focusing on the study and understand- 
ing of natural resources and environmental sciences including soil 
and water conservation, soil physics and chemistry, soil fertility and 
management, and soil microbiology. 

Requirements 

ADMISSION 

Besides meeting the general admission requirements of the Univer- 
sity, students entering the College of Agricultural, Consumer and 
Environmental Sciences as freshmen must have taken, prior to entry, 
eight semesters of English, four semesters of algebra, two semesters of 
plane geometry, four semesters of laboratory science, four semesters 
of social studies, and four semesters of the same foreign language. 

Applicants for freshman admission are evaluated on the basis of 
their ACT scores and high school percentile ranks. A portion of the 
applicants are required to submit a Statement of Professional Interest 
as well. Detailed information may be obtained in the Admissions 
Information brochure contained in the admission application packet. 

Applicants who have earned 60 semester hours of transferable 
baccalaureate credit at other institutions may be considered for trans- 
fer admission. Such applicants are evaluated on the basis of their 
transfer grade point averages. Some variation may occur in the grade 
point average required for transfer admission into the various cur- 
ricula. Applicants are encouraged to consult the Office of Admissions 
and Records for specific course and grade point average require- 
ments. 

GRADUATION 

The number of hours required for graduation varies between 126 and 
130 for all curricula within the college. Included in the total must be all 
courses prescribed in the given curriculum and a sufficient number of 
electives to obtain the total number. The student should consult the 
College of ACES Student Handbook for a listing of credit restrictions that 
apply in evaluating elective credits toward graduation. 

A transfer student from a four-year college must also complete the 
senior year, not less than 30 semester hours, in residence at the 
University. A transfer student from a community college must com- 
plete at least 60 semester hours at a senior college and at least the last 
30 semester hours at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Each candidate for graduation must have a grade point average of 
not less than 2.0 (A = 4.0), including grades in courses transferred from 
other institutions, and a grade point average of not less than 2.0 in all 
courses taken at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



45 



STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

In addition to maintaining prescribed academic performance levels, a 
student in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental 
Sciences is also expected to make progress in courses required in his 
or her academic major. Each student is required to have at least one 
College of ACES course in their schedule each semester, except when 
the specific curriculum does not make that desirable. Students not 
complying will be denied continuing enrollment. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

The categories currently included in campus General Education re- 
quirements are noted below. An updated list of approved courses in 
the general education category can be found on the World Wide Web 
at http://www.uiuc.edu/providers/provost/gened.htrnl. 

A. English Composition 

(1) Composition I. This requirement may be fulfilled by the 
satisfactory completion of one of the following selections or 
an equivalent: RHET 105, or RHET 108, or RHET 100 and 
101 in addition to RHET 100 and 102 or RHET 103 and 104, 
orSPCOMlllandll2,orESL114andll5.TheSPCOMlll 
and 112 sequence also fulfills the speech requirement of all 
College of ACES curricula. 

(2) Composition II. This requirement is met by completing 
an approved writing-intensive course. Some College of 
ACES curricula require specific courses from the list. These 
courses may also fulfill other curricular requirements. 

B. Quantitative Reasoning 

(1) Quantitative Reasoning I is fulfilled by a mathematics 
course in the College of ACES. Students should consult the 
specific curriculum to identify the appropriate course. 

C. Cultural Studies 

(1) The Campus requires that a minimum of two courses 
must be completed in the Cultural Studies area. One course 
must be approved and designated as concentrating on 
Western culture and one of either non- Western culture or 
American subcultures and minority groups. 

D. Natural Sciences 

(1) Six hours minimum. See individual curriculum. 

E. Humanities and Arts 

(1) Six hours minimum. See individual curriculum for 
specific requirements. 

F. Social and Behavioral Sciences 

(1) Six hours minimum. See individual curriculum for 
specific requirements. 

Special Programs 



SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION 

The College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences 
recognizes entering students who have outstanding scholastic records 
with scholarship assistance not based on financial need. Entering 
freshmen are eligible to compete for $4,000 Jonathan Baldwin Turner 
Scholarships. A student who ranks in the upper 10 percent of his or her 
high school class at the end of the junior year or who has an ACT 
composite score of 27 or better is encouraged to submit a scholarship 
application. Interviews are conducted between the junior and senior 
year in high school. Transfer students with the most outstanding 
academic records at the institutions of previous attendance are recog- 
nized each year with $500 transfer student scholarships. Additional 
information and scholarship application forms may be obtained from 
the Associate Dean for Academic Programs, 101 Mumford Hall, 1301 
West Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Additional scholarships to recognize academic merit are awarded 
within the college to continuing students based on their record earned 
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. See the financial 
aid section for a description of financial assistance available based on 
demonstrated financial need. 



Department of Agricultural and 
Consumer Economics 

332 Mumford Hall 
1301 West Gregory 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-1810 

Students pursuing degrees in the Department of Agricultural and 
Consumer Economics may choose one of three majors, each of which 
includes several program options. The majors and the associated 
options are: 

— Agribusiness, farm and financial management with options in 
agri-accounting, agri-finance, farm management, and in food and 
agribusiness management; 

— Commodity, food and textile marketing with options in consumer 
and textile marketing and in markets and price analysis; and 
— International, resource and consumer economics with options in 
consumer economics and finance; environmental and natural re- 
source management; individually planned curriculum; and in policy, 
international trade and development. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 



HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 One of: 

B&T W 250 — Principles of Business Writing 
RHET 133 — Principles of Composition 
RHET 143 — Intermediate Expository Writing 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING I 

3 MATH 124— Finite Mathematics 

4-5 MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists I or MATH 120— 

Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 
4-6 ACE 261 — Statistics for Agricultural and Consumer 

Economics or ECON 172— Economic Statistics I and ECON 

173 — Economics Statistics II 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

9 Selected from campus approved list. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

3 Selected from campus approved list. 

3 Select one from: 

ACE/NRES 183— Introduction to Fibers and Textiles 

BIOL 101 — Biological Sciences 

CHEM 101 and 105— General Chemistry and General 

Chemistry Laboratory 
GEOL 101— Introduction to Physical Geology or GEOL 

107— General Geology I 
MCBIO 100 and 101 — Introductory microbiology and 

Introductory Experimental Microbiology 
PHYCS 101— General Physics 
PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 
PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

3 ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

3 ECON 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory or ECON 
301 — Intermediate Macroeconomic theory 

12 Selected from approved list. 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 

and Environmental Sciences 

HOURS DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

35 Minimum hours in the College of ACES of which 20, 

excluding 161 and 261, must be in ACE 

2 Minimum of 300-level courses in ACE 

4 ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture and Food 

3 ACCY 201— Accounting & Accountancy I 
3 One of: 

ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



46 



126 



C S 103 — Introduction to Computers and Their Application 

to Social and Behavioral Science 
C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Business and Commerce 

One policy/international course from: 
ACE 251 — The World Food Economy 
ACE 255— Economics of Rural Poverty and Development 
ACE 287 — Textiles in the Global Economy 
ACE 351 — Economics of International Development 
ACE 353 — Economic Development in South and Southeast 

Asia 
ACE 354 — Economic Development of Tropical Africa 
ACE 355 — International Trade in Food and Agriculture 
ACE 356 — Agricultural and Food Policies and Programs 
ACE 371 — Consumer Economic Policy 
ACE 386 — Public Policy and the Textile Industry 

Total hours required for graduation 



MAJOR IN AGRIBUSINESS, FARM AND FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, Farm 
and Financial Management 

Agri-Accounting Option 

Students in this option complete a comprehensive program that 
enables them to apply accounting and business management prin- 
ciples to the production, processing, or retailing firms in the agribusi- 
ness sector. Opportunities are found as consultants, managerial ac- 
countants, or financial analysts in firms in the agribusiness sector. 
Students who choose additional accounting courses as electives are 
prepared for the Certified Management Accountant (CMA) examina- 
tion or the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE AGRI-ACCOUNTING OPTION IN 
ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACCY 202 — Accounting & Accountancy II 

4 ACCY 301 — Accounting Measurement & Disclosure 
3 ACCY 302 — Decision Making for Accountancy 

3 ACCY 303— Institutions and Regulations 

3 ACE 243— Agricultural Finance 

Agri-Finance Option 

Students in this option study finance as used in agribusiness, farming, 
financial institutions, and more broadly, in the financial services 
industry. Banks and other lending institutions such as the Farm Credit 
System seek graduates to serve as loan officers, trust account manag- 
ers, and for other banking operations. Opportunities are also found in 
positions in securities, financial planning, insurance, and real estate 
firms, as well as in the financial management of agribusiness firms. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE AGRI-FINANCE OPTION IN ADDITION 

TO DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACE 243— Agricultural Finance 

3 ACE 199F — Agribusiness Financial Mgt. 

3 ACCY 202 — Accounting and Accountancy II 

3 FIN 254 — Corporate Finance 

3 FIN 300— Financial Markets 

3 One of: 

ACE 343 — Intermediate Financial Management and 
Markets 

FIN 301 — Financial Intermediaries 

FIN 361— Investments 

Farm Management Option 

Students in this option study the principles of economics, finance, risk, 
and the decision-making process as applied to the management of a 
farm enterprise. They develop skills necessary to combine and man- 
age labor, land, and capital resources for a competitive return. Stu- 
dents prepare for careers as a farm owner, tenant, or employee; as a 
professional farm manager for off-site owners; or as an appraiser, 
which requires additional course work for certification. 

HOURS 

3 

3-4 
3 
3 



REQUIRED FOR THE FARM MANAGEMENT OPTION IN 
ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products 

ACE 232 — Management of Farm Enterprises 

ACE 243 — Agricultural Finance 

ACE 332 — Decision Making in the Agricultural Firm 



Food and Agribusiness Management Option 

Students in this option study the principles, tools, and techniques of 
managing firms in the agri-food system. They develop skills in man- 
agement functions, strategy development and implementation, and 
awareness of the interaction between agricultural technology, supply, 
distribution, processing and marketing firms, and the business envi- 
ronment. Graduates begin their careers as management trainees, sales 
and marketing representatives, technical analysts, or in a specialty 
area such as marketing, procurement, or finance, in organizations 
involved in the production, marketing, sales, and financing of agricul- 
tural inputs, commodities, food ingredients, and food products. Joint 
programs are available with the Departments of Food Science and 
Human Nutrition (food processing), Natural Resource and Environ- 
mental Sciences (horticulture management), Crop Sciences, and Busi- 
ness Administration. 



HOURS 



REQUIRED FOR THE FOOD AND AGRIBUSINESS 

MANAGEMENT OPTION IN ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT 

REQUIREMENTS 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management 

ACE 233 — Agribusiness Market Planning 

ACE 331 — Strategic Management in Food and Agribusiness 

ACCY 202 — Accounting and Accountancy II 

AGCOM 270 — Agricultural Sales Communications 

One of: 

ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products 

ACE 288— Retail Market Analysis 

B ADM 202 — Principles of Marketing 



MAJOR IN COMMODITY, FOOD AND TEXTILE 
MARKETING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Commodity, Food and 
Textile Marketing 

Consumer and Textile Marketing Option 

Students in this option study marketing with applications to the textile 
sector of the economy. Relationships between production systems, 
distribution systems, and consumer issues are emphasized. Gradu- 
ates are prepared for positions in marketing research, retail manage- 
ment, product development, merchandising, and customer relations. 
Opportunities are found in textile manufacturing, wholesaling, and 
retailing as well as in auxiliary industries and firms providing advi- 
sory services. 

HOURS 



REQUIRED FOR THE CONSUMER AND TEXTILE 
MARKETING OPTION IN ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT 
REQUIREMENTS 

ACE 182 — Consumer Issues in Textile Marketing 

ACE 287— Textiles in the Global Economy 

ACE 288— Retail Market Analysis 

ACE 386— Public Policy and the Textile Industry 

B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 

B ADM 212— Principles of Retailing 



Markets and Price Analysis Option 

Students in this option study the marketing, pricing, and distribution 
of production inputs and services used by farmers; the marketing and 
pricing of grain and feed, livestock, and livestock products; and the 
marketing and pricing of processed food and fiber to consumers. 
Students may focus on the commodities futures markets. Graduates 
may work for a commodity firm as grain merchandisers, for a com- 
modity exchange, or with member firms trading commodities. Others 
find opportunities in marketing positions with seed, fertilizer, chemi- 
cal, food processing and distribution, or machinery firms. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE MARKETS AND PRICE ANALYSIS 

OPTION IN ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products 

3 ACE 327 — Commodity Price Analysis 

10-11 Three of: 

4 ACE 320 — Economics of Commodity Marketing 

4 ACE 325 — Economics of Food Marketing 

3 ACE 328 — Commodity Futures and Options Markets 

3 ACE 355 — International Trade in Food and 

Agriculture 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



47 



MAJOR IN INTERNATIONAL, RESOURCE AND 
CONSUMER ECONOMICS 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in International, 
Resource and Consumer Economics 

Consumer Economics and Finance Option 

Students in this option study consumer economics, personal finance, 
and economics to understand the role of consumers in the market 
place. Students may emphasize consumer economics, family econom- 
ics, or financial planning and counseling. Emphasis in consumer 
economics leads to careers in consumer affairs, consumer policy, 
consumer investigation and mediation, marketing and sales. Empha- 
sis in family economics prepares students for positions in government 
and public agencies. Financial planning and counseling students find 
positions in the financial services industry such as a planner, counse- 
lor, insurance agent, realtor, or stockbroker. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE CONSUMER ECONOMICS AND 

FINANCE OPTION IN ADDITION TO DEPARTMENT 
REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACE 245 — Personal Finance 

3 ACE 270 — Consumer Economics 

3 ACE 370— Family Economics 

3 ACE 374 — Economics of Consumption 

6 Two courses approved by the Department which may 

include: 

ACE 199B — Financial Planning and Counseling 

ACE 190D — Economic Information and Regulation 

ACE 371 — Consumer Economics Policy 

FIN 254 — Corporate Finance 

Environmental and Natural Resource Management Option 

Students in this option study economics, law, policy, management, 
administration, and quantitative methods important in addressing 
problems related to the quality of the environment and the manage- 
ment of natural resources. Students find positions in government, 
industry, consulting firms, public interest groups, and resource man- 
agement agencies such as the Bureau of Land Management. They also 
find opportunities as analysts, consultants, lobbyists, advocates, and 
managers. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL 

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OPTION IN ADDITION TO 
DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACE 210 — Economics of the Environment 

3 ACE 306 — Environmental Law 

3 ACE 310 — Intermediate Natural Resource Economics 

2 ACE 319 — Regional Environmental Management Simulation 

Individually Planned Curriculum Option 

Students choosing this option have the flexibility to tailor a program 
to suit their interests. Students may choose to study an issue in great 
depth or to explore a wide range of interests. The option can be used 
to prepare for graduate school or a professional degree program such 
as the M.B.A. or law. 

In addition to meeting department requirements, students pursu- 
ing the individually planned curriculum option must consult with 
their adviser to choose courses which will provide depth and quality 
of exposure to their individually identified topic. 

Policy, International Trade and Development Option 

Students in this option study what government policies are, why they 
are implemented, and whom they affect. Public sector institutions in 
developed and developing countries are examined in detail. The role 
of international trade and trade policy in economic performance is 
considered. Graduates are prepared for positions in firms with inter- 
national business; in federal or state government agencies dealing 
with policy, trade, or development; in consumer and producer groups; 
in trade organizations; and in public interest groups. 

HOURS REQUIRED FOR THE POLICY, INTERNATIONAL TRADE 

AND DEVELOPMENT OPTION IN ADDITION TO 
DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS 

3 ACE 251— The World Food Economy 

3 ACE 351 — Economics of International Development 

3 ACE 355 — International Trade in Food and Agriculture 

3 ACE 356 — Agricultural and Food Policies and Programs 

3 A course on the economy of a country other than the U.S. or a 

region other than North America such as: 



ACE 353 — Economic Development in South and Southeast 

Asia 
ACE 354 — Economic Development of Tropical Africa 
ECON 339 — The European Economies 
ECON 351 — The Development of the Japanese Economy 
ECON 352 — Economic Development in Latin America 
ECON 358— The Economy of China 

Department of Agricultural 
Engineering 

338 Agricultural Engineering Sciences Building 
1304 West Pennsylvania 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-3570 

DUAL MAJOR IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING AND IN 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science and the Degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in Agricultural Engineering- 
Agriculture Science 

This is a five-year program that results in a B.S. degree from the 
College of Engineering and a B.S. degree from the College of Agricul- 
tural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. The 158 hour curricu- 
lum meets the requirements for both degrees. 

Agricultural engineering is the integration of biological and physi- 
cal sciences as a foundation for engineering applications in agricul- 
ture, food systems, natural resources, the environment, and related 
biological systems. Agricultural engineers are involved in the design 
of systems which include food and bioprocess engineering, off-road 
equipment, bioenvironmental engineering of plant and animal facili- 
ties, water quality and systems for the utilization and protection of soil 
and water resources. Important design constraints are economics, 
conservation of materials and energy, safety, and environmental 
quality. Graduates are employed by industry, consulting firms, and 
government for research, education, and manufacturing. By choice of 
electives, students may direct their program towards a specialization 
in off-road equipment engineering, soil and water resource engineer- 
ing, bioenvironmental engineering, or food and bioprocess engineer- 
ing. Individual programs are checked by departmental advisers to 
insure that national engineering accreditation (ABET) requirements 
are met. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4-3 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

3 C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 

3 MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 

3 MATH 225— Introductory Matrix Theory 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations & Orthogonal Functions 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

4 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 
4 CHEM 102— General Chemistry 
4 PHYCS 111— Mechanics 

4 PHYCS 112— Electricity and Magnetism 

2 PHYCS 113— Fluid and Thermal Physics 

HOURS BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

10 Ten hours of biological sciences are required from biology, 

entomology, microbiology, plant biology, physiology, and 
zoology. Select at least eight of the ten hours from the 
following: 

BIOL 100*— Biological Sciences 
BIOL 101*— Biological Sciences 
BIOL 104*— Animal Biology 
CPSC 322— Forage Crops and Pastures 
ANSCI 202— Domestic Animal Physiology 
ANSCI 307- — Environmental Aspects of Animal 
Management 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



48 



GEOL 101 — Introduction to Physical Geology 

GEOL 250 — Geology for Engineers 

NRES 245 — Indoor Plant Culture, Uses and Identification 

NRES 345— Statistical Methods 

HORT 365 — Growth and Development of Horticultural 

Crops 
MCBIO 100* — Introduction to Microbiology 
MCBIO 101 — Introduction to Experimental Microbiology 
MCBIO 311 — Food and Industrial Microbiology 
MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 
PLBIO 100"— Plant Biology or Agronomy 121 
PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 
NRES 101— Introductory Soils 
CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Lab 
NRES 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 



AG E 385* — Food and Process Engineering Design 
AG E 387 — Grain Drying and Conditioning 
AG E 389 — Process Design for Corn Milling 



* Students must take at least one of these courses. 

HOURS HUMANITIES' AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 1 

18 To include ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture 
and Food, or ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles, or 
ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles. 

CULTURAL STUDIES 2 

One Western culture and one non-Westem/US minority 

culture course. 

1. Students must complete ACE 100, ECON 102 or ECON 103 and 15 additional hours 
of social sciences or humanities courses that satisfy the requirements of approved lists 
for the College of Engineering, the College of Agricultural, Consumer and 
Environmental Sciences, and the campus general education requirement. The College 
of Engineering requires one six-hour sequence in social science and one six-hour 
sequence in humanities from approved courses. Since these may differ, students 
should carefully select approved courses that meet the requirements for all of the lists. 

2. Work with adviser to select courses that also satisfy the social sciences and 
humanities requirements. 

HOURS AG E PRESCRIBED 

1 AG E 100 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 

4 AG E 221 — Engineering for Agricultural and Biological 

Systems 
4 AG E 222 — Engineering for Bioprocess and Bioenvironmental 

Systems 
1 AG E 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 

3 AG E 299— Undergraduate Thesis 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

3 ECE 205 — Introduction to Electrical & Electronic Circuits 

1 ECE 206— Lab to ECE 205 

3 G E 103 — Engineering Graphics I 

3-4 M E 209— Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer, or M E 205 — 

Thermodynamics, or CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 
3-4 STAT 310— Statistics, or MATH 363— Intro to Math Statistics 

and Probability, I, or CEE 293 — Engineering Modeling Under 

Uncertainty, or I E 230 — Analysis of Data 
2-3 TAM 150— Intro to Statics or TAM 152— Engineering 

Mechanics, I-Statics 
3 TAM 212 — Engineering Mechanics II-Dynamics 

3 TAM 221— Intro to Solid Mechanics 

3-4 TAM 235 — Intro to Fluid Mechanics, or CH E 371— Fluid 

Mechanics and Heat Transfer, or M E 211 — Introductory Gas 

Dynamics 

HOURS AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES 

15 Fifteen hours of agricultural sciences with courses from at 

least two departments other than Agricultural Engineering 
and approval of advisors are required. 

HOURS TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

19 Technical electives are upper level engineering courses. 
Students can choose from the recommended list below or by 
consent of adviser. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

At least 12 hours from: 

AG E 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanics 
AG E 271 — Transport Phenomena in Food Process Design 
AG E 277* — Design of Agricultural Structures 
AG E 287* — Environmental Control for Plants and 

Animals 
AG E 311" — Instrumentation and Measurements 
AG E 315 — Applied Machine Vision 
AG E 336* — Design of Agricultural Machinery 
AG E 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 
AG E 356* — Soil and Water Conservation Structures 
AG E 357* — Land Drainage 
AG E 383 — Engineering Properties of Food Materials 



'Students must take at least one of these courses. Includes major design experience. 
"This course is strongly recommended. 

OTHER TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Remainder of the 19 hours from: 

CEE 201 — Engineering Surveying or CEE 205 — Route 

Surveying and Design 
CEE 241— Air and Water Quality 

CEE 255* — Introduction to Hydrosystems Engineering 
CEE 261* — Introduction to Structural Engineering 
CEE 263 — Behavior and Design of Metal Structures 
CEE 264 — Reinforced Concrete Design 
CEE 280 — Introduction to Soil Mechanics and Foundation 

Engineering 
CEE 350— Surface Water Hydrology 
CEE 361 — Matrix Analysis of Framed structures 
CHEM 323 — Applied Electronics for Scientists 
CH E 261 — Introduction to Chemical Engineering 
CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 
CH E 371— Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 
CH E 373 — Mass Transfer Operations 
G E 288 — Engineering Economy and Operations Research 
M E 271 — Mechanical Design, I 
M E 231 — Engineering Materials 
M E 285 — Design for Manufacturability 
M E 307— Solar Energy Utilization 
M E 313 — Computer Controls of Mechanical Engineering 

Systems 
MFG E 210— Introduction to Manufacturing Systems 
MFG E 350 — Information Management for Manufacturing 

Systems 
or any 200 or 300 level engineering course approved by 

adviser 



*One of these courses is strongly recommended. 



HOURS 
11-14 



158 



OPEN ELECTIVES 

Sufficient open electives selected to total minimum 
curriculum requirement of 158 hours. All requirements of the 
combined curriculum must be completed to satisfy the 
requirements for both degrees. 
Total hours required to receive a B.S. in Agricultural 
Engineering and a B.S. in Agricultural Sciences. 



MAJOR IN TECHNICAL SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Technical Systems 
Management 

This major is designed to prepare students as problem solvers for 
systems involving the application, management, and /or marketing of 
agricultural engineering technologies. Students are instructed in engi- 
neering and business principles in preparation for professional ca- 
reers as entrepreneurs, marketing representatives, project managers, 
or plant managers working with service organizations, manufactur- 
ers, corporate farms, retail dealers, power suppliers, contractors, and 
management companies at every stage from production through 
processing and distribution. 

Students pursuing this major can select between three options: 
production systems; mechanization, marketing and technical sys- 
tems; and environmental systems. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

4 MATH 134 — Calculus for Social Sciences I, or equivalent 

3 Introductory statistics. See department for approved list. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

4 CHEM 101— General Chemistry, and CHEM 105— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

5 PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and Sound) 
4-5 PHYCS 102— General Physics (Light, Electricity, Magnetism, 

and Modern Physics), or CHEM 102 — General Chemistry and 
CHEM 106— General Chemistry Laboratory 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



49 



3-5 

3-5 

HOURS 

6 

HOURS 

4 
3 
3-4 



Biological sciences (see campus approved list) 
Physical sciences (see campus approved list) 

HUMANITIES 

Select from campus approved list. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

From at least two departments to include: 

ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture, and Food 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

Social sciences elective. Select from campus approved list. 

CULTURAL STUDIES' 

'Two courses; one Western culture and one non-Western/US 
minority culture course. 

1. Work with adviser to select courses that also satisfy the social sciences and 
humanities requirements. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications or equivalent 

3 ACCY 200— Fundamentals of Accounting or ACCY 201— 
Principles of Accounting I 

4 CPSC 121— Principles of Field Crop Science 
4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

3 TSM 100— Technical Systems in Agriculture 

1 TSM 299 — Technical Systems Management Seminar 

HOURS TSM ELECTIVES 

18 TSM elective courses. A total of 18 hours selected from the 

following courses. A minimum of six hours must be at the 300 
level. 

TSM 199— Undergraduate Seminar 
TSM 200 — Construction Technology 
TSM 202 — Welding Processes, Metallurgy, and Materials 
TSM 203— Electric Wiring, Motors, and Controls 
TSM 221 — Farm Power and Machinery Management 
TSM 250 — Agricultural Mechanization Internship 
TSM 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation 
TSM 271 — Engineering Applications in Residential 

Housing 
TSM 272— Farm Buildings 
TSM 281 — Grain Drying, Handling, and Storage 
TSM 300— Special Problems 
TSM 331 — Farm Machinery Technology 
TSM 333 — Agricultural Chemical Applications Systems 
TSM 341 — Engine and Tractor Power 
TSM 372 — Livestock Waste Management 
TSM 381 — Electrical and Microcomputer Controls for 

Agriculture 

HOURS OPTION ELECTIVES 

15 Option elective courses. See specific requirements for each 

option listed below. 

HOURS OPEN ELECTIVES 

18-21 Additional free elective courses selected to meet the required 

126 hours for graduation. 
126 Total credit hours required for the B.S. degree. 

Mechanization, Marketing, and Technology Management 
Systems Option 

Mechanization, marketing and technology management systems is 
designed for students interested in the management, marketing, and/ 
or application of technical systems in agriculture. The focus of this 
option is to prepare individuals as technically competent profession- 
als for all aspects of the agricultural and food industries. 

OPTION ELECTIVES 

15* Choose from the following: 

AGCOM 270 — Agricultural Sales Communications 
AGCOM 280— Leadership Development 
ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products 
ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management or 

BA210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 
ACE 233 — Agribusiness Market Planning 
ACE 243 — Agricultural Finance 
ACE 303— Agricultural Law 

ACE 328 — Commodity Futures and Options Markets 
ACE 356 — Agricultural Policies and Programs 
B ADM 200 — Legal Environment of Business 
B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 
B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 
B ADM 247 — Introduction to Management (no credit if had 

B ADM 210) 



B ADM 202 — Management and Organizational Behavioral 

B ADM 261 — Summary of Business Law 

B ADM 274 — Operations Research 

B ADM 314— Production 

B ADM 315 — Management in Manufacturing 

B ADM 320— Marketing Research 

B ADM 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations 

B&T W 271— Persuasive Writing 

FIN 254 — Introduction to Business Financial Management 

FIN 264— Fundamentals of Real Estate 



*Six hours of course work must be at the 300 level. 

Production Systems Option 

Production systems is designed for those students interested in learn- 
ing about and working within the production enterprise. Students in 
this option learn marketing, management, and application of the 
technical systems relative to a production agriculture enterprise. 



HOURS 

15* 



OPTION ELECTIVES 

Choose from the following: 
ACE 203— Rural Taxation 

ACE 222 — Marketing of Commodity and Food Products 
ACE 232 — Management of Farm Enterprises 
ACE 243 — Agricultural Finance 
ACE 303— Agricultural Law 
ACE 320 — Economics of Commodity Marketing 
ACE 328 — Commodity Futures and Options Markets 
ACE 332 — Decision-Making in the Agricultural Firm 
ACE 334 — Professional Farm Management 
ACE 348— Rural Real Estate Appraisal 
ANSCI 221— Animal Nutrition 
ANSCI 283— Beef Cattle and Swine Production 
ANSCI — Any animal production class 
CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 
CPSC 318— Crop Growth and Production 
CPSC 321— Biological Control of Insect Pests 
CPSC 322— Forage Crops and Pastures 
NRES 264 — Commercial Vegetable Production 
NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 
NRES 374 — Soil Conservation and Management 



*Six hours of course work must be at the 300 level. 

Environmental Systems Option 

Environmental systems is designed for those students interested in 
environmental systems as they relate to the agricultural and food 
industries. The focus of this option is the study of technical systems 
and their management as they relate to the interface between the 
physical and biological science components of agriculture. 

OPTION ELECTIVES 



15* 



Choose from the following: 

ACE 210 — Economics of the Environment 

ACE 306 — Environmental Law 

ACE 310 — Intermediate Natural Resource Economics 

ACE 319 — Regional Environmental Management 

Simulation 
ANSCI 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal 

Management 
B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 
CEE 241— Air and Water Quality 
CEE 341 — Regional Environmental Management 

Simulation 
ENVST 236 — Tomorrow's Environment 
NRES 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 
NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 
NRES 374 — Soils Conservation and Management 



*Six hours of course work must be at the 300 level. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



50 



Department of Animal Sciences 

116 Animal Sciences Laboratory 
1207 West Gregory Drive 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-3462 

MAJOR IN ANIMAL SCIENCES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences 

Students pursuing this major have two options: management and 
science. 

Management Option 

The management option is designed for students intending to pursue 
a career in animal management or one of the associated industries on 
completion of their undergraduate degree. It emphasizes the scientific 
disciplines involved in animal production and includes business 
courses. Students must complete the requirements in one of several 
specializations along with the common core requirements of the 
curriculum. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

4-5 MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists, I or MATH 120— 

Calculus and Analytical Geometry, I 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications, or C S 101 — 

Introduction to Computing for Application to Engineering 
and Physical Science, or C S 103 — Introduction to Computing 
with Application to Social and Behavioral Sciences, or C S 
105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Business and Commerce, or equivalent 

3 ACE 232 — Management of the Farm Enterprises, or ACCY 

200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or ACCY 201 — Principles 
of Accounting, I 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

3, 1 CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 
3, 1 CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological Version) and 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

3 CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry or ANSCI 290— 
Introduction to Metabolism in Domestic Animals 

8-9 Two courses selected from the following: 

BIOL 104 — Animal Biology 
MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 

101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 
PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Courses selected from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES' 

9 Approved courses selected from at least two departments to 

include: 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 One Western culture and one non-Western/U.S. minority 

culture course. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 

and Environmental Sciences 

HOURS ANIMAL SCIENCES PRESCRIBED 

7-8 Two courses selected from: 

4 ACE 100' — Economics of Resources, Agriculture, 

and Food 
3 TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 

or FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and 

Human Nutrition 
3-4 CPSC 121— Principles of Field Crop Science or 

NRES 101— Introduction to Soils or NRES 103— 

Introduction to Horticulture 

4 ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 



4 
4 
4 
1-4 



ANSCI 202— Domestic Animal Physiology 

ANSCI 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 

ANSCI 221— Animal Nutrition 

ANSCI 250— Animal Sciences Internship or ANSCI 299- 

Animal Management Field Studies 

ANSCI 298— Undergraduate Seminar 



1. Students who do not take ACE 100 must enroll in ECON 102 as part of the Social 
Sciences requirement. 

OPTION SPECIALIZATIONS 



HOURS 

12 



HOURS 

12 



HOURS 

16 



HOURS 

16-17 



HOURS 

12-13 



HOURS 

12-13 



HOURS 

12 



TOTAL 

40 



126 



BEEF 

ANSCI 119— Meat Technology or ANSCI 209— Meat Animal 

and Carcass Evaluation 

ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 

ANSCI 301— Beef Production 

ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 

COMPANION ANIMALS 

ANSCI 206— Horse Management 

ANSCI 207 — Companion Animal Management 

ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 

ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 

DAIRY 

ANSCI 201— Principles of Dairy Production 
ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 
ANSCI 300— Dairy Herd Management 
ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 
ANSCI 308 — Lactation Biology 

MEATS 

ANSCI 119— Meat Technology 

ANSCI 209 — Meat Animal and Carcass Evaluation 

ANSCI 309— Meat Science 

ANSCI 201 — Principles of Dairy Production, or 

ANSCI 301— Beef Production, or 

ANSCI 302— Sheep Production, or 

ANSCI 303— Pork Production, or 

ANSCI 304— Poultry Science 

ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products 

POULTRY 

ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 

ANSCI 304— Poultry Science 

ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 

ANSCI 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal Management 

SHEEP 

ANSCI 119— Meat Technology or ANSCI 209— Meat Animal 

and Carcass Evaluation 

ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 

ANSCI 302— Sheep Production 

ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 

SWINE 

ANSCI 119— Meat Technology or ANSCI 209— Meat Animal 

and Carcass Evaluation 

ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 

ANSCI 303— Pork Production 

ANSCI 305— Genetics and Animal Improvement 

Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must equal at 
least 40 hours. 

Additional elective courses must be completed to yield at 
least 126 total hours for graduation. 



Science Option 

The science option is specifically designed for students interested in 
graduate or professional training, or in technical positions after the 
undergraduate degree. It is intended to satisfy most of the entrance 
requirements to post-graduate programs, but students should consult 
the entrance requirements of specific programs they intend to pursue. 
The option emphasizes basic science courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of Animal Sciences and other departments of the University. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



51 



QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists, I or MATH 120— 

Calculus and Analytical Geometry, I 

OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 
Choose one of the following: 

ACE 161 — Microcomputers in Agriculture 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing for Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 
C S 103 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 
C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Business and Commerce or equivalent. 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND STATISTICS 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 

CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological Version) and 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological 

Version) 

Five courses selected from the following with at least two 

chosen from the first three: 

4 BIOL 104— Animal Biology 

3,2 MCBIO 100 — Introductory Microbiology and 
MCBIO 101 — Introductory Experimental 
Microbiology 

4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

3,2 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry and 

CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory 
3 BIOCH 350— Introductory Biochemistry or ANSCI 

290 — Introduction to Metabolism in Domestic 

Animals 

5 PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and 
Sound) 

3 STAT 100— Statistics or CPSC 141— Introduction to 
Applied Statistics 

HUMANITIES 

Courses selected from campus approved list. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 1 

Approved courses selected from at least two departments to 
include: 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

CULTURAL STUDIES 

One Western culture and one non-Western/U.S. minority 
culture course. 

ACES PRESCRIBED 

ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

ANIMAL SCIENCES PRESCRIBED 

Two courses selected from: 

4 ACE 100 1 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture, 
and Food 

3 TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 

or FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and 
Human Nutrition 
3-4 CPSC 121— Principles of Field Crop Science or 
NRES 101— Introduction to Soils or NRES 102— 
Introduction to Forestry or NRES 103 — Introduction 
to Horticulture 
ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 
ANSCI 202 — Domestic Animal Physiology 
ANSCI 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 
ANSCI 221— Animal Nutrition 
ANSCI 231— Biology of Reproduction 
ANSCI 298— Undergraduate Seminar 
Four of the following courses: 

3 ANSCI 203 — Behavior of Domestic Animals, or 

ANSCI 346— Animal Behavior 
3 ANSCI 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement 

3 ANSCI 306— Equine Science 

3 ANSCI 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal 
Management 

4 ANSCI 308— Lactation Biology 
4 ANSCI 309— Meat Science 

3 ANSCI 310 — Immunogenetics and 

Immunophysiology 
3-4 ANSCI 312 — Animal Growth and Development 
3-4 ANSCI 316— Population Genetics 
3-4 ANSCI 317— Quantitative Genetics 
3 ANSCI 320— Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of 

Ruminants 
3 ANSCI 321 — Minerals and Vitamins in Metabolism 

3 ANSCI 322 — Companion Animals Nutrition 



3-4 



40 
126 



3 ANSCI 331 — Physiology of Reproduction in 
Domestic Animals 

4 ANSCI 345— Statistical Methods 

3-4 ANSCI 358— Mathematical Modeling in Life 
Sciences 

3 ANSCI 385 — Gastrointestinal and Methanogenic 

Microbial Fermentations 

3 ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food 

Products 
One of the following courses: 

3 ANSCI 119— Meat Technology 

3 ANSCI 201— Principles of Dairy Production 

3 ANSCI 206— Horse Management 

3 ANSCI 207 — Companion Animal Management 

3 ANSCI 209 — Meat Animal and Carcass Evaluation 

3 ANSCI 300— Dairy Herd Management 

3 ANSCI 301— Beef Production 

3-4 ANSCI 302— Sheep Production 

3 ANSCI 303— Pork Production 

3-4 ANSCI 304— Poultry Science 
Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must equal at 
least 40 hours 
Total 2 



1. Students who do not take ACE 100 must enroll in Econ 102 as part of the social 
sciences requirement. 

2. Additional elective courses must be completed to yield at least 126 total hours for 
graduation 

Department of Crop Sciences 

AW-101 Turner 

1102 South Goodwin Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-3420 

MAJOR IN CROP SCIENCES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Crop Sciences 

The major in crop sciences is designed for students with an interest in 
agronomic crop plants. There are six options under the crop sciences 
major. Students can study the diversity of crop plants — how they 
grow and are grown — in the crops option. In the plant protection 
option, students learn how to protect plants from the effects of 
diseases, insects, and weeds. The intersection between crop plants and 
their environment is emphasized in the agroecology option. Students 
in the crop agribusiness option learn about crop sciences and about 
agribusiness management. The plant biotechnology and molecular 
biology option is designed for students interested in molecular as- 
pects of crop plants and their interactions with other organisms. The 
biological sciences option provides a flexible framework of basic and 
applied science courses. In each of these options students receive a 
strong grounding in science which can lead to employment or, with 
suitable choice of electives, to graduate or professional study. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

4-5 MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists or 120— Calculus 

and Analytical Geometry 
3-4 One course in statistics. See College of ACES Handbook for 

approved courses. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

8 CHEM 101— General Chemistry and 102— General Chemistry 

(Biological or Physical Version), and Chem 105 — General 
Chemistry Laboratory and CHEM 106 - General Chemistry 
Laboratory 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



52 



HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

4 ACE 100 — Economics of Resources Agriculture, and Food (not 

required in Biological Sciences Option) 

3 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

HOURS CPSC PRESCRIBED 

4 CPSC 121 — Principles of Field Crop Sciences (students in 
plant protection option may elect NRES 103) 

1 CPSC 290 — Undergraduate Crop Sciences Seminar 

Agroecology Option 

The agroecology option addresses ecologically based management of 
cropping systems, stewardship of the environment, and sustainable 
food production systems. This option is designed to prepare students 
for careers in integrated plant health management, crop consulting, 
and agrichemical management, or for entrance into graduate school. 
A minimum of 126 hours is required for graduation. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

3 CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

3 CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 

3 CPSC 310— Principles of Plant Protection or CPSC 321— 

Biological Control of Insect Pests 

3 CPSC 337 — Ecology of Cropping Systems 

3-5 EEE 212— Basic Ecology or CPSC 140— Ecology of 

Agricultural and Forest Systems 
4-5 MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 101— 

Introductory Experimental Microbiology or BIOL 104 — 

Animal Biology 

4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

3 PL PA 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 

4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

3 NRES 374 — Soil Conservation and Management or 375 — Soil 

Microbiology 
6 Two courses from the following: 

CPSC 318 — Crop Growth and Production 

CPSC 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 

CPSC 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 

CPSC 326 — Weed Management in Agronomic Crops 

NRES 368 — Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

NRES 371— Pedology 

PL PA 325 — Disease of Ornamental and Turfgrasses 

PL PA 377— Diseases of Field Crops 
40 Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 40 

hours, of which 20 hours must be completed in residence. 

Biological Sciences Option 

The biological sciences option provides students with a strong science 
background and flexibility in course selection. This option is designed 
for students who plan to pursue graduate studies in plant sciences or 
biological sciences, or who want to obtain professional positions that 
require a very strong science background. A minimum of 126 hours is 
required for graduation. 

HOURS 

3 



35 



Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 35 
hours, of which 20 hours must be completed in residence. 



3-5 



6-8 



3-4 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES: 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 
Choose one of the following: 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 
101— Introductory Experimental Microbiology 

BIOCH 350— Introductory Biochemistry 

CSB 300— Cell Biology I 

PHYCS 101 — General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and 
Sound) 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 
Choose one course from the following: 

CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 

PLPA 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 
Two courses from the following: 

CPSC 205 — Genetic Engineering Laboratory 

CPSC 221 — Biotechnology in Agriculture 

CPSC 315 — Genetics of Higher Organisms 

CPSC 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

CPSC 330— Plant Physiology 
One course from the following: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 

NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 

NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 



Crop Agribusiness Option 

The option in crop agribusiness is designed for students wanting to 
combine agronomic production and business management. This op- 
tion prepares students for careers in production and marketing, 
cropping systems management, and a broad range of multi-functional 
agricultural enterprises, or for entrance into graduate school. A mini- 
mum of 126 hours is required for graduation. 



HOURS 

3 

3 
3 
3-5 



4 
4 
3 
3-4 



40 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting or 201 — Principles 

of Accounting, I 

CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 

Select from the following: 

PLBIO 234 — Form and Function in Flowering Plants 

BIOL 104— Animal Biology 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 
101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 
PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 
NRES 101— Introductory Soils 
PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 
One course from the following: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 

FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 
Nutrition 

NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 

TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 
Select from the following: 

CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 

CPSC 310— Principles of Plant Protection 

CPSC 318— Crop Growth and Production 

CPSC 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 

CPSC 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

CPSC 326 — Weed Management in Agronomic Crops 

CPSC 336 — Perennial Grass Ecosystems 

CPSC 337 — Ecology of Cropping Systems 

CPSC 377— Diseases of Field Crops 
Select from the following: 

NRES 348— Rural Real Estate Appraisal 

NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

NRES 372— Soil Testing Practicum 

NRES 374 — Soil Conservation and Management 
One course from each pair of the following business-related 
courses: 

ACE 222 — Marketing Commodity and Food Products or 
B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management or ACE 
232 — Management of Farm Enterprises 

ACE 243— Agricultural Finance or FIN 254— Corporate 
Finance 
Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 40 
hours, of which 20 must be completed in residence. 



Crops Option 

The crops option is designed for students with an interest in agro- 
nomic crop plants. This option prepares students for careers in crop 
production and marketing, cropping systems management, plant 
breeding, and seed merchandising, or for entrance into graduate 
school. A minimum of 126 hours is required for graduation. 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4-5 



4 
3-4 



12 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

CPSC 226 — Introduction to Weed Science 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 

NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 101- 

Introductory Experimental Microbiology or BIOL 104 — 

Animal Biology 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

One course from the following: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 

FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Sciences and Human 

Nutrition 
TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 

Select from the following: 

CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 
CPSC 310— Principles of Plant Protection 
CPSC 315— Genetics of Higher Organisms 
CPSC 318 — Crop Growth and Production 
CPSC 319— Environment and Plant Ecosystems 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



S3 



40 



CPSC 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 

CPSC 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

CPSC 324— Plant Breeding Methods 

CPSC 326 — Weed Management in Agronomic Crops 

CPSC 330— Plant Physiology 

CPSC 336 — Perennial Grass Ecosystems 

CPSC 337— Ecology of Cropping Systems 

CPSC 350— Crops and Society 

CPSC 377— Diseases of Field Crops 
Select from the following: 

NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

NRES 371— Pedology 

NRES 372— Soil Testing Practicum 

NRES 374 — Soil Conservation and Management 

NRES 375— Soil Microbiology 

NRES 376— Field Pedology 

NRES 381— Laboratory Methods for Soils Research 

NRES 383— Soil Mineralogy 

NRES 387— Soil Chemistry 

NRES 388— The Physics of the Plant Environment 
Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 40 
hours, of which 20 hours must be completed in residence. 



Plant Biotechnology And Molecular Biology Option 

The plant biotechnology and molecular biology option provides a 
curriculum that prepares students for careers in biotechnology or for 
entrance into graduate school. The basic sciences are emphasized, 
including a strong foundation in biology and genetics. Students are 
encouraged to participate in undergraduate independent study in a 
molecular biology laboratory. A minimum of 126 hours is required for 
graduation. 



HOURS 

3 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 
6-8 



3-4 



3-4 



10-15 



30 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

CPSC 205 — Genetic Engineering Laboratory 

CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 

CPSC 221 — Biotechnology in Agriculture 

CPSC 315 — Genetics of Higher Organisms 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Two courses from the following: 

CPSC 318— Crop Growth and Production 

CPSC 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

CPSC 330— Plant Physiology 

CPSC 333— Plant Physiology Laboratory 

PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 
One course from the following: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 

FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Nutrition 

NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 

NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 

TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 
One course from the following: 

BIOCHEM 350— Introduction Biochemistry 

CSB 300— Cell Biology, I 

CSB 301— Cell Biology, II 

MCBIO 316 — Genetic Analysis of Microorganisms 

MCBIO 330 — Molecular Biology of Microorganisms 

PLBIO 338— Plant Molecular Biology 
Three courses from the following: 

BIO 104— Animal Biology 

BIO 120 — Genetics, Evolution, and Biodiversity 

BIO 121 — Ecology and Organismic Biology 

BIO 122— Molecular and Cellular Biology 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 
101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology or 
MCBIO 200— Microbiology and 201— Experimental 
Microbiology 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology or 234— Form and Function in 
Flowering Plants 
Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 30 
hours, of which 15 must be completed in residence. 



Plant Protection Option 

The plant protection option provides a broad selection of courses in 
crops, soils, plant diseases, insects and weeds, and the physical 
sciences. This option is designed to prepare students for careers in 
crop consulting, integrated pest management, and agribusiness man- 
agement and merchandising, or for entrance into graduate school. A 
minimum of 130 hours is required for graduation. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry 

3 CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 



3-4 

3 

3-5 
3 
3-6 



4 
3 

3 
3 
3-4 



12 



40 



CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics or CPSC 330— Plant 

Physiology 

CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 

CPSC 250 — Crop Sciences Internship 

CPSC 310— Principles of Plant Protection 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and 101— 

Introductory Experimental Biology or BIOL 104 — Animal 

Biology or PLBIO 234 — Form and Functioning Flowering 

Plants 

NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

Select one from the following 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 
FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 

Nutrition 
NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 
NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 
TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 

One course selected from the following: 
CPSC 318— Crop Growth and Production 
NRES 261— Small Fruit and Viticulture Science 
NRES 262— Tree Fruit Science 
NRES 264 — Commercial Vegetable Production 

Select from the following: 

CPSC 326 — Weed Management in Agronomics Crops 
ENTOM 302 — Classification and Evolutionary History of 

Insects 
ENTOM 315— Insect Ecology 

ENTOM 319 — Fundametals of Insect Pest Management 
ENTOM 321— Biological Control of Insect Pests 
PL PA 301 — Biology and Ecology of Plant Pathogens, Fungi 

and Nematodes 
PL PA 302— Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Nematode Lab 
PL PA 303— Viral and Bacterial Pathogens of Plants 
PL PA 325 — Diseases of Ornamentals and Turf Grasses 
PL PA 377— Disease of Field Crops 
TSM 333 — Agricultural Chemical Applications Systems 

Total ACES prescribed and elective courses must total 40 

hours, of which 20 must be completed in residence. 



Department of Food Science and 
Human Nutrition 

260 Bevier Hall 

905 South Goodwin Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 244-4498 

MAJOR IN FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Food Science and 
Human Nutrition 

Students pursuing this major have five options: food science, food 
industry and business, dietetics, human nutrition, and hospitality 
management. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 



HOURS 

4 



HOURS 

3 

HOURS 

4-5 



3-4 

HOURS 

3,1 



3,1 

3 
2 



COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 

SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

COMPOSITION II 

Select from campus approved list. 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

Choose one of the following: 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytical Geometry, I 

4 MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists, I 

5 MATH 135— Calculus 

Statistics course. Consult College of ACES Handbook. 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 

CHEM 102 — General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) and CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

MCBIO 100 — Introductory Microbiology 

MCBIO 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



54 



HOURS HUMANITIES 

9 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

9 Select from campus approved list and/or see individual 

option. 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED COURSE 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in the Agricultural, 
Consumer and Environmental Sciences 

Food Science Option 

This option exposes students to all components of food production: 
harvesting and raw-product handling, food-processing procedures 
and techniques, packaging, and food storage. Students selecting this 
option are prepared for careers in many areas of the food industry. A 
minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

2 CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

2 MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 

5 PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and Sound) 

5 PHYCS 102— General Physics (Light, Electricity, Magnetism 

and Modern Physics) 
4-5 Select one course from: 

4 BIOL 104— Animal Biology 

5 BIOL 120 — Genetics, Evolution and Biodiversity 
4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

4 PHYSL 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 

HOURS FSHN PRESCRIBED 

3 FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 
Nutrition 

3 FSHN 202— Sensory Evaluation of Foods 

4 FSHN 213— Food Analysis I 

4 FSHN 260 — Raw Materials for Processing 

1 FSHN 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 

4 FSHN 314— Food Chemistry and Nutrition I 

3 FSHN 324 — Biochemical Aspects of Human Nutrition 

3 FSHN 360— Food Engineering 

3 FSHN 361— Food Processing I 

3 FSHN 362— Food Processing II 

3 FSHN 371— Food and Industrial Microbiology 

2 FSHN 372 — Sanitation in Food Processing 

Food Industry and Business Option 

This option is designed for students interested in integrating science, 
technology, business, and communications with the goal of pursuing 
professional and management careers in food and food-related indus- 
tries. The core program comprises science, food science, nutrition, 
business, and communications, and is supplemented by a 12-credit- 
hour specialization in a recommended area, such as food quality and 
safety, nutrition, business, or communications. Special emphasis is 
placed on areas of concern to consumers and to the food industry, such 
as food safety, sensory evaluation, nutrition, and health. The total 
number of hours required for graduation is 126. 

HOURS 

3 

3 
3-4 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

ACE 222— Marketing and Food Products or B ADM 202— 
Principles of Marketing 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management or B ADM 
210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 
At least one course from the following suggested electives: 
3 ACCY 201— Principles of Accounting, I 

3 B ADM 200 — The Legal Environment of Business 

3 B ADM 212— Principles of Retailing 

3 B ADM 320— Marketing Research 

3 B ADM 337 — Promotion Management 

3 B ADM 344 — Buyer Behavior 

3 ACE 233 — Agribusiness Market Planning 

3 ACE 243— Agricultural Finance 

4 ACE 325 — Economics of Food Marketing 

3 ACE 331 — Strategic Marketing in Food and 

Agribusiness 
3 ACE 333 — Practicum in Food and Agribusiness 

Management 
CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 
MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 
PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 



HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

9 Total to include: 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology or PSYCH 

103 — Introduction to Experimental Psychology 
3-4 ACE 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics or 
ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 

HOURS FSHN PRESCRIBED 

3 FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 

Nutrition 

3 FSHN 131— Food Management 

3 FSHN 202— Sensory Evaluation of Foods 

3 FSHN 220— Principles of Nutrition 

3 FSHN 231— Science of Foods 

4 FSHN 260 — Raw Materials for Processing 

1 FSHN 298— Undergraduate Seminar 

5 FSHN 330— The Experimental Study of Foods 
3 FSHN 365 — Principles of Food Technology 

3 FSHN 371 — Food and Industrial Microbiology 

2 FSHN 372— Sanitation in Food Processing 

HOURS ELECTIVE OPTIONS. 

12 A minimum of 12 hours from courses, approved by the 

adviser, in specialty area outside Food Science and Human 
Nutrition. At least six of the hours must be in 200- or 300-level 
courses. During the semester the student expects to graduate, 
he or she must submit to the college a statement, signed by 
his or her adviser, that indicates that the courses taken in the 
area of secondary specialization are appropriate. 

Dietetics Option 

This option is an approved Didactic Program in Dietetics that meets 
American Dietetic Association requirements and qualifies students 
for competitive dietetic internships. Upon completion of a postgradu- 
ate internship, students selecting this option may take the examina- 
tion to become registered dietitians. Students choosing this option 
who do not complete an internship will be prepared for entry-level 
supervisory positions in food service facilities and in the food and 
pharmaceutical industries. A minimum of 126 hours of credit is 
required for graduation. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications 

3 B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior or 

B ADM 247 — Introduction to Management 
3 B ADM 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations, or 

B ADM 351— Personnel Administration, or PSYCH 245— 

Industrial Organizational Psychology 



HOURS 

3 
2 
3 
4 

HOURS 

3-4 
3 

3-4 

HOURS 

3 

3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 

3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4-10 



NATURAL SCIENCES 

CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

BIOCH 350 — Introductory Biochemistry 

PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 

ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles or ECON 103— 

Macroeconomic Principles 

HDFS 105 — Introduction to Human Development or HDFS 

203 — Infancy and Early Development 

FSHN PRESCRIBED 

FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 

Nutrition 

FSHN 131— Food Management 

FSHN 149— Applied Food Service Sanitation 

FSHN 220— Principles of Nutrition 

FSHN 229 — Communication Techniques in Nutrition 

FSHN 231— Science of Foods 

FSHN 240 — Management of Quality Food Production and 

Service 

FSHN 245 — Purchasing for the Hospitality Industry 

FSHN 297— Seminar in Dietetics 

FSHN 320 — Nutritional Aspects of Disease 

FSHN 324 — Biochemical Aspects of Human Nutrition 

FSHN 329 — Therapeutic Nutrition and Assessment 

Two courses from: 

3 FSHN 202— Sensory Evaluation of Foods 

2 FSHN 322— Nutrition Through the Life Cycle 

3 FSHN 323— Pediatric Nutrition 

4 FSHN 328— Community Nutrition 

5 FSHN 330— The Experimental Study of Foods 

4 FSHN 350— Hospitality Management: Skills and 

Application 
3 FSHN 371 — Food and Industrial Microbiology 

1-5 FSHN 399— Problems in Foods 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



55 



4 BIOCH 355 — Biochemistry Laboratory 

3 KINES 252 — Bioenergetics of Human Movement 

3 CHLTH 204— Foundations of Health Behavior 

3 CHLTH 210— Health Program Development 

3 CHLTH 250— Health Care Systems 

Human Nutrition Option 

This option focuses on the field of human nutrition and reflects the 
growing need to prepare individuals for careers in health, dietetics, 
and nutrition. For students who expect to pursue advanced degrees in 
nutritional sciences or professional degrees in medicine, dentistry or 
law, the human nutrition option may be chosen. The option empha- 
sizes a strong science background and allows students to obtain a 
strong human nutrition preparation that is not available elsewhere on 
campus. The total number of hours required for graduation is 126. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry 

2 CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 
3-8 BIOCH 350— Introductory Biochemistry or BIOCH 352— 

General Biochemistry and BIOCH 353— General 
Biochemistry 

4 PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 

HOURS FSHN PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 
Nutrition 

3 FSHN 220— Principles of Nutrition 

3 FSHN 320— Nutritional Aspects of Disease 

3 FSHN 324 — Biochemical Aspects of Human Nutrition 

3 ANSCI 321 — Minerals and Vitamins in Metabolism 

6-9 FSHN electives must include two 200 or 300 level FSHN 

courses excluding FSHN 399 or other required FSHN courses. 

HOURS BASIC/APPLIED SCIENCE ELECTIVES 

8-15 Selected in consultation with adviser. 

Hospitality Management Option 

The hospitality management option is designed for students inter- 
ested in integrating the basic principles of business and hospitality 
management with the goal of pursuing professional and management 
careers in hospitality-related industries. The core program comprises 
35 hours of hospitality-related course work, including food science, 
food management, nutrition, sanitation, purchasing, and the manage- 
ment of institutional, commercial, catering and fine dining facilities. 
This option is unique compared to hospitality management programs 
offered at other institutions in that it is science-based. The total 
number of hours required for graduation is 126. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3 B ADM 200— The Legal Environment of Business or B ADM 

261 — Summary of Business Law 
3 B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 

3 B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

3 B ADM 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations, or 

B ADM 351— Personnel Administration, or PSYCH 245— 
Industrial Organizational Psychology 

4 VOTEC 387 — Training Programs in Business and Industry 
3 ACCY 201— Principles of Accounting, I 

3 ACCY 202— Principles of Accounting, II 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications 

2 ANSCI 109 — Meat Purchasing and Preparation 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

11-12 Select from: 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology or PSYCH 
103 — Introduction to Experimental Psychology 

3-4 ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture, and 

Food or ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 
4 SOC 100— Introduction to Sociology 

HOURS FSHN PRESCRIBED 

3 FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 
Nutrition 

3 FSHN 120— Contemporary Nutrition 

3 FSHN 131 — Food Management 

3 FSHN 140 — Introduction to the Hospitality Industry 

2 FSHN 145 — Introduction to Hospitality Management 
1 FSHN 149— Applied Food Service Sanitation 

3 FSHN 231— Science of Foods 

4 FSHN 240 — Management of Quality Food Production 

3 FSHN 245 — Purchasing for the Hospitality Industry 

4 FSHN 250— Food and Nutrition Internship 
3 FSHN 341 — Managing Catering Operations 

3 FSHN 350 — Hospitality Management: Skills and Applications 

4 FSHN 355— Management of Fine Dining 



Department of Human and Community 
Development 

274 Bevier Hall 

805 South Goodwin Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-3790 

MAJOR IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY 
STUDIES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Human Development 
and Family Studies 

The Human Development and Family Studies program prepares 
students for a variety of careers in human services, early childhood 
education, and public service, or for advanced study in individual and 
family development. Students can concentrate on their special inter- 
ests in human development, such as infancy, early childhood, or 
adolescence, or in family studies, such as the marital relationship, 
parent-child interaction, family change, or conflict and conflict man- 
agement in the family. Basic courses in these areas are linked to 
practical experiences in educational and community settings. Such 
experiences help graduating students to find placement in a graduate 
educational program or in employment in areas of greatest interest to 
them, such as child care services, family life education, human ser- 
vices, marriage and family counseling, pediatric services in hospitals, 
cooperative extension work, or business activities related to children 
and families. Students select one of two options within this major: 
Child and Adolescent Development or Family Studies. Issues related 
to cultural diversity and gender are emphasized in most courses. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Composition or equivalent (see college 

Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101- Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 See Campus Approved list. Students are encourage to select 

one of the following: 

HDFS 301 — Issues in Socialization and Development 
HDFS 315 — Critical Transitions in Families 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

3-5 Choose one of the following: 

MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

MATH 124 — Finite Mathematics 

MATH 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists, I 

3-5 Statistics course. Consult College of ACES Handbook. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

3 ANTH 143 — Biological Bases of Human Behavior 

3 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 
4 SOC 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

3 HDFS 210 — Comparative Family Organization 

3-4 Choose one of the following: 

ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture and Food 

ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from 

non-Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved 

list. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications 

6 Two ACES courses selected from outside HDFS 



HOURS HCD PRESCRIBED 

3 FSHN 120— Contemporary Nutrition or CHLTH 100— 

Contemporary Health 
3 HDFS 105 — Introduction to Human Development 

3 HDFS 106 — Observation and Assessment of Human 

Development 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



56 



126 



HDFS 110 — Introduction to Family Studies 

R SOC 110— Introduction to Rural Society or AGCOM 114 — 

Agricultural Communications Media and Methods 

Total (additional courses must be completed to yield a total of 
126 hours for graduation) 



Child and Adolescent Development Option 

The child and adolescent development option combines course work 
with valuable practical experiences to provide students with a broad 
base of knowledge regarding the physical, cognitive, and social devel- 
opment of children and adolescents. The diverse types of positions 
taken by graduates of this option include early childhood educator, 
parent educator, child life specialist, adoption caseworker, and direc- 
tor of a day care center. 

HOURS PRESCRIBED COURSES: 

3-6 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 202 — Development of Curriculum for Infants and 

preschoolers 
HDFS 319 — Professionalism and Supervision in Child 

Development Settings 
HDFS 320 — Organization and Administration of Child 

Development Programs 
HDFS 350 — Practicum in Human Development and Family 

Studies 
4 HDFS 203 — Infancy and Early Development 

3 HDFS 225— Middle Childhood 

4 HDFS 301 — Issues in Socialization and Development 
3 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 302— Sex Roles 

HDFS 330 — The Family in International Settings 
HDFS 335 — Latino Families and Children in the United 
States 

3-4 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 310 — Contemporary American Family 
HDFS 315 — Critical Transitions in Families 
HDFS 330 — The Family in International Settings 
HDFS 370— Family Conflict Management 

3 HDFS 316— Adolescent Development 

Family Studies Option 

Students in the family studies option focus on how families operate, 
develop, and change in response to the challenges of modern life. 
Course work covers the latest research and theories about dating, 
marriage, parenthood, divorce, life in single-parent and step-families, 
gender differences, and how families can learn to manage conflicts. 
Positions taken by graduates of this option include marriage and 
family counselor, human resource specialist, caseworker, and family 
services coordinator. 

HOURS PRESCRIBED COURSES 

3-4 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 203 — Infancy and Early Development 

HDFS 225— Middle Childhood 

HDFS 301 — Issues in Socialization and Development 

HDFS 316 — Adolescent Development 
3 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 215 — Courtship and Marriage 

HDFS 310 — Contemporary American Family 

HDFS 370 — Family Conflict Management 
3 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 302— Sex Roles 

HDFS 330 — The Family in International Settings 

HDFS 335 — Latino Families and Children in the United 
States 
3 HDFS 315 — Critical Transitions in Families 

3-6 Choose one of the following: 

HDFS 320 — Organization and Administration of Child 
Development Programs 

HDFS 350— Practicum in Human Development and Family 
Studies 

MAJOR IN AGRICULTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 
COMMUNICATIONS AND EDUCATION 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural and 
Environmental Communications and Education 

This curriculum prepares students for a wide variety of positions in 
agricultural and environmental sciences that require expertise in 
communications and education. Examples include professional writ- 
ing, editing, and publishing; public relations; advertising; broadcast- 



ing; teaching agriculture in the public schools; cooperative extension 
work; training and program development; and other education- and 
communication-related positions in agricultural and environmental 
agencies and businesses throughout the public and private sectors. 
Students completing the teacher certification option of this curricu- 
lum will be eligible for teacher certification in agriculture. For these 
students, a minimum of 2,000 hours of employment experience in 
agriculture is required for teacher certification. A minimum of 126 
hours is required for graduation. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education 
section. Students pursuing this major have four options: agricultural 
communications, agricultural leadership education, teacher certifica- 
tion, and environmental communications and education. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS 

4 

3 



HOURS 

3-4 

HOURS 
3-5 



3-5 

HOURS 

3-4 



3-5 
3-5 



COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

SPCOM 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking (see college 

Composition I requirement) 

COMPOSITION III 

Select from campus approved list. 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

Select one from: 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

MATH 124— Finite Mathematics 

MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists 

Approved introductory statistics course. See departmental 

list. 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

CHEM 100 — Introductory Chemistry for Agricultural 

Communications option only; CHEM 101 — General 

Chemistry and CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

for all other options. 

Physical science elective 1-2 

Approved biological science elective 1 



HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Humanities electives 3 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 

3 POL S 150 — American Government: Organization and Powers 

3-4 Elective in Social Sciences" 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

3 AGCOM 111 — Introduction to Agricultural and 

Environmental Communications 

3 AG ED 120 — Agricultural Education Programs and Principles 

3 Select one from: 

HDFS 105 — Introduction to Human Development 
HDFS 110 — Introduction to Family Ecology 
R SOC 110— Introduction to Rural Society 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 

and Environmental Sciences 

1. Teacher certification students must follow the Council on Teacher Education list of 
general education courses which is available from their adviser. 

2. For teacher certification and agricultural leadership education options, a physical 
or biological science elective is allowed. 

3. Teacher certification students must complete 15 hours in humanities, including a 
course in English and a course in American history. Teacher certification students 
must also complete two hours in health and/or physical development. 

4. For the teacher certification and agricultural leadership education options, ACE 
100 is required. 

Agricultural Communications Option 

The specializations in agricultural communications are designed for 
students who wish to pursue careers in the combined fields of agricul- 
ture and communications. They prepare students for work as profes- 
sionals in agricultural writing, editing, and publishing; public rela- 
tions; advertising; radio and television broadcasting; photography; 
and related activities. The College of ACES and the College of Com- 
munications offer this curriculum cooperatively. It allows the plan- 
ning of study programs closely related to the student's interests in 
news-editorial, advertising, or broadcast journalism. Completion of 
the major requires a minimum of 126 hours of credit. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



57 



HOURS 

4 
6-8 



4 

3 
1 

HOURS 
10 



OTHER PRESCRIBED 

ACE 100— Economics of Resources, Agriculture, and Food 

Select two from: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 
CPSC 121 — Principles of Field Crop Sciences 
FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 

Nutrition 
FSHN 120— Contemporary Nutrition 
NRES 101— Introductory Soils 
NRES 102— Introduction to Forestry 
NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 
TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 

AGCOM 114 — Writing for Agricultural and Environmental 

Media 

AGCOM 214 — Educational Campaign Planning 

AGCOM 273 — Presenting Environmental Information 

AGCOM 290— Professional Seminar 

ACES ELECTIVES 

Ten hours other than agricultural communications courses, 
including eight hours in 200 or 300 level courses. 



COMMUNICATION SPECIALIZATIONS 

Choose one of the following specializations: 

HOURS ADVERTISING 

20 ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 

ADV 381 — Advertising Research Methods 

ADV 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy and Tactics 

ADV 383 — Advertising Media Planning 

ADV 391 — Advertising Management: Planning 

ADV 392 — Advertising Management: Strategy and Tactics 

Electives to make up 20 hours. 

HOURS NEWS-EDITORIAL 

20 JOURN 150— Introduction to Journalism 

JOURN 350— Reporting, I 

JOURN 360— Graphic Arts 

JOURN 370— News Editing 

and at least one course from each of the following two 

groups: 

Group 1 

JOURN 217 — History of Communications 

JOURN 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 

JOURN 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 

JOURN 231 — Mass Communication in Democratic Society 

JOURN 241 — Law and Communications 

JOURN 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 

Group 2 

JOURN 326— Magazine Article Writing 

JOURN 330— Magazine Editing 

JOURN 372— Broadcast News Writing and Gathering 

JOURN 380— Reporting, II 

HOURS BROADCAST JOURNALISM 

20 JOURN 150— Introduction to Journalism 

JOURN 241 — Law and Communications 

JOURN 350— Reporting, I 

JOURN 362— Broadcast News Production 

JOURN 372— Broadcast News Writing and Gathering 

JOURN 382— Broadcast News Editing 



10-24 
126 



Open electives 
Total 1 



1. Of this total, ACES prescribed and elective courses must equal at least 35 hours. 

Agricultural Leadership Education Option 

The agricultural leadership education option prepares students for 
educational leadership, training, and outreach positions in agricul- 
tural, extension, community, and governmental agencies. Course 
work in the major focuses on designing educational /training pro- 
grams, making professional presentations, leadership development, 
teaching /training methods, and interpersonal communications. A 
four- week business /agency summer internship is required. The cur- 
riculum provides the flexibility for students to specialize in a chosen 
area of agriculture. A minimum of 126 semester hours is required for 
graduation. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

3 ACE 161 — Microcomputer Applications 

3 ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management 

6-8 Two courses from the following: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 
CPSC 121 — Principles of Field Crop Sciences 
FSHN 101 — Introduction to Food Science and Human 
Nutrition 



4-8 

3 

1 

4 

3 

3 

3 

12 

9-23 

126 



FSHN 120— Contemporary Nutrition 
NRES 101— Introductory Soils 
NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 
NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 
TSM 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 
AG ED 285 — Delivery and Evaluation of Agricultural 
Education Programs 

AG ED 290 — Internship in Agricultural Education 
AG ED 310 — Methods of Teaching Agriculture 
AG ED 315 — Agricultural Education Seminar 
AGCOM 214 — Educational Campaign Planning 
AGCOM 270 — Agricultural Sales Communications 
AGCOM 280— Leadership Development 
Educational psychology elective. See academic adviser. 
ACES electives 
Open electives 
Total required for graduation 1 



1. Of this total, ACES prescribed and elective courses must equal at least 35 hours. 

Teacher Certification Option 

The teacher certification option prepares students to teach agricul- 
ture/horticulture in Illinois high schools. Students may earn a dual 
major in agricultural and environmental communications and educa- 
tion (teacher certification option) and any other major in the College 
of ACES . State of Illinois certification requirements include a mini- 
mum of 2,000 hours of employment experience in agriculture. Dual 
certification in general science, biology, physical science, or other 
areas may be pursued. See your adviser for course requirements. 
Students must complete either the science and management or horti- 
culture specialization. A minimum of 126 hours is required for the 
degree. Teacher certification students must maintain a 2.5 GPA or 
above to remain in good standing. Review procedures are provided 
by the Council on Teacher Education. Applications for student teach- 
ing should be submitted early in the spring semester of the year 
preceding the student teacher practicum. 

HOURS AG ED PRESCRIBED 

2 AG ED 150 — Observation and Program Analysis in 
Agricultural Education 

1 AG ED 280 — Pre-Internship in Agricultural Education 

3 AG ED 285 — Delivery and Evaluation of Agricultural 
Education Programs 

3 AG ED 310 — Methods of Teaching Agriculture 

1 AG ED 315 — Agricultural Education Seminar 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

3 TSM elective 

4 Select one from: 

ANSCI 100 — Introduction to Animal Sciences 
CPSC 121 — Principles of Field Crop Sciences 
NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

3 EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

3 EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

3 SP ED 308 — Teaching Students with Learning and Behavioral 

Problems in the Regular Classroom 

8 ED PR 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 
3-4 U.S. History 1 

3 English 1 

2 Health/physical development 1 
6-18 Open electives 

OPTION SPECIALIZATIONS: 

Choose one of the following: 

HOURS SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION 

9 Agriculture and consumer economics, animal sciences, crop 
sciences, or natural resources and environmental science 
electives — work with your adviser. 



HOURS 

9 



126 



HORTICULTURE SPECIALIZATION 

Natural resources and environmental science electives. Work 

with your adviser. 

Total hours required for graduation 2 



1. From approved list of general education courses for teacher education curricula 
available from agricultural education adviser. 

2. At least 14 hours of the total prescribed and elective ACES courses must be at the 
200 level or above. 

Environmental Communications and Education Option 

The option in environmental communications and education is de- 
signed for students who wish to pursue careers in the combined fields 
of environment and communications/education. The option's pri- 
mary purpose is to prepare students to work in communication/ 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



S8 



education settings such as environmental organizations, businesses, 
and community and governmental agencies. Students work with 
advisors to design their own areas of specialization in communication 
or education. The program prepares students to work in a wide 
variety of organizational contexts, including volunteer development, 
member coordination, administrative support, program planning 
and deli verv, and information delivery . Completion of the curriculum 
requires a minimum of 126 hours of credit. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

4 ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture, and Food 

4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

3 NRES 102— Introduction to Forestry 

HOURS AGCOM AND AG ED PRESCRIBED 

1 AGCOM 114 — Writing for Agricultural and Environmental 

Media 

3 AGCOM 190— Student Publications and Media 

4 AGCOM 214 — Educational Campaign Planning 
AGCOM 273 — Presenting Environmental Information 

3 AGCOM 275 — Environmental Communications 

1 AGCOM 290— Professional Seminar 

3 AGCOM 348 — Communication, Environmental and Social 

Action 
3 AG ED 285 — Delivery and Evaluation of Agricultural 

Education Programs 

3 AG ED 310 — Methods of Teaching Agriculture 

HOURS AGCOM AND AG ED ELECTIVES 

7 See adviser for approved courses. 

HOURS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

9 See adviser for approved courses. 

HOURS ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES 

9 See adviser for approved courses. 

126 Total hours required for graduation 1 

1. Of this total, ACES prescribed and elective courses must total at least 35 hours. 

Department of Natural Resources and 
Environmental Sciences 

W-503 Turner Hall 

1102 South Goodwin Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-2770 

MAJOR IN NATURAL RESOURCES AND 
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Natural Resources and 
Environmental Sciences 

This curriculum prepares students for careers ranging from managing 
and protecting natural resources, to teaching and conducting research 
in the environmental sciences, to providing services related to envi- 
ronmental and natural resource management through business or 
government agencies. It also prepares students for graduate studies or 
for advanced professional training. Examples of careers for graduates 
include environmental consultants; educators; communicators; plant 
physiologists; researchers; social and environmental impact analysts; 
resource planners; naturalists; ecologists; biologists; environmental- 
ists; managers of wildlife, parks, forests and rangelands; conservation 
officers; nature center directors; aquatic ecologists; resource policy 
analysts; forest economists; watershed managers; soil conservation- 
ists; soil scientists; soil test analysts; land use specialists; plant and 
animal quarantine officers; lobbyists; plant nutrient consultants; and 
technical sales representatives. 

The major in natural resources and environmental sciences has 
three options: biological science, social science, and soil science. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 
College Composition I requirement) 

3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 



HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I or MATH 
134 — Calculus for Social Scientists, I 

3 Introductory statistics. See department for approved list. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

4 CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

4 CHEM 102— General Chemistry and CHEM 106— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 
4 Choose one of the following: 

GEOG 103— Earth's Physical Systems 

GEOL 101 — Introduction to Physical Geography 

GEOL 107— General Geology, I 
4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

9 To include: 

4 ACE 100 — Economics of Resources, Agriculture and 

Food or ECON 102 — Microeconomic principles 
3 POL S 150 — American Government: Organization 

and Powers 1 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

43-57 Option prescribed courses. See specific requirements for each 

option listed below. 
126 Total 2 

1. Not required for soils option. 

2. Additional elective courses must be completed to yield this total for graduation. 

Biological Science Option 

The option in biological science serves students with an interest in the 
fundamental properties and management of natural resource sys- 
tems, including interactions among plants, other soil biota, soil, water, 
wildlife, and humans. The emphasis is on the ecology, biology, and 
management of aquatic, soil, forest, and wildlife resources. The bio- 
logical science option provides depth in six areas: ecology, soils, 
physiology, animal biology, water or air resources, and resource 
measurements and modeling. 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

3 Choose one of the following: 

GEOG 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 

NRES 100— Earth Care 

NRES 102— Introduction to Forestry 

4 Choose one of the following: 

NRES 226— Dendrology 
PLBIO 260— Systematics of Flowering Plants 
4 Choose one of the following: 

EEE 212— Basic Ecology 
NRES 219 — Ecological Foundations for Ecosystem 

management 
8-9 Choose two of the following: 

BIOL 104— Animal Biology 
MCBIO 100 — Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 

101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 
PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 
3 Choose one of the following: 

ACE 210 — Economics of the Environment 
ACE/NRES 310— Intermediate Natural Resource 

Economics 
NRES 311 — Forest Resource Economics 
3-5 Choose one of the following: 

PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and 

Sound) 
PHYCS 140— Practical Physics: How Things Work— A 

Course for Nonscientists 
3-5 Choose one of the following: 

EEE 335 — Ornithology 
EEE 339— Field Vertebrate Natural History 
EEE 340— Natural History of the Vertebrates 
EEE 349— Conservation Biology 
NRES 290 — The Insects of Forest and Landscape Trees, 

Shrubs, and Flowers 
NRES 322— Fish and Wildlife Ecology 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



59 



3-5 Choose one of the following: 

EEE 343— Limnology 

CEE 241— Environmental Quality Engineering 

CEE 347— Stream Ecology 

ENVST 331 — Toxic Substances in the Environment 

TSM 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation 
3 Choose one of the following: 

ENVST 236 — Tomorrow's Environment 

EEE 105 — Environmental Biology 

NRES 222 — Contemporary Issues in Natural Resources 

NRES 266 — Environmental Botany 
3-5 Choose one of the following: 

NRES 315— Forest Soils 

NRES 318 — Tropical Forest Ecosystems 

NRES 371— Pedology 

NRES 375— Soil Microbiology 

NRES 387— Soil Chemistry 

PLBIO 381— Plant Ecology 

BIOL 339— Tropical Ecology 
3 Choose one of the following: 

NRES 316 — Advanced Forest Ecology 

NRES 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 
3-5 Choose one of the following: 

NRES 326— Tree Physiology 

PLBIO 304 — Evolutionary Survey of the Plant Kingdom 

PLBIO 330— Plant Physiology 

PLBIO 345 — Plant Anatomy 
3 Choose one of the following: 

GEOG 277 — Interpretation of Aerial Photographs 

GEOG 367 — Dynamic Simulation of Natural Resource 
Problems 

GEOG 368— Biological Modeling 

GEOG 377 — Introduction to Remote Sensing 

NRES 321 — Natural Resource Biometrics 

U P 318 — Fundamentals of Geographic Information 
Systems for Planners 

Social Science Option 

Students in the social science option study agricultural policies and 
programs, environmental sociology, land use planning, environmen- 
tal management, natural resource allocation, social impacts, and 
environmental law. This option is for students interested in human 
and societal dimensions of natural resource management and utiliza- 
tion. Students will concentrate on the economic, sociological, and 
psychological components of natural resource systems and study 
political and economic institutions that affect resource management 
and utilization. 



HOURS 

3 



8-9 



3 
3-5 



OTHER PRESCRIBED 

Choose one of the following: 

GEOG 214 — Conservation of Natural Resources 

NRES 100— Earth Care 

NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 
Choose one of the following: 

NRES 226— Dendrology 

PLBIO 260— Systematics of Flowering Plants 
Choose two of the following: 

BIOL 104— Animal Biology 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 
101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 
ACE 210 — Economics of the Environment 
Choose one of the following: 

PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and 
Sound) 

PHYCS 140— Practical Physics: How Things Work - A 
Course for Nonscientists 
Choose one of the following: 

ACE 303— Agricultural Law 

ACE 306 — Environmental Law 

U P 308 — Law and Planning Implementation 
Choose one of the following: 

ACE 356 — Agricultural and Food Policies and Programs 

ENVST 347— Environmental Sociology 

NRES 225 — Forest Land Policy and Administration 
Choose one of the following: 

NRES 310 — Natural Resource Economics 

NRES 311 — Forest Resource Economics 
Choose two of the following: 

NRES 321— Natural Resource Biometrics 

ENVST 344 — Social Impact Assessment 

GEOG 367 — Dynamic Simulation of Natural Resource 
Problems 

GEOG 368 — Biological Modeling 



U P 318 — Fundamentals of Geographic Information 

Systems for Planners 
SOC 386— Social Statistics II 
CPSC 340— Applied Statistical Methods 
6-8 Choose two of the following: 

NRES 325 — Forest Resource Management 

LEIST 340 — Outdoor Recreation Management 

LA 341 — Land Resource Evaluation 

U P 305 — Environmental Planning in a Watershed Context 

U P 348 — Environmental Planning Workshop 

U P 375 — Regional Environmental Management 

Simulation 

So/7 Science Option 

Students with an interest in soil conservation, soil and water interac- 
tions with plants and other organisms, water quality, land use assess- 
ment, soil and plant nutrient analysis, and fertilizer studies would 
choose the soil science option. The soil science option gives students 
a strong background in the physical environment including the areas 
of soil formation, classification, the role of soils in plant growth, soil 
management and conservation, soil microbiology and ecology, soil 
and water chemistry, water quality, managed and unmanaged soil 
systems, and factors that affect the behavior and movement of pollut- 
ants in and through soils. 

HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
2 
5 

4 
4 
1 
3 
18 



6-7 



40 



OTHER PRESCRIBED 

CHEM 122 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis 

CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry 

MCBIO 100 — Introductory Microbiology 

MCBIO 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 

PHYCS 101— General Physics or PHYCS 111— General 

Physics 

PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

CPSC 121— Principles of Field Crop Science 

CPSC 290 — Undergraduate Agronomy Seminar 

CPSC 330— Plant Physiology 

Select 18 hours from: 

NRES 279— Soil Ecology 

NRES 368— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 

NRES 371— Pedology 

NRES 372— Soil Testing Practicum 

NRES 374 — Soil Conservation and Management 

NRES 375— Soil Microbiology 

NRES 376— Field Pedology 

NRES 381 — Laboratory Methods for Soils Research 

NRES 383— Soil Mineralogy 

NRES 387— Soil Chemistry 

NRES 388— The Physics of the Plant Environment 
Select two courses from: 

CPSC 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 

CPSC 226— Weeds and Their Control 

CPSC 318— Crop Growth and Production 

CPSC 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 

CPSC 322— Forage Crops and Pastures 
Total 1 



1. ACES prescribed and elective courses must total a minimum of 40 hours. 

MAJOR IN FORESTRY 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

The major in forestry prepares students for careers in the management 
of private and public forest properties for the production and manu- 
facture of valuable wood products and for the protection of water- 
shed, wildlife habitat, recreational enjoyment, and other benefits. 
Graduates may qualify for employment in a wide range of fields with 
public agencies or private industry including positions as forest 
managers, forest economists, silviculturists, forest conservationists, 
timber appraisers, watershed and wildlife managers, wood products 
specialists, forest rangers, and urban foresters. A minimum of 130 
hours of credit is needed for graduation, including eight hours of 
credit earned in summer field studies. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 Select from campus approved list. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



60 



HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 1 

5 MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I or MATH 
134 — Calculus for Social Scientists I 

Introductory statistics. See department for approved list. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

4 CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 
4 CHEM 102— General' Chemistry and CHEM 106— General 

Chemistry Laboratory 
4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

9 To include one of the following: 

3 ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles (required in 

the Urban Forestry option) 
3 ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

HOURS ACES PRESCRIBED 

2 ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 

and Environmental Sciences 

HOURS OTHER PRESCRIBED 

4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

130 Total 2 



1. Urban Forestry option requires MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I or 
MATH 135— Calculus. 

2. Additional courses from options below and from electives must be completed to 
yield this total for graduation. 

Forest Science Option 

The forest science option prepares students for all phases of the 
management of natural resources, particularly those associated with 
forests and forest land, including attention to environmental quality 
and ecology. The forest science option focuses on the management of 
natural resources for the production of wood products, the protection 
of watersheds, the preservation of wildlife habitats, and the promo- 
tion of recreational enjoyment. This program is accredited by the 
Society of American Foresters. 

HOURS 

4 
5 
3 



HOURS 

3 
2-4 



3-5 



OTHER PRESCRIBED 

BIOL 104 — Animal biology 

GEOL 101 — Introduction to Physical Geography 

NRES 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology or PL PA 

204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 

2 NRES 211— Forest Ecology (Summer Field Studies) 

1 NRES 212— Wildlife Recreation (Summer Field Studies) 

3 NRES 213— Silviculture 

2 NRES 215 — Introduction to Forest Resource Management 
(Summer Field Studies) 

2 NRES 221 — Forest Measurements (Summer Field Studies) 

4 NRES 226— Dendrology 

1 NRES 231— Wood Utilization, I (Summer Field Studies) 

3 NRES 232— Anatomy and Wood Utilization or NRES 236— 
Physical Properties of Wood and Wood-Based Materials 

3 NRES 277 — Interpretation of Aerial Photographs 

4 NRES 311 — Forest Resource Economics 
3 NRES 316 — Advanced Forest Ecology 

3 NRES 321— Natural Resource Biometrics 

4 NRES 325 — Forest Resource Management 

5 Choose a minimum of five hours in conjunction with your 
adviser 

3-5 PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and Sound) 

or PHYCS 140— Practical Physics: How Things Work— A 
Course for Nonscientists 

Urban Forestry Option 

The urban forestry option prepares students for positions involving 
management of forest resources in primarily urban areas and includes 
such diverse fields as ecology, landscape design, landscape horticul- 
ture, city and regional planing, entomology, and plant pathology. 
Graduates may qualify for employment in a wide range of fields with 
public agencies or private industry including positions as forest 
managers, forest economists, silviculturists, forest conservationists, 
timber appraisers, watershed and wildlife managers, forest rangers, 
urban foresters, and wood products specialists. 



3 
4 

3-4 
3-5 

3-4 



3-4 



3-4 



4 

3-4 
3 
3 



OTHER PRESCRIBED 

CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

Select one course from: 

ENTOM 319 — Fundamentals of Insect Pest Management 

ENTOM 321— Biological Control of Insect Pests 

PL PA 325 — Diseases of Ornamentals and Turfgrasses 

Select one course from: 

BIOL 104— Animal Biology 

PLBIO 234 — Form and Function in Flowering Plants 

PLBIO 260— Systematics of Flowering Plants 

PLBIO 366— Field Botany 

Select one course from: 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 

ACCY 201 — Accounting and Accountancy, I 

B ADM 210 — Management and Organization Behavior 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management 

Select one course from: 

U P 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions 
LEIST 340 — Outdoor Recreation Management 

ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 

and Environmental Sciences 

NRES 102— Introduction to Forestry or NRES 103— 

Introduction to Horticulture 

NRES 213— Silviculture 

NRES 230— Urban Forestry 

NRES 315— Forest Soils or NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 

NRES 316— Advanced Forest Ecology or NRES 319— 

Environment and Plant Ecosystems 

Select one course from: 

NRES 220— Plant and Animal Genetics or NRES 313— 
Forest Genetics and Tree Improvement 

Select one course from: 

NRES 326— Tree Physiology 
NRES 343— Floriculture Physiology 
PLBIO 330— Plant Physiology 

NRES 253 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, I or NRES 226— Dendrology 

NRES 254 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, II 

NRES 255 — Home Grounds Planning and Design 

NRES 258— Arboriculture 

NRES 259— Landscape Plants Production 

PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 



MAJOR IN HORTICULTURE 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Horticulture 

Opportunities open to graduates include the production of horticul- 
tural crops in greenhouses, nurseries, and farms; residential land- 
scape design and construction; park and golf course management; 
landscape maintenance; urban forestry; arboriculture; flower shop 
management and floral design; and plant breeding. Graduates may 
also work as horticultural mass media specialists, or as sales represen- 
tatives and technicians with seed and plant suppliers, chemical indus- 
tries, and horticultural supply firms. Others find employment with 
state or federal governmental agencies or institutions as teachers, 
researchers, horticultural advisors, crop inspectors, and consultants. 
The program also prepares students for graduate studies. 

Students pursuing this major have three options: production and 
management, horticultural science, and urban forestry. 

PRESCRIBED COURSES INCLUDING CAMPUS GENERAL EDUCATION 

HOURS COMPOSITION I AND SPEECH 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition or equivalent (see 

college Composition I requirement) 
3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

HOURS COMPOSITION II 

3 See campus approved list. 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

3-5 See option choice for quantitative reasoning requirement. 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

4 CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 

HOURS HUMANITIES 

6 Select from campus approved list. 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

9 From at least two departments to include one of the 

following: 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL, CONSUMER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 



61 



HOURS 

6 

HOURS 

2 

HOURS 

3 
4 
3 
55-69 

130 



ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles (see options below) 

CULTURAL STUDIES 

Select one course from Western culture and one from non- 

Western/U.S. minority culture from campus approved list. 

ACES PRESCRIBED 

ACES 100 — Contemporary Issues in Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences 

OTHER PRESCRIBED 

CPSC 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 

NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

PL PA 204— Introductory Plant Pathology 

Option prescribed courses. See specific requirements for each 

option listed below. 

Total 1 



FLORICULTURE AND GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION 



1. Additional elective courses must be completed to yield this total for graduation. 

Production and Management Option 

This option prepares students for careers in the production, market- 
ing, management, and use of horticultural flowers, landscape, and 
food crops; in teaching and /or research; or in businesses providing 
services related to horticultural crops. Students can specialize in 
landscape, nursery and turf; floriculture crops and greenhouse man- 
agement; or in food crops. Students must select one of three specializa- 
tions within this option. 



HOURS 

3-5 



3 
4-5 



3 
4 
3 
3 

3-4 



12 



OTHER PRESCRIBED COURSES 

One math course selected from: 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

MATH 124— Finite Mathematics 

MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists, I 

MATH 135— Calculus 
One business/management course selected from: 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 

ACCY 201 — Principles of Accounting, I 

B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management 
CHEM 102— General Chemistry and CHEM 106— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 
One plant biology course selected from: 

PLBIO 260— Systematics of Flowering Plants 

PLBIO 366— Field Botany 
NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 
NRES 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 
NRES 240— Plant Propagation 

NRES 253 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 
Plants, I 
One plant physiology course selected from: 

NRES 326— Tree Physiology 

NRES 343— Floricultural Physiology 

NRES 365 — Growth and Development of Horticultural 
Crops 

PLBIO 330— Plant Physiology 
Specialization supplement courses, chosen in conjunction 
with an adviser. 1 



1. At least two of these courses must be at the 300 level. 
LANDSCAPE, NURSERY AND TURF SPECIALIZATION 



3 
9-12 



NRES 254 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, II 

NRES 258— Arboriculture 

Choose three of the following courses 1 : 

NRES 243— Bedding Plant Production, Use and 
Identification 

NRES 244 — Herbaceous Perennials: Identification and Use 

NRES 252— Turfgrass Management 

NRES 255 — Home Grounds Planning and Design 

NRES 256 — Home Grounds Development and 
Construction 

NRES 257— Landscape Contracting 

NRES 259— Landscape Plants Production 

NRES 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

NRES 336 — Perennial Grass Ecosystems 

NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 

NRES 347— Horticultural Plant Breeding 

NRES 367 — Postharvest Physiology of Horticultural Crops 



4 
3 
9-12 



NRES 241 — Greenhouse Management 
NRES 341 — Floriculture Crops Production 
Choose three of the following courses 1 : 

NRES 243— Bedding Plant Production, Use and 
Identification 

NRES 244 — Herbaceous Perennials: Identification and Use 

NRES 245 — Indoor Plant Culture, Use and Identification 

NRES 246— Floral Design, I 

NRES 247 — Flower Show Management and Floral Design, 
II 

NRES 259— Landscape Plants Production 

NRES 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

NRES 336 — Perennial Grass Ecosystems 

NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 

NRES 347— Horticultural Plant Breeding 

NRES 367— Postharvest Physiology of Horticultural Crops 



1. At least one course must be at the 300 level. 



1 . At least one course must be at the 300 level. 
FOOD CROPS SPECIALIZATION 

3 NRES 261 — Small Fruit and Viticulture Science 

3 NRES 262— Tree Fruit Science 

4 NRES 264 — Commercial Vegetable Production 

5 Choose two of the following courses: 

NRES 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 

NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 

NRES 347— Horticultural Plant Breeding 

NRES 364— International Food Crops 

NRES 367— Postharvest Physiology of Horticultural Crops 

Horticultural Science Option 

Students in the horticultural science option study horticulture with a 
strong emphasis on the physical and biological sciences. This option 
is for students preparing for additional graduate studies or for those 
who want a strong science background along with a broad prepara- 
tion in horticulture. ' 

8 Choose from: 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I and 
MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II or 
MATH 135— Calculus and MATH 245— Calculus, II 

4 CHEM 102— General Chemistry and CHEM 106— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

3 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

5 Choose from: 

MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology and MCBIO 
101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology or 

PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat and 
Sound) 

3 NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 

4 NRES 220— Plant and Animal Genetics 
3 NRES 240— Plant Propagation 

3 NRES 300— Special Problems 

3-4 Plant Physiology course. Select one from: 

NRES 326— Tree Physiology 
NRES 343— Floricultural Physiology 
NRES 365 — Growth and Development of Horticultural 

Crops 
PLBIO 330— Plant Physiology 
12-16 Choose four of the following courses (at least two courses 

must be at the 300 level): 

NRES 241 — Greenhouse Management 

NRES 243— Bedding Plant Production, Use and 

Identification 
NRES 244 — Herbaceous Perennials: Identification and Use 
NRES 245— Indoor Plant Culture, Use and Identification 
NRES 252 — -Turfgrass Management 
NRES 253— Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, I 
NRES 254 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, II 
NRES 258— Arboriculture 
NRES 259 — Landscape Plants Production 
NRES 261— Small Fruit and Viticulture Science 
NRES 262— Tree Fruit Science 
NRES 264 — Commercial Vegetable Production 
NRES 323— Principles of Plant Breeding 
NRES 333— Plant Physiology Laboratory 
NRES 336— Perennial Grass Ecosystems 
NRES 341 — Floriculture Crops Production 
NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 
NRES 347— Horticultural Plant Breeding 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



62 



12 



NRES 364 — International Food Crops 

NRES 367 — Postharvest Physiology of Horticultural Crops 
Elective science courses. At least two of these courses must be 
at the 300 level. See academic adviser. 



Urban Forestry Option 

Students in the urban forestry option integrate course work from 
horticulture and forestry to focus on the management of plants in 
urban forests, parks, and other public areas. The urban forestry option 
serves students with career interests in urban forestry and horticul- 
ture and those desiring interdisciplinary preparation in horticulture 
and forestry. 
5 Select one course from: 

MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 
MATH 135— Calculus 
3-4 One course in statistics. See College of ACES Handbook. 

3 ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 

3 Select one course from: 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 

ACCY 201 — Principles of Accounting, I 

B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

ACE 231 — Food and Agribusiness Management 

3 Select one course from: 

U P 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions 
LEIST 340 — Outdoor Recreation Management 

4 CHEM 102— General Chemistry and CHEM 106— General 
Chemistry Laboratory 

2-4 Select one course from: 

ENTOM 319 — Fundamentals of Insect Pest Management 

ENTOM 321— Biological Control of Insect Pests 

PL PA 325 — Diseases of Ornamentals and Turfgrasses 
3-5 Select one course from: 

PLBIO 234 — Form and Function in Flowering Plants 

PLBIO 260 — Systematics of Flowering Plants 

PLBIO 366— Field Botany 

BIOL 104— Animal Biology 
3 Select one course from: 

NRES 102 — Introduction to Forestry 

NRES 103— Introduction to Horticulture 
3 NRES 213— Silviculture 

3 NRES 230— Urban Forestry 

3-4 Select one course from: 

NRES 315— Forest Soils 

NRES 342— Plant Nutrition 
3 Select one course from: 

NRES 316 — Advanced Forest Ecology 

NRES 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 
3-4 Select one course from: 

NRES 326— Tree Physiology 

NRES 343— Floricultural Physiology 

PLBIO 330— Plant Physiology 
3-4 Select one course from: 

NRES 226— Dendrology 

NRES 253 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 
Plants, I 
3 NRES 254 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental 

Plants, II 
3 NRES 255 — Home Grounds Planning and Design 

3-4 Select one course from: 

NRES 220 — Plant and Animal Genetics 

NRES 313 — Forest Genetics and Tree Improvement 
3 NRES 258— Arboriculture 

3 NRES 259— Landscape Plants Production 



College of Applied Life Studies 



107 Huff Hall 

1206 South Fourth Street 

Champaign, IL 61820 

(217) 333-2131 

Fax: (217) 333-0404 

The College of Applied Life Studies prepares its graduates for scien- 
tific and professional careers in fields associated with the promotion 
of human health and well-being. 

Four academic departments offer the bachelor of science, master of 
science of arts, and doctor of philosophy degrees in the areas of study 
outlined below. In addition to career opportunities in such fields as 
health and /or recreation planning and administration, sports medi- 
cine, commercial recreation, community health education, speech- 



language pathology, audiology, corporate physical fitness, and tour- 
ism management, certain programs may serve as a first step toward 
careers in medicine, business, and journalism, among others. An 
interdisciplinary minor in gerontology is also available (see descrip- 
tion under community health below). 

The Division of Rehabilitation-Education offers a master of science 
degree for those students seeking advanced study with emphasis in 
areas of administration, counseling, and general rehabilitation. It also 
provides students who have physical or sensory impairments and 
learning disabilities with many support services, including orienta- 
tion, mobility, and reader services for students who require them, as 
well as physical therapy, wheelchair sports, and other programs. 
These programs are designed to help them develop skills necessary as 
independent and productive members of society. For further informa- 
tion, contact the Division of Rehabilitation-Education, 105 Rehab 
Center, 1207 S. Oak Street, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-4600. 

A distinguished faculty has kept the academic departments and 
the division at or near the top of all recent national rankings. The 
college will continue to provide exciting educational opportunities in 
research, teaching, and service leading to a wide range of career 
options. 

Departments and Curricula 

The bachelor of science degree is offered by four academic depart- 
ments: Community Health, Kinesiology, Leisure Studies, and Speech 
and Hearing Science. 

— The average class size is 27 students. 

— Advising services are available to assist with career information 
and the development of appropriate courses of study. 

— Honors programs are available for outstanding students at the 
campus level. 

— Practicum experiences are required within most departmental 
curricula. Quality placements are available throughout the United 
States and around the world in specific degree programs. 

— Study abroad programs are available around the world. 

— Students have access to the nation's third largest academic library, 
including an excellent college library, reference service, interli- 
brary loan system, and term-paper counseling system. 

COMMUNITY HEALTH 

Health Education. The health educator's role is to be instrumental in 
the process of informing, motivating, and assisting people to adopt 
and maintain healthful practices, lifestyles, and decision-making skills. 
The undergraduate student develops a knowledge of the relationship 
between community health and education interventions. In general, 
students in health education are interested in direct helping relation- 
ships. It prepares the undergraduate for careers in health promotion 
on local, state, and federal levels, as well as in voluntary health 
agencies, private health clinics, and hospitals. 

Health Planning and Administration. The undergraduate program 
is directed toward developing the student's understanding of factors 
which affect the health of people and the health care delivery process 
in the United States. In general, students in health planning and 
administration have a more focused interest in the business aspects of 
an organization that involve operations management, planning, and 
decision-making. It prepares the undergraduate for entry-level posi- 
tions in the planning and administration of health programs in health 
care facilities and related government agencies and businesses. 

Gerontology. A minor in gerontology is offered for those students 
with a special interest in the aging population and its concomitant 
issues. Requirements can be completed with few additional courses or 
through electives. 

KINESIOLOGY 

Kinesiology is the study of human movement in a range of physical 
activities including athletics, communication, dance, exercise, play, 
rehabilitation, sports, and work. Kinesiology programs focus on the 
study of humans as physically active organisms, with special refer- 
ence to human performance and the development of motor skills 
together with the impact that physical activity has on individuals 
throughout their lives. 

Undergraduate kinesiology programs prepare students for ca- 
reers in such diverse fields as teaching, sales, coaching, fitness and 



COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 



63 



wellness, and athletic training. Many students use their undergradu- 
ate training to continue their education at graduate or professional 
schools in physical therapy, medicine, occupational therapy, 
biobehavioral health, law, biomechanics, exercise physiology, sport 
and exercise psychology, motor control, and other related disciplines. 
The department offers programs that may lead to Illinois state 
certification to teach physical education in grades kindergarten through 
twelve, and six through twelve. It offers a teacher education minor in 
physical education, an athletic training emphasis (NATA approved), 
and a sport coaching endorsement. 

LEISURE STUDIES 

As one of the top three industries in almost every state, the leisure 
industry currently generates more than $400 billion nationwide. 
Under the umbrella of the leisure profession are vocations which 
include tourism, sports, special events, facility, park and natural 
resource management, and recreation business. Recent graduates in 
leisure studies are professionally prepared as administrators and 
programmers in a host of leisure service agencies. 

The undergraduate curriculum in Leisure Studies prepares stu- 
dents to design, manage, and deliver leisure services to a variety of 
populations in diverse agency settings and provides a firm foundation 
from which students may pursue graduate studies. A broad general 
education is emphasized and complemented with a core of profes- 
sional courses. Beyond a strong core integrating management, leisure 
theory, and research, the program allows students to focus their 
studies, via correlate areas, on a major market segment within the 
leisure and recreation field. These areas of emphasis include: 

Recreation Management 

Tourism Management 

Park and Natural Resource Management 

Sports Management 

SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

The study of speech-language pathology and audiology prepares 
students for entrance into professional training at the graduate level. 
Career opportunities include direct services to individuals with dis- 
abilities, as well as positions in business, research laboratories, gov- 
ernment agencies, and university settings. 

Requirements 



ADMISSION 






College Preparatory Subjects 


Semesters 


of Course Work 




REQUIRED 


RECOMMENDED 


English 
Algebra 
Geometry 
Trigonometry 
Advanced math 


8 
4 
2 


8 
4 
2 
1 
3 


One foreign language* 

Laboratory science** 

(not general science) 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Social studies 


4 
4 

4 


8 

2 
2 
2 
4 


Flexible additional courses 






from the areas above 


4 




Total college preparatory 


30 





* At least 6 semesters of the same foreign language should be taken. 

"Beginning freshmen will be at a disadvantage if they have not completed at least one 

year each of high school biology and high school chemistry. 

Once high school course work requirements are fulfilled, qualifi- 
cations for admission are primarily determined by a combination of 
class rank at the end of the junior year with the highest ACT or SAT test 
score on file at the time of the admission decision. These two factors are 
used to predict an applicant's likelihood of academic success and one 
may help to offset the other. For example, an applicant may compen- 
sate for a low test score with a high class rank. 

Transfer applicants must have attained junior standing (60 semes- 
ter hours of transferable credit) by the desired date of entry. Lower- 
division transfer students (less than 60 semester hours) must petition 
for admission. Admission is competitive, based upon cumulative 



grade point average. The minimum transfer GPA requirement for the 
college is 2.75 (A = 4.0). 

Special Programs 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Graduation from the College of Applied Life Studies with any honors 
designation requires that a student must have attained at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign a specific minimum cumulative 
grade point average based on a minimum of 55 semester hours in 
residence. 

Bronze Tablet (see Graduation with Honors section) 
Dean's List (see Graduation with Honors section) 
Highest Honors— 3.75 to 4.0 
High Honors— 3.5 to 3.74 
Honors— 3.25 to 3.49 

Curricula 



CURRICULUM IN COMMUNITY HEALTH 

The Department of Community Health at the University of Illinois 
offers two programs at the undergraduate level which prepare stu- 
dents to participate in the changing world of health care and health 
behavior: Health Education and Health Planning and Administra- 
tion. Both curricula are built on a foundation of general education 
courses which emphasizes communication skills and critical thinking. 
The Professional Core courses are designed to help students develop 
skills in planning, implementation, and evaluation in the context of 
health services and programs. 

Students must complete an internship during their senior year in 
a setting related to the degree and their interests. Recent internship 
sites have included the American Heart Association, the American 
Red Cross, hospitals, nursing homes, fitness centers, work site health 
education programs, and substance abuse prevention centers. 

Current information can be found at www.als.uiuc.edu/chlth or 
you may e-mail the Community Health Department at chlth- 
help@als.uiuc.edu with any questions. 

REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

The Faculty Senate, the General Education Board, and the colleges and 
departments are working to implement enhanced general education 
requirements. Additional changes are expected to be implemented 
over the next several years. Thus, new students should confirm their 
general education requirements by consulting college and depart- 
mental offices, handbooks, or advisers. The Department of Commu- 
nity Health also requires that certain courses from the approved lists 
be taken as noted below. The prescribed courses prepare the student 
for upper division study and may be used to satisfy General Education 
requirements provided they are on the appropriate General Educa- 
tion List. 



HOURS 

6-7 



HOURS 

3 
3 



HOURS 

3 



HOURS 

3 



COMMUNICATION ARTS 

RHET 105 or RHET 108 and an approved speech performance 

course; or SPCOM 111 and 112 

COMPOSITION II (CHLTH 204 fulfills requirement) 

HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS 

At least one course from literature and the arts approved list 
At least one course from historical and philosophical 
perspectives approved list 
Additional course from either list 

QUANTITATIVE REASONING 

Departmentally approved course in statistics. Choose one of 
the following: 

EDPSY 290— Elements of Statistics, EDPSY 390— Elements 

of Educational Statistics 
SOC 385— Social Statistics, I, ECON 172 and 173, VP 391— 
Biostatistics, PSYCH 235 
One elective from approved campus list 

NATURAL SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

Departmentally approved course in Environmental Health, 

BIOL 100, BIOL 101, BIOL 105, EEE 105, GEOL 143, PL BIO 

110, PL PA 100 

PHYSL 103— Human Physiology 

An approved course in physical sciences 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



64 



HOURS SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

At least one course in Behavioral Sciences from approved list 
3 At least one course selected from: 

ANTH 103— Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 
ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles or ECON 103 — 

Macroeconomic Principles 
POL S 150 — American Government: Organization and 

Power 
SOC 100 — Introduction to Sociology 
3 Additional course from either list 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 1 

3 At least one course from western cultures list 

3 At least one course from U.S. minority cultures or non- 

western cultures list 



1. Courses in cultural studies may be completed through other categories where 
appropriate. 



HOURS PROFESSIONAL CORE REQUIREMENTS 

3 CHLTH 100 — Contemporary Health 

3 CHLTH 101— Introduction to Public Health 
CHLTH 111— Professional Seminar 

4 CHLTH 204 — Foundations of Health Behavior 

3 CHLTH 210 — Community Health Organizations 

3 CHLTH 250— Health Care Systems 

2 CHLTH 274 — Introduction to Epidemiology 

4 CHLTH 310— Public Health Practice 

3 CHLTH 321— Health Data Analysis 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

An area of concentration will be determined by the junior year. Areas 
of concentration are health education, and health planning and ad- 
ministration. Specific requirements for each option are described in 
the following sections. 

HOURS HEALTH EDUCATION 

3 FSHN 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 

2 CHLTH 143— Drug Use and Abuse 

2 CHLTH 200— Mental Health 

2 CHLTH 206— Human Sexuality 

CHLTH 280 — Orientation to Internship 

8 CHLTH 285 — Internship in Community Health 

HOURS HEALTH PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

CHLTH 280— Orientation to Internship 

8 CHLTH 285 — Internship in Community Health 

3 CHLTH 355— Health Services Financing 
3 CHLTH 357— Health Planning 

3 CHLTH 358 — Health Administration 

CORRELATE AREAS 

Each student completes a correlate area that is a planned program of 
courses taken primarily outside the department, designed to be sup- 
portive of the area of concentration. 

HOURS HEALTH EDUCATION 

18 Select minimum number of courses indicated from the 

departmentally approved list in each of the following 
categories to total six courses: communications, health care 
delivery, organization and leadership, and community 
problems. 

HOURS HEALTH PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION 

18 Select minimum number of courses indicated from the 

departmentally approved list in each of the following 
categories to total six courses: administration and 
organization, planning, accounting and economics, and 
marketing and communications. 



SUMMARY OF DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 



HOURS 

50 

25 
17 
18 

128 



REQUIREMENTS 

General education requirements and department required 

courses 

Professional core 

Area of concentration 

Correlate 1 or 2 

Electives to total hours required for graduation 

Total minimum required for graduation 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

A minimum of 18 hours in gerontology, distributed as follows, is 
required .Atleastsixof the total of 1 8 hours must be taken from outside 
the student's own department. See academic adviser for further 
explanation of correlate requirements. 

HOURS COURSES 

3-7 Choose one of the following options: 

3 BIOL 108— Biology of Human Aging 

4 CSB 234— Functional Human Anatomy and PHYSL 
103 — Human Physiology 1 

7 PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 

and KINES 359 — Physical Activity and Aging as a 
substitute for BIOL 108 2 

3 HDFS/CHLTH/LEIST/PSYCH/REHAB 214— 

Introduction to Aging or equivalent 
6 Two courses from: 

3 HDFS 304— Gerontology 

3 KINES 359— Physical Activity and Aging 

3 LEIST 231— Leisure and Aging 

3 SOC W 315— Social Work Services for the Aged 

3 SOC 348— Sociology of Aging 

The total may be achieved through electives in gerontology which 
may include up to three hours of internship or independent study. 



1. Only four of the nine hours for these two courses are credited to the minor. 

2. Students electing this option will receive credit for both courses toward the total of 
18 hours. 

CURRICULUM IN KINESIOLOGY 

The kinesiology curriculum leads to a bachelor of science degree that 
will prepare students for careers in human movement-related fields 
and/or advanced professional or graduate study. The undergraduate 
program provides the student with a broad general education, a 
departmental core integral to the understanding of the diverse aspects 
of human movement, and a correlate area of courses specific to the 
student's area of concentration within kinesiology. 

Students who desire certification as a teacher or athletic trainer can 
satisfy the necessary subject matter requirements by appropriate 
selection of courses within the several categories of the curriculum. 
Students seeking such certification should ask the undergraduate 
academic adviser about admission criteria for the NATA-approved 
program or the teaching program in physical education and about 
certification requirements. For teacher certification requirements ap- 
plicable to all curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education section. 
The Department of Kinesiology also offers a coaching endorsement to 
all University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students, regardless of 
degree program. 

Further information on careers in kinesiology is available from the 
Academic Affairs Office, Department of Kinesiology, University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 113 Freer Hall, 906 South Goodwin 
Avenue, Urbana, IL, 61801, (217) 333-1083. 

REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

Students pursuing teacher certification in physical education must 
complete general education requirements with courses chosen from 
the Council on Teacher Education-approved list. Consult the under- 
graduate academic adviser for specifics. The Department of Kinesiol- 
ogy also requires that certain courses from the approved lists be taken 
as noted below. The prescribed courses prepare the student for upper 
division study and may be used to satisfy General Education require- 
ments provided they are on the appropriate General Education List. 

HOURS COMPOSITION I & II 

6-7 Rhet 105 or 108; and a speech performance course 

or 

6 SPCOM 111 and 112 

7 KINES 240 — Social and Psychological Aspects of Physical 
Activity 

HOURS QUANTITATIVE REASONING I 

3 At least one course from the approved departmental list 

HOURS HUMANITIES AND ARTS 

6 At least two courses with different rubrics from the approved 

University general education list 



COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 

65 



HOURS BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

3 At least one course from the approved University general 
education list 

4 KINES 262 — Motor Development, Growth, and Form 

HOURS NATURAL SCIENCES 

5 PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 

3-4 At least one course in physical sciences from the approved 

University general education list 

HOURS CULTURAL STUDIES 

6 Two cultural studies courses, one non-western/U.S. minority 
and one western from the University general education list 

Supporting Work Required Courses 

HOURS MATHEMATICS 

4 At least one course from the approved departmental list 

COMPUTER SKILLS 

At least one course from the approved departmental list 

HOURS ANATOMY 

4 CSB 234 — Functional Human Anatomy 

3+ At least one course from the approved University general 

education or departmental lists 
48 Total minimum hours 



HOURS 

3 



• Students pursuing teacher certification must complete American history, literature, 
and three additional humanities courses from the Council-approved list. 

• Students pursuing certification will need to select a non-western cultures course 
from the Council-approved list. 

• Students pursuing certification must complete POL S 150, PSYCH 100 or PSYCH 
103, and one additional social science course from the Council-approved list. 

HOURS KINESIOLOGY CORE REQUIREMENTS 

KINES 125 — Introduction to Kinesiology 

1 KINES 130 — Fundamental Analysis and Performance of Basic 
Movement Skills 

3 KINES 140— Social Scientific Bases of Sport 

3 KINES 150 — Bioscientific Foundations of Human Movement 

3 KINES 240 — Social Psychological Aspects of Physical Activity 

3 KINES 252 — Bioenergetics of Human Movement 

3 KINES 255 — Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement 

3 KINES 257— Coordination, Control, and Skill 

3 KINES 262— Motor Development, Growth, and Form 

2-5 At least two 1-hour courses from the movement skills series 

(KINES 131-136) 

24-27 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVE KINESIOLOGY COURSES 

at least 

18 One course in each of the three areas (biodynamics; 

coordination, control and skill; social science of physical 
activity) at the 200 or 300 level and a minimum of two 
additional courses at the 200 or 300 level. At least three 
elective courses (9 or more hours) must be at the 300 level. 

HOURS CORRELATE AREA STUDIES 

at least 

18 Students select a standardized correlate that will prepare 

them for further education or their career goals. 
14 Free electives 

128 Total hours for the degree 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

In addition to the general education requirements for all kinesiology 
undergraduates, the teacher certification requirements for students in 
all curricula, and the kinesiology core requirements on the previous 
pages, students pursuing certification to teach physical education (K- 
12 and/or 6-12) must include the following courses in the elective 
kinesiology, correlate area studies, and free electives areas:* 

HOURS 

3 

3 

3 

2-3 

3 

3 

3 

8 



3-4 



REQUIRED "ELECTIVES" AND CORRELATE AREA STUDIES 

KINES 263 — Physical Education Curriculum 

KINES 267— Adapted Physical Education 

KINES 273 — Instructional Strategies in Physical Education 

KINES 286 — Supervised Experience in the Common School 

KINES 301 — Observation and Evaluation in Kinesiology 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

ED PR 238— Educational Practice for Special Fields in 

Elementary Schools 

ED PR 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 

KINES 131-136 not chosen in the core. Teacher certification 

students need a total of 5 courses from this sequence. (See the 

undergraduate academic adviser.) 



'Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach subjects along 
with physical education in grades 6 through 8. Consult the certification officer at 110 
Education Building for additional information. 

CURRICULUM IN LEISURE STUDIES' 

The Department of Leisure Studies originated at the University of 
Illinois in 1940. Today, this program continues to rank nationally 
among the top three in the field, and takes pride in producing a large 
number of exceptional professionals in the field. The Department of 
Leisure Studies offers a bachelor of science degree in four areas of 
concentration: recreation management, park and natural resource 
management, sports management, and tourism management. The 
curriculum prepares students to design, manage, and deliver leisure 
services to a variety of populations in diverse settings and provides a 
firm foundation from which students may pursue graduate studies. A 
broad general education is emphasized and complemented with a 
core of professional courses. Beyond a strong core integrating man- 
agement, leisure theory, and research, the program allows students to 
focus on a major market segment within the leisure and recreation 
field by choosing an area of concentration. A total of 128 hours is 
needed for graduation for any student beginning their degree pro- 
gram on or after spring 1996. For students enrolled prior to that date, 
recreation management requires 126 hours for graduation. For further 
information, contact the Department of Leisure Studies, 1 04 Huff Hall, 
1206 S. Fourth Street, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-4410 



1. Students are advised to contact the undergraduate academic adviser for the most 
current curriculum information. 

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 

All students in the Department of Leisure Studies must satisfactorily 
complete the Internship Program prior to graduation. The program is 
designed to augment formal classroom instruction with active expe- 
riential learning under the guidance of an agency-based supervisor. 

The program consists of two courses and a pre-internship field 
experience. The pre-internship program requires students to accumu- 
late a minimum of 300 hours practical work experience in leisure 
service settings. It is strongly recommended that students begin 
acquiring field experiences as early in their academic career as pos- 
sible. Students register for LEIST 280 after achieving junior standing. 
During this semester, students make final arrangements for complet- 
ing LEIST 284 the following semester. 

The practicum is taken after the student achieves senior standing, 
satisfactorily completes all course work including LEIST 280, and 
fulfills the pre-internship field experience. LEIST 284 is taken in 
agencies that are approved and contracted for this program. Since a 
limited number of assignments for practicums are available in the 
campus area, most students look forward to the opportunity of an off- 
campus assignment. 

REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

The Campus Senate, the faculty General Education Board, and the 
colleges and departments are working to implement enhanced gen- 
eral education requirements. Some changes in requirements are ex- 
pected. Thus, new students should confirm their general education 
requirements by consulting college and departmental offices, hand- 
books, or advisers. The Department of Leisure Studies also requires 
that certain courses from the approved lists be taken as noted below. 
The prescribed courses prepare the student for upper division study 
and may be used to satisfy General Education requirements provided 
they are on the appropriate General Education List. Further informa- 
tion about career opportunities in leisure studies is available from the 
director of undergraduate studies in 104 Huff Hall, 1206 South Fourth 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-4410. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

6-7 Verbal and written communication 1 

3 Advanced composition 2 

3 Quantitative Reasoning I 

9 Natural sciences and technology 

9 Humanities and the arts 

9 Social and behavioral sciences 

6 Cultural studies 3 (two courses: one western culture and one 

nonwestern/U.S. minorities culture course) 

6 General education electives 

51 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



66 



1 . Students taking English as a Second Language may need to complete six to twelve 
hours depending on the Illinois ESL Placement Test. Students needing preparatory 
composition courses ma v also require additional hours to complete this requirement. 

2. LEIST 310, an approved Advanced Composition course, is also required in the 
professional core curriculum. 

3. The cultural studies requirement may be fulfilled by courses which also satisfy the 
humanities and the arts or the social and behavioral sciences requirements. 

HOURS LEISURE STUDIES CORE REQUIREMENTS 

3 LEIST 100 — Society and Leisure 

2 LEIST 110 — Foundations for Delivery of Leisure Services 

2 LEIST 116 — Computer Applications in Leisure Studies 

2 LEIST 130 — Leisure Services for Individuals with Disabilities 

2 LEIST 141 — Introduction to Outdoor Recreation 

4 LEIST 201 — Leisure Services Programming and Leadership 

3 LEIST 210 — Human Resource Management in Leisure 
Organizations 

LEIST 280— Orientation to Practicum 

12 LEIST 284— Leisure Studies Practicum 

3 LEIST 290 — Research in Leisure Studies 

LEIST 291 — Research Applications in Leisure Studies 

3 LEIST 310 — Leisure Service Management and Finance 

3 LEIST 316 — Leisure and Human Development 

3 LEIST 332 — Program Design and Evaluation in Leisure 

45 Total 

AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
9 



21 



RECREATION MANAGEMENT 

LEIST 218 — Recreation Business 

LEIST 240 — Leisure Resource and Facility Management 

LEIST 320 — Leisure Services Marketing 

LEIST 329 — Contemporary Issues in Leisure 

Select three of the following: 1 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 

ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 

B ADM 200 — Legal Environment of Business 

B ADM 202 — Principles of Marketing 

B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

GEOG 205 — Business Location Decision-Making 

Total 



1. Or courses approved by the academic adviser. 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
9 



21 



TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

LEIST 212 — Dynamics of Tourism 

LEIST 218 — Recreation Business 

LEIST 320 — Leisure Services Marketing 

LEIST 329 — Contemporary Issues in Leisure 

Select three of the following: 1 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 
ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 
B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 
GEOG 104— Social and Cultural Geography 
L A 134 — Site Design 

Total 



1. Or courses approved by the academic adviser. 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
9 



21 



PARK AND NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

LEIST 240 — Leisure Resource and Facility Management 
LEIST 340 — Outdoor Recreation Management 
LEIST 341 — Outdoor Recreation Resource Planning 
LEIST 344 — Social Impact Assessment 
Select three of the following: 1 

ENVST 317 — Introduction to Natural Resources Economics 

ENVST 372 — Environmental Psychology 

NRES 101 — Introduction to Forestry 

L A 134— Site Design 

U P 205 — Ecological Systems in Planning 
Total 



1. Or courses approved by the academic adviser. 

HOURS SPORTS MANAGEMENT 

3 LEIST 218 — Recreation Business 

3 LEIST 240 — Leisure Resource and Facility Management 

3 LEIST 320 — Leisure Services Marketing 

3 LEIST 329 — Contemporary Issues in Leisure 

9-10 Select three of the following: 1 

ACCY 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 

ADV 309— Public Relations 

B ADM 202 — Principles of Marketing 



21-22 



KINES 247 — Introduction to Sport Psychology 
LAW 344— Sports Law 
PSYCH 349— Social Psychology of Sport 
SOC 249— Sport and Modern Society 
Total 



1. Or courses approved by the academic adviser. 

CURRICULUM IN SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE' 

The undergraduate curriculum in Speech and Hearing Science can be 
taken as a broad background in the biological, behavioral, linguistic, 
and social foundations of human communication, with the intent of 
pursuing graduate education in many fields related to human com- 
munication and health. The curriculum may also be taken as a pre- 
professional program for individuals who specifically plan to work as 
speech-language pathologists in medical or school settings or as 
audiologists. The degree requires at least 128 hours, excluding mili- 
tary training. Undergraduate students who wish to become speech- 
language pathologists must plan on continuing their studies at the 
graduate level because the Masters degree is the minimum level of 
academic preparation required for certification by the American 
Speech-Language-Hearing Association. In addition to required 
courses, students who desire to work in the public schools in the State 
of Illinois can fulfill requirements for State Teacher Certification by 
completing an additional set of courses specified in the undergradu- 
ate curriculum. For further information, contact the Department of 
Speech and Hearing Science, 220 Speech and Hearing Building, 901 S. 
Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820, (217) 333-2230. 



1. Students are advised that the curriculum is currently being reviewed and revised. 
Therefore it is important that the undergraduate academic adviser be contacted for the 
most current curriculum information. 

REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING GENERAL EDUCATION 

The Department of Speech and Hearing Science requires that certain 
courses from the approved lists be taken as noted below. The pre- 
scribed courses prepare the student for upper division study and may 
be used to satisfy General Education requirements provided they are 
on the appropriate General Education List. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

6-7 SPCOM 111 and 112, or RHET 105 and SPCOM 101, or RHET 

108 and SPCOM 101 

3 Course in advanced writing (Composition II) 

3-6 Natural science and technology (biological science) 1 

3-6 Natural science and technology (physical science) 

3 STAT 100— Statistics 

6-8 Social and behavioral science 2 

6-8 Humanities and the arts 2 

0-16 Foreign language 3 

3 Non-western cultures and traditions 

2 Health and/or physical education 

35-62 Total 

1. At least one course in either the biological or physical sciences must include a lab. 

2. If the student is interested in the school speech-pathology program, courses from 
these areas should include one course in political science covering the state and federal 
constitutions, one course in U.S. History, and one course in British or American 
Literature. 

3. Requirement may be satisfied if the student has: (1) completed either four years 
foreign language in high school, or (2) completed the equivalent of four semesters 
foreign language in college, or (3) completed three years of one foreign language in 
high school and three semesters of a different language. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR 

3 LING 200 — Introduction to Language Science 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology or PSYCH 103— 
Introduction to Experimental Psychology 

3 PSYCH 216— Child Psychology or ED PSY 236— Child 

Development 
3 PSYCH 238— Abnormal Psychology or PSYCH 250— 

Psychology of Personality 
3 PSYCH 224— Cognitive Psychology or PSYCH 248— 

Psychology of Learning and Memory 
16 Total 

HOURS SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS 

3 SPSHS 102 — Human Communication: Systems, Processes, 

and Disorders 



INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 
67 



SPSHS 199— Pre-Practicum in Speech Pathology 

SPSHS 201— General Phonetics 

SPSHS 375 and 376— Speech Science, I and II 

SPSHS 378— Hearing Science 

SPSHS 383 — Development of Spoken Language 

SPSHS 385 and 388— Speech Pathology, I and II 

SPSHS 386 — Language Disorders in Children 

SPSHS 389— Appraisal in Speech Pathology 

SPSHS 390— Introduction to Hearing Disorders and 

Audiometry 

SPSHS 393— Aural Habilitation and Rehabilitation 

Total 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

For students planning to pursue the school speech and hearing science 
program, the following are recommended: 

HOURS RECOMMENDED 

3 SP ED 117— Exceptional Children 

SP ED 324 — Tests and measurements in Special Education 



2 
5 

HOURS 

3 
3 
6 



Total 

RECOMMENDED FOR ILLINOIS CERTIFICATION 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 
ED PSY 211— Educational Psychology 
Total 



Recommended Elective Areas. To reach the 128 semester hours 
required for a degree, students are encouraged to choose electives in 
the following areas: math, computer science, physics, psychology, 
education, physiology, linguistics, psycholinguistics, special educa- 
tion, and additional courses in speech and hearing sciences 

Departmental Honors. Students whose overall grade point aver- 
age is 3.5 or higher are eligible to enroll in the Departmental Honors 
Program. Qualified students will be able to earn Departmental Dis- 
tinction by completing a significant independent project/senior the- 
sis. To enter the Honors program, qualified students will be expected 
to register for two hours of credit in SPSHS 291 during each of their last 
two undergraduate semesters and to complete significant work as 
part of that course. A detailed statement of these requirements, as well 
as requirements for graduation with Departmental Distinction, are 
available in the department office. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

This program is designed for students enrolled in a teacher education 
curriculum other than in the Department of Kinesiology. Students 
who wish to complete this minor must consult with an academic 
adviser in the Department of Kinesiology. 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

1 KINES 130 — Fundamental Analysis and Performance of Basic 

Movement Skills 
1 KINES 131— Movement Skills: Fitness 

1 KINES 133— Movement Skills: Dance 

1 KINES 135— Movement Skills: Field Activities 

2 Choose from: 

KINES 132— Movement Skills: Swimming 
KINES 134 — Movement Skills: Gymnastics 
KINES 136 — Movement Skills: Racquet Activities 

3 KINES 140— Social Scientific Bases of Sport 

3 KINES 150 — Bioscientific Foundations of Human Movement 

3 KINES 257— Coordination, Control, and Skill 

3 KINES 263— Physical Education Curriculum 

3 KINES 267— Adapted Physical Education 

3 KINES 273 — Instructional Strategies in Physical Education 

3 KINES 301 — Observation and Evaluation in Kinesiology 

3-5 PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology, or CSB 

234 — Functional Human Anatomy 
30-32 Total 

ATHLETIC TRAINING EMPHASIS 

This program is designed for the student interested in pursuing a 
career in athletic training, as well as for the student interested in 
athletic training as an adjunct to his or her career. Applicants must 
have been admitted to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
and must take the National Athletic Trainer's Association-approved 
courses, as well as approved University courses. Students must have 
the cumulative GPA required based on the semester hours of credit 
earned at the time of selection. 



5 CSB 234 — Functional Human Anatomy 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology, or PSYCH 103— 
Introduction to Experimental Psychology 

3 Choose from: 

PSYCH 238— Abnormal Psychology 

PSYCH 216— Child Psychology 

KINES 247— Introduction to Sport Psychology 

3 CHLTH 100— Contemporary Health 

3 FSHN 120— Contemporary Nutrition 

2 KINES 120— Injuries in Sport 

2 KINES 220— Fundamental of Athletic Training 

3 KINES 222 — Bases for Prescription of Therapeutic Exercises 
3 KINES 252 — Bioenergetics of Human Movement 

3 KINES 255 — Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement 

5 KINES 288 — Supervised Experiences in Athletic Training 
3 KINES 301 — Observation and Evaluation in Kinesiology 

3 KINES 320 — Advanced Assessment of Athletic Injuries 

2 KINES 321— Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training 

Optional but recommended: 

4 KINES 322 — Neuophysiological Bases of Therapeutic 
Exercise 



Institute of Aviation 



Willard Airport 
One Willard Road 
Savoy, IL 61874 
(217) 244-8601 

The Institute of Aviation is responsible for the promotion and corre- 
lation of education and research activities related to aviation at the 
University. Its director has the advice and assistance of an executive 
committee. The Institute holds Federal Aviation Administration (F AA) 
Airman Examining (Pilot) Agency Certificate Number 1, which per- 
mits it to issue pilot certificates and ratings to its graduates on behalf 
of the FAA. A professional pilot curriculum includes training from the 
private pilot level to the airline-transport pilot level. 

Typically, new freshmen are accepted for admission only for the 
fall semester, but a few students are accepted for the spring semester. 
Transfer to the Institute of Aviation from within the University may be 
accomplished as space permits. 

A graduating Institute student may transfer to any degree-grant- 
ing division of the University to complete requirements for a degree 
in that division. This may require from four to six additional semes- 
ters. A University student outside the Institute of Aviation may elect 
flight courses with the permission of his or her department and the 
permission of the Institute of Aviation. 

Special fees ranging from $1,128 to $5,266 are charged for a course 
involving flight training in addition to the estimated costs listed in the 
Student Costs section. These fees are subject to change as operating 
costs change. 

The Institute's Aviation Research Laboratory conducts interdisci- 
plinary research in many areas related to flight. The Institute manages 
Willard Airport, located six miles southwest of the Urbana-Cham- 
paign campus. The airport also provides the University and the 
community with excellent air transportation facilities. 



Requirements 



ADMISSION 

Applicants must meet general University requirements as well as 
those specified by the Institute of Aviation. Additional units in phys- 
ics, mathematics, and the social sciences are recommended. 



Curricula 



PROFESSIONAL PILOT CURRICULUM' 



First year 



HOURS 

4 



REQUIRED COURSES 

PHYSL 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 AVI 101— Private Pilot, I 

3 ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles or ECON 103- 

Macroeconomic Principles 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



68 



HIST 111— History of Western Civilization to 1815, or HIST 
151— History- of the United States to 1877 



Departments and Curricula 



3 


SPCOM 111 — Verbal Communication 


3 


Free elective 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


AVI 120— Private Pilot, II 


3 


MATH 125 — Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications 


4 


HIST 112— History of Western Civilization, 1815 to the 




Present, or HIST 152— History of the United States, 1877 to 




the Present 


3 


SPCOM 112— Verbal Communication 


3 


Free elective 


16 


Total 


Second 


year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


3 


AVI 130 — Commercial-Instrument, I 


4 


MATH 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists, I 


3 


Humanities elective 


6 


Free electives 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


AVI 140 — Commercial-Instrument, II 


3 


C S 105 — Introduction to Computers and Their Application to 




Business and Commerce 


4 


Humanities electives 


6 


Free electives 


16 


Total 



NOTES: 

— HIST 111 and 112, or HIST 151 and 152 should be chosen. 

— Humanities electives should be chosen to comply with University general education 
requirements. 

— Two additional flight courses, AVI 200 and AVI 210, must be taken to complete 

requirements for the commercial certificate with instrument rating. 



1. Other elective options are available. A student interested in a B.A. or B.S. degree in 
addition to the aviation curriculum should explore options combining this curriculum 
with curricula in business administration, agricultural economics, education, 
journalism, psychology, etc. A brochure listing sample programs is available from the 
Institute of Aviation upon request. 



College of Commerce and Business 
Administration 



214 David Kinley Hall 
1407 West Gregory Drive 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2740 

The purpose of the College of Commerce and Business Administra- 
tion is to provide an educational experience that will help students 
develop their potential for leadership and service in business, govern- 
ment, teaching, and research. The undergraduate curricula provide a 
study of the basic aspects of business and preparation for careers in 
fields such as accounting, business management, banking, insurance, 
and marketing. 

The curricula, leading to the bachelor of science degrees in the 
various degree programs in business, are based on four years of 
college work. Students are required to elect courses in other colleges 
of the University, including mathematics, rhetoric, humanities and 
the arts, speech, and natural and behavioral sciences, and to secure as 
liberal an education as possible to avoid the narrowing effects of 
overspecialization. Through a cooperative arrangement with the Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students in that college may major 
in economics or finance. 

The College of Commerce and Business Administration offers 
graduate and professional programs in one of the areas of business 
and economics, or in a nonbusiness area such as liberal arts, science, 
or engineering. Detailed information on graduate programs may be 
obtained from the Graduate College. 



Undergraduate instruction in the College of Commerce and Business 
Administration is organized under the Departments of Accountancy, 
Business Administration, Economics, and Finance. Each of these 
departments offers courses that provide one or more curricula that a 
student may elect. These curricula lead to bachelor of science degrees 
in the various fields of study in the college and are designed to 
encourage each student to develop fully his or her intellectual 
capacity. 



Requirements 



ADMISSION 

Applicants must meet general University requirements as well as 
those specified by the College of Commerce and Business 
Administration. 

Students transferring from other colleges must have achieved 
junior standing and met the requirements specified by the college. 

MATHEMATICS PLACEMENT TEST 

Students are required to take the Mathematics Placement Test before 
registering in the college. The results of the test are used to place 
students in MATH 112 or to exempt them from college algebra and 
allow them to enroll in the first course of one of the mathematics 
sequences required for graduation (see below). 

GRADUATION 

Students in the College of Commerce and Business Administration 
who meet the University's requirements with reference to registra- 
tion, residence, and fees and who maintain satisfactory scholastic 
records in the college are awarded degrees appropriate to their 
curricula. 

Each candidate for a degree must have a 2.0 (A = 4.0) grade point 
average or above for all courses counted toward graduation, a 2.0 
grade point average or above for all courses taken at this University, 
a 2.0 grade point average or above for all courses taken in the major or 
field of concentration, and a 2.0 grade point average or above for 
courses taken in the major or field of concentration at this University. 
Each student may select only one major or field of concentration. 

Students are responsible for meeting the requirements for gradu- 
ation. Therefore, students should familiarize themselves with the 
requirements listed in this catalog and other information in the Office 
of Undergraduate Affairs, 214 David Kinley Hall, and should refer to 
them each time they plan their programs. 

MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT 

Any one of the sequences described below meets the College of 
Commerce and Business Administration requirement. A new student 
need only select which mathematics sequence to enter. Decisions on 
how far to go in a sequence can be made later as the student gains 
experience and firms up career objectives. 

The most appropriate mathematics sequence depends on the 
student's background, interest, motivation, and objectives. Back- 
ground can be evaluated in terms of mathematics courses already 
completed and the student's score on the Mathematics Placement 
Test. Interest, motivation, and objectives must be determined by the 
student. The four sequences open to the student are: 
— MATH 135. This course provides a thorough background in calcu- 
lus for students having a previous analytic geometry course. This 
course or the next sequence should be chosen by students whose 
interests and objectives require strong mathematics. 
— MATH 120 and 130. This sequence is appropriate for those students 
with a good background in mathematics but who have not had 
analytic geometry. Students who believe they may want to take 
upper-level courses in mathematics should take this sequence. 
— MATH 125 and 134. This sequence provides a good background in 
linear algebra and calculus. It is difficult to take upper-level courses in 
mathematics after this sequence. 

— MATH 120 and 125. This is an alternative to the previous sequence. 
It is particularly suitable for those with AP credit in calculus who do 
not plan to take upper-level mathematics courses. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



69 



RESIDENCY 

Students must spend either the first three years, earning not fewer 
than 90 semester hours, or the last year (two semesters, or the equiva- 
lent), earning not fewer than 30 semester hours, in residence on the 
Urbana-Champaign campus, uninterrupted by any work at another 
institution. 

Transfer students from community or junior colleges must, after 
attaining junior standing, earn at the University of Illinois or another 
approved four-year institution at least 60 semester hours acceptable 
toward their degree. 

Special Programs 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Honors, designated on diplomas, are awarded to superior students as 
follows: for graduation with honors, a minimum grade point average 
of 3.5 (A = 4.0) in all courses accepted toward the student's degree; for 
graduation with high honors, a minimum grade point average of 3.75 
in all courses accepted toward the degree; and for graduation with 
highest honors, a minimum grade point average of 3.90 in all courses 
accepted toward the degree. To qualify for graduation honors, trans- 
fer students' UIUC and total cumulative grade point averages must 
qualify. 

Curricula 



CORE CURRICULUM 

Normally, students must register for not fewer than 12 hours or more 
than 18 hours in each semester. Students should take mathematics, 
economics, and accountancy courses in the semesters indicated in the 
sample schedule of courses. The computer science course must be 
taken during the first year. A required course that is failed must be 
repeated the next semester. 

A student with fewer than 30 hours of credit is required to have his 
or her program for the semester approved by an adviser in the college 
office. 

Up to 4 hours of credit in basic physical education may be counted 
in the 124 hours necessary for graduation. Physical education grades 
are counted in the graduation grade point average. 

Any course used to fill a specific degree requirement may not be 
taken on the credit-no credit grade option. Only free electives may be 
taken on the credit-no credit option. 

HOURS 

4-7 
3 



UNIVERSITY COMPOSITION REQUIREMENTS 

Composition I: Principles of Composition 1 

Composition II: Business and Technical Writing or Advanced 

Rhetoric 1 

HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS' 

24 A minimum of six courses is required, as follows: 

Humanities and the arts (3 courses):* 

Literature and the arts (1-2 courses) 

Historical and philosophical perspectives (1-2 courses) 
Natural sciences and technology (2 courses):** 

Physical science (0-2 courses) 

Biological science (0-2 courses) 
Behavioral science (1 course) 
Cultural studies (2 courses): 

Non-western cultures/U.S. minorities (1 course) 

Western cultures/comparative cultures (1 course) 

HOURS FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

0-12 Completion of the third semester or equivalent of one 

language is required. Completion of three years of a single 
language in high school satisfies this requirement. For 
freshmen enrolling in 2000 and transfer students enrolling in 
2002, this requirement is expected to increase to four 
semesters in college or four years in high school. 

*At least one of the courses in the humanities and the arts area must be a 200 or higher 

level course. 

**It is strongly recommended that one course be taken in each area. 

HOURS BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS 

6 ACCY 201 and 202— Principles of Accounting, I and II 

3 B ADM 200 — Legal Environment of Business 

3 B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 

3 B ADM 210 2 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

3 B ADM 389— Business Policy 



3 C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Business and Commerce 
6 ECON 102 and 103— Microeconomic and Macroeconomic 

Principles 

6 ECON 172 and 173— Economic Statistics, I and II 
3 ECON 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 
3 FIN 254 — Corporate Finance 

7 MATH 125 and 134 3 — Introductory Analysis for Social 
Scientists 

3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

49-50 Total business core requirements 

HOURS MAJOR 

15-38 Courses to yield this total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

0-32 Elective course work 

124 min Total hours for the degree 

1. For a list of the specific courses that meet this requirement, see the college Office of 
Undergraduate Affairs in 214 David Kinley Hall. 

2. This course includes limited voluntary participation as a subject in experiments. 

3. MATH 135, or MATH 120 and 130, or MATH 120 and 125 may be substituted for 
MATH 125 and 134. (See college mathematics requirement above.) 



SAMPLE SCHEDULE 
First year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 ECON 102 — Microeconomic Principles 

3 MATH 125 — Elementary Linear Algebra with Applications 

3 C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Business and Commerce 

4 Composition I 

3-4 General education or foreign language 

16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 

4 MATH 134— Calculus for Social Scientists, I 

3 SPCOM 101— Principles of Effective Speaking 

3-4 General education or foreign language 

3 General education 

16-17 Total 



Second year 



HOURS 

3 

3 

6-7 

3 

15-16 

HOURS 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3-4 

15-16 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ACCY 201 — Principles of Accounting, I 

ECON 172— Economic Statistics, I 

General education or foreign language 

General education or elective 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

ACCY 202 — Principles of Accounting, II 

ECON 173— Economic Statistics, II 

FIN 254 — Corporate Finance 

ECON 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 

General education or electives 

Total 



HOURS 

3 
9 
3 
15 

HOURS 

3 
3 
9 
15 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 

Major or elective or general education 

Composition II 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

B ADM 200 — The Legal Environment of Business 
B ADM 202 — Principles of Marketing 
Major and elective or general education 
Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

15-16 Major and electives or general education 

15-16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

12 Major and electives 

3 B ADM 389— Business Policy 

15 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



70 



CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTANCY 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Accountancy 

Organizations are a nexus of contracts, implicit and explicit, among 
resource owners who contract with each other to the benefit of all. In 
most complex organizations, these contracts specify who has the 
knowledge, and thus the rights, to make decisions about the use and 
control of the contracted resources. The effectiveness and efficiency of 
decisions regarding initiation, execution, and monitoring of organiza- 
tions' contracts depend on the quantity and quality of information 
available. The accountant assists in the development, accumulation, 
evaluation, and dissemination of the information necessary for con- 
tracting parties to make effective and efficient contracting decisions. 
Organizations, in turn, contract with various segments of society such 
as labor unions, capital markets, regulatory agencies, and govern- 
ments. The accountant assists in the development, accumulation, 
evaluation, and dissemination of the information necessary for ensur- 
ing that organizations comply with the terms of their social contracts. 

Study in accountancy is designed to prepare individuals for entry 
into the accountancy professions independent of subsequent special- 
ization. This preparation includes knowledge of the activities of 
organizations, businesses, and accounting practices; intellectual, in- 
terpersonal, and communication skills; and personal capabilities and 
professional attitudes. Specializations in accountancy include such 
fields as financial accounting, management accounting, accounting 
information systems, taxation, and auditing. Specialization in an 
accounting field requires additional graduate education and practical 
experience. 

Minimum requirements in the major for the Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Accountancy are: 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



COURSE 

ACCY 300— Professional Development Workshop 
ACCY 301— Accounting Measurement & Disclosure 
ACCY 302 — Decision Making for Accountancy 
ACCY 303— Accounting Institutions & Regulation 
ACCY 304 — Accounting Control Systems 
ACCY 305 — Assurance & Attestation 
Accountancy elective. Must be 300-level course. 



21 TOTAL 

Accountancy courses may not be taken on a credit-no credit basis 
unless all requirements of the major have been satisfied. A limit of 33 
hours of accountancy courses (including ACCY 201 and ACCY 202) 
may be counted toward the 124 total hours required for the Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Accountancy. 



CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration 

The Department of Business Administration offers eight separate 
undergraduate concentrations: marketing, organizational adminis- 
tration, production, management science, industrial distribution man- 
agement, management information systems, entrepreneurship, and 
food and agribusiness management. 

Marketing encompasses those business activities directly related 
to the process of placing meaningful assortments of goods and ser- 
vices in the hands of the consumer. The marketing student is con- 
cerned with the efficient performance of marketing activities and with 
their effective coordination with the other operations of the firm. 
Organizational administration is concerned primarily with the effec- 
tive utilization of human resources within the business organization. 
Attention is focused on the organization as a social system and the 
forces that affect this system, such as the behavior of individuals and 
groups, economic conditions, and technology. Production and opera- 
tions management is concerned primarily with the efficient utilization 
of the organization's material resources. Attention is focused on the 
design and improvement of productive capacity and the coordination 
of the productive process with other system activities. The industrial 
distribution management concentration stresses the distribution and 
logistics function in the industrial sector of the economy, with particu- 
lar reference to the industrial distributor. Problems in the manage- 
ment of industrial distribution businesses, both as suppliers to and 
customers of manufacturers and other businesses, receive special 
attention. The concentration in management information systems 



permits students to acquire the skills necessary as systems analysts to 
analyze management's needs for information and identify efficient 
and effective methods to provide management with such informa- 
tion. Such analysts have played an increasingly important role in 
business and government over the past 20 years. Entrepreneurship is 
the study of the emerging and rapidly growing business organization. 
It is intended for students who hope to start and own their own 
businesses. The concentration in food and agribusiness management 
emphasizes management in one of the most challenging and impor- 
tant sectors in the U.S. and world economies. Food and agribusiness 
executives will need to be trained to apply innovative management 
thinking to deal with technological change, global business ventures, 
and changing food habits and tastes among consumers. 

Requirements for the degree are B ADM 321— Individual Behavior 
in Organizations, or B ADM 322— Group Processes in the Organiza- 
tion, or B ADM 323— Organizational Design and Environment; B 
ADM 274— Operations Research; PSYCH 201; and one of the follow- 
ing concentrations: 



HOURS 

6 



HOURS 

12 



HOURS 

6 



HOURS 

9-10 



HOURS 



2-4 



2-4 
3 



MARKETING 

B ADM 320— Marketing Research, and B ADM 344— Buyer 

Behavior 

Choose one of the following: 

ADV 383— Advertising Media Planning 
B ADM 212— Principles of Retailing 
B ADM 337 — Promotion Management 
B ADM 352— Pricing Policies 

B ADM 360— Marketing to Business and Government 
B ADM 370— International Marketing 
B ADM 380 — Advanced Marketing Management 
ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 
From the following list, a student must take four courses, 
three of which must be B ADM 321, 322, 323, or 351: 
B ADM 321— Individual Behavior in Organizations 
B ADM 322 — Group Processes in the Organization 
B ADM 323— Organizational Design and Environment 
B ADM 351 — Personnel Administration 
L I R 345 — Economics of Human Resources 
POL S 361 — Introduction to Public Administration 
POL S 362— Administrative Organization and Policy 

Development 
PSYCH 355— Industrial Social Psychology 
PSYCH 357— Psychology of Industrial Relations 
SOC 318— Industry and Society 
SOC 359 — The Social Psychology of Organization 
PRODUCTION 

B ADM 314— Production and B ADM 315— Management in 
Manufacturing 
One course from the following: 

ACCY 322— Managerial Accounting and Organizational 

Controls 
B ADM 323— Organizational Design and Environment 
B ADM 351— Personnel Administration 
B ADM 369— Logistics Management 
PSYCH 258 — Human Factors in Human-Machine Systems 
PSYCH 356 — Human Performance and Engineering 
Psychology 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

A student may satisfy this option by taking any three courses 
approved in advance by the department head. Recommended 
sequences among the mathematics courses are either MATH 
315 and 383, or MATH 361 or 363; and MATH 366. Selected 
courses include: 

3 ACCY 322 — Managerial Accounting and 

Organizational Controls 
3 B ADM 380 — Advanced Marketing Management 

3 MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

3 MATH 361— Introduction to Probability Theory, I 

4 MATH 363 — Introduction to Mathematical Statistics 
and Probability, I 

3 MATH 364— Introduction to Mathematical Statistics 

and Probability, II 
3 MATH 366— Introduction to Probability Theory, II 

3 MATH 383 — Linear Programming 



INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT 

A student must take the following courses: 

B ADM 294A— Practicum in Industrial Distribution 

Management, or 294B— Practicum in Manufacturing (taken 

during summer of junior year) 1 

B ADM 295— Senior Research 

B ADM 314 — Production, or I E 388 — Applications of 

Operations Research to Industrial Systems 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

71 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

2-4 



B ADM 315 — Management in Manufacturing 

B ADM 320— Marketing Research 

B ADM 343 — Purchasing and Materials Management 

B ADM 360 — Marketing to Business and Government 

B ADM 369 — Logistics Management 

G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

PHYCS 140— Practical Physics: How Things Work— A Course 

for Nonscientists 

Students must take any one of the following courses: 
3 ACCY 221— Cost Accounting 2 

B ADM 345 — Small Business Consulting 

B ADM 346 — Entrepreneurship: Small Business 

Formation 2 

B ADM 351 — Personnel Administration 

B ADM 352— Pricing Policies 2 

B ADM 391 — Introduction to Management 

Information Systems 

B ADM 392 — Information Organization for 

Management Information Systems 

B ADM 393 — Management Information System 

Development 

B&T W 271— Persuasive Writing 

FIN 322 — Case Studies in Corporate Finance 2 

FIN 324 — Financing of Emerging Businesses 

I E 335— Industrial Quality Control 2 

PSYCH 245— Industrial Organizational Psychology 

SPCOM 211 — Business and Professional Speaking 

SPCOM 230 — Interpersonal Communication 



CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS 



1 . Although only one summer practicum is required, it is recommended that students 
participate in two. 

2. Strongly recommended. 



HOURS 
12 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 
A student must take four of the following five courses': 
B ADM 391 — Introduction to Management Information 

Systems 
B ADM 392 — Information Organization for Management 

Information Systems 
B ADM 393 — Management Information System 

Development 
B ADM 394 — Management Information and Control 

Systems 
B ADM 395 — Decision Support Systems 



1. Substitutions may be approved by the head of the Department of Business 
Administration for no more than two of the required courses. Acceptable substitutes 
include C S 300, 301, 302, 303, and 311. 

HOURS FOOD AND AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Students must take the following two courses and a summer 
internship: 

3 B ADM 338 — Strategic Marketing in Food and Agribusiness 

4 B ADM 339 — Practicum in Food and Agribusiness 
Management 

6-7 Students must also select two courses from the following list: 

ACE 343 — Intermediate Financial Management and 

Markets 
ACE 325 — Economics of Food Marketing 
ACE 328 — Commodity Futures Market and Trading 
ACE 355 — International Trade in Food and Agriculture 

HOURS ENTREPRENEURSHIP 

4 B ADM 345 — Small Business Consulting 

4 B ADM 346 — Entrepreneurship: Small Business Formation 

4 B ADM 347 — Legal Strategies for the Entrepreneurial Firm 

3 FIN 324 — Financing Emerging Businesses 

ADVISING NOTES: 

— Students wishing to concentrate in production are advised (not required) to fulfill 

the college mathematics requirement with MATH 120 and 130, or MATH 135. 

— B ADM 389 should be taken after all requirements in the concentration have been 

satisfied. 

— Courses used to fulfill concentration requirements may not be taken on a credit-no 

credit basis. 

— Beyond the required courses in composition, general education, the business core 

and major, at least 16 elective hours must be selected from outside business 

administration, accountancy, or finance (10 hours for students majoring in industrial 

distribution management). 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics 

Economics has been defined as the study of how people use limited 
resources to produce various goods and services for the unlimited 
material wants of the population. So, the economist is concerned with 
what is produced, how goods and services are distributed, the orga- 
nization of industries, labor supply and its use, international trade, 
production and distribution of national income, government finance, 
and the use and conservation of land and natural resources. 

An economics major, like all CBA majors, first establishes a core of 
knowledge in intermediate economic theory and statistics. The stu- 
dent may then specialize in one of several areas such as taxation and 
government finance, international economics, economic history, la- 
bor economics, economic development, quantitative economics, or 
public policy. The economics major can alternatively take a general 
rather than specialized approach to economics. 

An economics major is well prepared for further study in an 
M.B. A. or law program or for graduate work in areas such as econom- 
ics, planning and administration, or policy studies. Career opportuni- 
ties include sales and management positions in business, industry, 
and government; teaching and administrative positions in colleges 
and universities; and research positions in private and public institu- 
tions. 

Requirements for the degree include ECON 301 plus 12 additional 
hours in economics at the 200 or 300 level (excluding ECON 295 and 
299). Students with interest in further work in economics are advised 
to fulfill the college mathematics requirement with MATH 120 and 
130 or MATH 135, and to take additional training in courses such as 
MATH 242 or 245 and MATH 315. 

Courses used to satisfy a major in economics may not be taken on 
a credit-no credit basis. 



CURRICULUM IN FINANCE 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Finance 

The field of finance is primarily concerned with the acquisition and 
management of funds by business firms, governments, and individu- 
als. A business seeks financial advice when considering the purchase 
of new equipment, the expansion of present facilities, or the raising of 
additional funds. Determining the value of financial and real assets 
and derivatives is a key activity in finance. 

As the study of finance is designed to provide the student with 
both the theoretical background and the analytical tools required to 
make effective judgments in finance, many students select careers in 
business financial management, commercial and investment bank- 
ing, investments, government finance, insurance, and real estate. 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

3 FIN 300— Financial Markets (Prerequisite: FIN 254; C S 105 or 

electronic spreadsheet competency) 
9 Three additional finance courses must be taken. Any finance 

course except FIN 199 is eligible to satisfy this requirement. 
See Career Tracks below, or talk to an adviser for other 
options. 
3 Major elective. Choose one of the following: 

ACCY 211 — Intermediate Accounting, I (Prerequisite: 

ACCY 202) 
ACCY 221— Cost Accounting (Prerequisite: ACCY 202) 
ACCY 251 — Basic Federal Tax Accounting (Prerequisite: 

ACCY 202) 
ACCY 301* — Accounting Measurement & Disclosure 

(Prerequisite: ACCY 202) 
ACCY 302* — Decision Making for Accountancy 

(Prerequisite: ACCY 202) 
ACCY 303* — Accounting Institutions and Regulation 
(Prerequisite: ACCY 301 or consent of instructor) 
ACCY 304* — Accounting Control Systems (Prerequisite: 

ACCY 301 and 302 or consent of instructor) 
ACCY 310* — Financial Accounting Reporting Standards 

(Prerequisite: ACCY 303 or consent of instructor) 
ACCY 311 — Intermediate Accounting, II (Prerequisite: 

ACCY 211) 
ACCY 312* — Taxation Rules and Regulations 

(Prerequisite: ACCY 202) 
B ADM 274— Operations Research (Prerequisite: ECON 
173 or consent of instructor) 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



72 



CEE 216 — Construction Engineering (Prerequisite: CEE 

292; credit or concurrent registration in C S 101 and 

CEE 293) 
Economics: any 200- or 300-level course excluding ECON 

300 
G E 288 or G E 292 
GEOG 383 — Urban Geography 
Mathematics or statistics: any course above the minimum 

mathematics or statistics requirement of the college. 
Other courses as recommended by the Department of 

Finance faculty and approved by the Department of 

Finance chairperson. 



"Project Discover)' courses 

ADVISING NOTES: 

— Courses taken to fulfill major requirements may not be taken on a credit-no credit 

basis. 

— It is recommended that finance majors take nine to twelve hours of accounting. 

ACCY 201 and 202 are required. However, many employers look favorably upon 

additional accounting courses. It is possible to earn enough hours to take the CPA 

exam. 

— Career tracks: No specific courses are required. It is possible, though, to select 

courses to match areas of interest. Possible combinations include: 

Corporate finance: FIN 301, 321, 322, 323, and 324 

Investments: FIN 361, 362, 372, 384 

Financial institutions and markets: FIN 301, 321, 322, 361, 364, 388 

Insurance and risk management: FIN 260, 262, 341, 343, 345, 360 

Real estate and urban economics: FIN 264, 382, 384, 386, 388, 390 
— Typical seasonal offerings: 

Fall: FIN 260, 382, 386, 390 

Spring: FIN 341, 343, 384, 388 

Once a year (semester depends on faculty availability): FIN 323, 345, 360, 364, 372 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ECONOMICS 



HOURS 

4-6 

6 

3 

12 



REQUIRED COURSES 

ECON 102 and 103 (or ECON 101) 

ECON 300 and 301 

ECON 172 or equivalent work in statistics (ECON 173 is 

recommended but not required) 

Twelve additional hours in economics. Choose at least one 

course in each of the following areas: 

History, History Of Thought, Comparative Systems 
3 ECON 236 — American Economic History 

3 ECON 238 — European Economic History 

3 ECON 255 — Comparative Economic Systems 

3 ECON 306 — History of Economic Thought 

3 ECON 357 — The Russian Economy 

3 ECON 358— The Economy of China 

3 ECON 359— The Israeli Economy 

Public Sector, Labor 

3 ECON 214 — Introduction to Public Finance 

3 ECON 240— Labor Problems 

3 ECON 245— Women in the Labor Market 

3 ECON 303 — Macroeconomic Policy 

3 ECON 313 — Economics of Consumption 

3 ECON 314— Public Sector Economics 

3 ECON 315 — The Economics of Poverty and Income 

Maintenance 
3 ECON 341 — Economics of Labor Markets 

3 ECON 343 — Unions, Bargaining, and Public Policy 

3 ECON 345 — Economics of Human Resources 

3 ECON 346 — Family Economics 

3 ECON 360 — Regional Economics 

3 ECON 361— Urban Economics 

3 ECON 380 — Industrial Competition and Monopoly 

3 ECON 381 — Government Regulation of Economic 

Activity 
3 ECON 383— Health Economics 

3 ECON 388— Law and Economics 



International, Development 



ECON 328 — International Economics 

ECON 329 — Contemporary Issues in the 

International Economy 

ECON 350 — The Developing Economies 

ECON 351 — The Development of the Japanese 

Economy 

ECON 352 — Economic Development in Latin 

America 

ECON 353 — Economic Development in India and 

Southeast Asia 

ECON 354 — Economic Development of Tropical 

Africa 



College of Communications 



119 Gregory Hall 
810 South Wright Street 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2350 

For students with two years of college and a commitment to a career 
in communications, the College of Communications offers an addi- 
tional two years of education leading to bachelor of science degrees in 
advertising, in journalism, and in media studies. 

Through its professional programs, the college strives to give 
students in advertising and journalism broad career competence in 
their chosen fields of communications, while ensuring that they 
acquire solid backgrounds in the social sciences and humanities. Its 
premise is that students need an understanding of people and the 
world they live in if they are to communicate effectively through print 
and electronic media. 

Through its non-professional media studies program, the college 
offers students the opportunity to study, analyze, and critique mod- 
ern communications media, again with a firm foundation in the social 
sciences and humanities. 

The college has modern equipment and facilities for teaching 
future communications practitioners — reporting, editing, graphic arts, 
and photojournalism laboratories, in addition to editing studios for 
radio and television production and the new Richmond Journalism 
Teaching Studio. The Communications Library is generally recog- 
nized as one of the best in the nation. The departments of advertising 
and journalism maintain job placement services for their students. 

The college is also the supervising administrative unit for the 
University Broadcasting Division (WILL- AM, -FM, and -TV) and the 
Institute of Communications Research, where the media studies pro- 
gram is administered. 

Instruction in journalism at the University was begun in 1902 as 
part of the course offering in rhetoric and was organized as a division 
of the Department of English in 1916. The School of Journalism was 
established in 1927 as a separate unit. In 1950, it became the School of 
Journalism and Communications with divisions of journalism, adver- 
tising, and radio, the last of which later added instruction in television. 
In 1957 the school was elevated to college status, and two years later 
the college's three divisions were redesignated as departments. The 
present name — College of Communications — was adopted in 1968. 

Departments and Curricula 

Through its Departments of Advertising and Journalism, the college, 
which has been accredited by the American Council on Education for 
Journalism and Mass Communication, offers professional education 
in three sequences — advertising, news-editorial journalism, and broad- 
cast journalism. A bachelor of science degree is also offered in media 
studies through the Institute of Communications Research. 

The Department of Advertising supervises work in the advertising 
curriculum for students expecting to enter advertising agencies or the 
advertising departments of companies, communications media, in- 
dustrial organizations, or retail stores. The department aims to edu- 
cate students to become analytical, flexible, and creative professionals 
who are able to deal with current and future advertising challenges. 

The Department of Journalism seeks to prepare students for varied 
and long-term careers in print and electronic journalism. The primary 
professional aim of the news-editorial and broadcast sequences is to 
train students as public affairs reporters by providing them with the 
skills, knowledge, and understanding required for success as journal- 
ists. The department aims to prepare broadly educated professionals 
who will eventually assume decision-making and leadership roles. 

The Institute of Communications Research, through the media 
studies curriculum, gives students concentrated formal academic 
study in the development of the communications media and their 
underlying technologies. 

The Departments of Advertising and Journalism offer graduate 
programs leading to master of science degrees in advertising and in 
journalism. The college offers an interdisciplinary program leading to 
the doctor of philosophy in communications under the direction of the 
Institute of Communications Research. 



27min Total' 



1 Minimum of 25 hours if ECON 101 is taken. 



COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 



73 



Requirements 



ADMISSION 

For admission to the College of Communications, a student must 
complete 60 semester hours of acceptable undergraduate college 
work and present a grade point average of at least 3.0 (A = 4.0) and 
evidence of interest in the practice and/or study of communications. 
The competitive grade point average in recent years has been higher. 
Applicants with less than a 3.0 grade point average may be considered 
if they demonstrate strong motivation and aptitude, provided that 
spaces are available. 

Since they must have junior standing to be eligible to enter the 
College of Communications, students at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign are advised to register as freshmen and sopho- 
mores in the prejournalism curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and to follow a broad general education program. 
Students at other institutions should follow similar programs. 

Although there is no formal preadvertising or prejournalism pro- 
gram, a strongly recommended program for each college curriculum 
for the first two years is available in the college office. These programs 
include basic courses in economics, English, history, philosophy, 
sociology, and anthropology, as well as courses satisfying the 
University's general education requirements. Students who do not 
have a reasonable degree of typing ability should acquire this skill 
before entering the college, because it is desirable in all curricula. A 
basic knowledge of computer skills is also useful. 

Students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign should 
make arrangements at the college office to apply for an intra-college 
transfer early in the second semester of their sophomore year. Junior 
standing is necessary for students to take most courses offered by the 
College of Communications. 

Students completing their freshman and sophomore studies at 
institutions other than the University of Illinois are strongly advised 
to defer courses in advertising, journalism, and communications until 
enrolled in the College of Communications. Students must take all of 
their required communications courses in the College of Communica- 
tions. They may be permitted to transfer up to nine hours of elective 
communications courses taken elsewhere, provided that they take an 
equivalent number of additional hours in advanced social studies, 
arts, and sciences beyond the 20 semester hours required for gradua- 
tion from the college. 

The college does not recommend that students with more than 90 
hours enter any of its undergraduate programs. The programs are 
designed for completion within four semesters. In certain cases, it is 
possible to complete the curriculum requirements in three semesters 
if prerequisites in sequential courses can be met. The college does not 
accept a student who has already received a bachelor's degree as a 
candidate for a second bachelor's degree. Instead, it recommends that 
such a student enter one of its graduate programs. 

GRADUATION 

The college offers programs of study leading to bachelor of science 
degrees in advertising, journalism, and in media studies. To meet the 
degree requirements, all students must satisfy general University 
requirements as to registration, residence, scholarship, and fees. They 
also must complete the University general education requirements. 
All students must also fulfill the following general requirements of the 
College of Communications: 

— Complete a total of 124 semester hours of course credit. Basic 
physical education activity courses and basic courses in military, 
naval, or air force science may not be counted toward this total 
although such credits may be counted toward meeting the admis- 
sion requirement of 60 semester hours. No more than a total of 12 
hours earned in undergraduate open seminars (199 courses), in 
independent study courses outside the college, and in other experi- 
mental courses may be counted toward the degrees offered by the 
college. A student in the college may enroll in one such course for 
a maximum of four hours of credit in any semester with the consent 
of the head of the student's major department. The same policy is 
applied to credit for internships in fields other than communica- 
tions with the additional requirement that such courses must also 
be approved by the dean of the college. While the college encour- 
ages its students to hold internships in the communications field, 
particularly in the summer between the junior and senior years, it 



does not allow academic credit toward the degree for such experi- 
ence alone. Credit granted by other institutions for internships is 
not accepted. 

— Complete not less than 30 hours but not more than 36 hours in 
courses offered by the college in advertising, communications, and 
journalism. Those undergraduate courses cross-listed with adver- 
tising or journalism courses are considered college course offer- 
ings. Undergraduate communications courses cross-listed only 
with departments outside the college are not counted as college 
offerings, except COMM 322. 

— Complete not less than 20 hours in advanced (200- and 300-level) 
courses at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the 
social studies, arts, and sciences approved by the faculty. 

— Complete the specific requirements of one of the curricula offered 
by the college, as listed below. 

— Complete 90 hours of credit outside the college, of which 65 hours 
must be taken in the liberal arts and sciences. 

— Earn a grade point average of 2.0 (A = 4.0) in all courses presented 
for the degree. Earn a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all 
courses taken while registered in the college. Earn a cumulative 2.0 
grade point average for the 30-36 hour courses required for the 
major. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

To be graduated from the College of Communications, students must 
satisfy the University's general education requirements, which in- 
clude completion of the two-course composition requirement, a Quan- 
titative Reasoning requirement, six hours of Cultural Studies, and a 
minimum of six hours each in the humanities, social sciences, and 
natural sciences. Any substitution of courses must be approved by the 
dean of the college. 

The Campus Senate, the faculty General Education Board, and the 
colleges and departments are working to implement enhanced gen- 
eral education requirements. Thus, new students should confirm their 
general education requirements by consulting college and depart- 
mental offices, handbooks, or advisers. 

Special Programs 

EDMUND J. JAMES SCHOLARS 

The College of Communications does not have a college honors 
program. However, a student who transfers into the College of 
Communications from another college on the Urbana-Champaign 
campus and is a James Scholar in the previous college at the time of 
transfer will continue to be listed as a James Scholar in the College of 
Communications through the end of the first spring semester in the 
college. If the student has a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or 
above ( A = 4.0) at that time, he or she willbe certified as a James Scholar 
for the next academic year when his or her records will be reviewed for 
certification. Any student whose cumulative average falls below 3.5 
will not be certified and will be removed from the James Scholars 
listing. Designation as a James Scholar is available only to a student 
who was previously so designated. 

DEAN'S LIST 

To be eligible for Dean's List recognition for any semester, students 
must rank in the top 20 percent of their respective classes and must 
successfully complete 14 academic hours, of which at least 12 hours 
must be traditionally graded hours (excluding course work graded 
pass-fail, credit-no credit, satisfactory-unsatisfactory, excused, or de- 
ferred) and excluding grades and hours in basic physical education 
courses and religious foundation courses. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

For graduation with honors, a student must have been named to the 
Dean's List of the College of Communications for at least three 
semesters, must rank in the upper 20 percent of the student's gradu- 
ation class, and must have earned a minimum grade point average of 
3.5 or above in all courses taken after admission to the College of 
Communications. For graduation with high honors, a student must 
have been named to the Dean's List of the College of Communications 
for at least three semesters, must rank in the upper 10 percent of the 
student's graduation class, and must have earned a minimum grade 
point average of 3.7 in all courses taken after admission to the College 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



74 



of Communications. For graduation with highest honors, a student 
must have been named to the Dean's List of the College of Communi- 
cations for at least three semesters, must rank in the upper 5 percent 
of the student's graduation class, and must have earned a minimum 
grade point average of 3.8 or above in all courses taken after admission 
to the College of Communications. 

KAPPA TAU ALPHA 

Each year, scholastically high-ranking undergraduate and graduate 
students in the College of Communications are considered for mem- 
bership in Kappa Tau Alpha, national honorary society in journalism 
and communications. The society was founded to recognize and 
promote scholarship in advertising, journalism, broadcasting, and 
media studies. 

Curricula 



CURRICULUM IN ADVERTISING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Advertising 

Department of Advertising 
103 Gregory Hall 
810 South Wright 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-1602 

To be graduated from the advertising curriculum, a student must 
meet the general University and college requirements for the degree 
and must complete the following courses: 

HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
6 



30 

3-6 

6 

3 

7-8 



REQUIRED COURSES 

ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 
ADV 381 — Advertising Research Methods 
ADV 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy and Tactics 
ADV 383 — Advertising Media Strategy and Tactics 
ADV 391 — Advertising Management: Planning 
ADV 392 — Advertising Management: Strategy and Tactics 
ADV 393 — Advertising in Contemporary Society 
A minimum of two courses from this list: 
JOURN 217 — History of Communications 
JOURN 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 
JOURN 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 
JOURN 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic 

Society 
JOURN 241 — Law and Communications 
JOURN 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 
Advertising, journalism, or communications electives (no 
more than 9 hours) 
Total (no more than 36) 

A specified course or courses in statistical methods 1 
ECON 102 and 103 — Micro- and Macroeconomic Principles 
B ADM 202— Principles of Marketing 2 
Two of the following: 

PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 

SOC 100 — Introduction to Sociology 

ANTH 103 — Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 



1. Currently acceptable courses: EDPSY 390; ECON 172, 173; PSYCH 235; STAT 100; 
SOC 185; MATH 161; and AGRON 340. 

2. These courses may be credited toward the college requirement of 20 hours of 
advanced social studies, arts, and sciences. 



CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism 

Department of Journalism 
120A Gregory Hall 
810 South Wright Street 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-0709 

NEWS-EDITORIAL SEQUENCE 

To be graduated from the news-editorial sequence of the Department 
of Journalism, a student mu; l meet the general University and college 
requirements for the degree and must complete the following courses: 



HOURS 

3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 



30 
36 



REQUIRED COURSES 

JOURN 150 — Introduction to Journalism 

JOURN 350— Reporting, I 

JOURN 360— Graphic Arts 

JOURN 370— News Editing 

JOURN 380— Reporting, II 

JOURN 241 — Law and Communications 

A minimum of one course from the following: 
JOURN 217 — History of Communications 
JOURN 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 
JOURN 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 
JOURN 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic 

Society 
JOURN 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 1 

Advertising, journalism, or communications electives (no 

more than 11 hours) 

Total (no more than 36) 

At least 6 hours of credit in each of the following areas: 

economics, English or American literature, history, 

philosophy, political science, and sociology or anthropology 1 



1. Courses taken in these fields to fulfill the college requirement of 20 hours of 
advanced social studies, arts, and sciences may be used toward fulfilling the 
departmental requirements, as may lower-division courses or sequences in these 
fields taken any rime during the student's four years. Undergraduate seminar courses 
(199) and hours earned through CLEP may not be used to fulfill these departmental 
requirements. 



BROADCAST JOURNALISM SEQUENCE 

To be graduated from the broadcast journalism sequence of the 
Department of Journalism, a student must meet the general Univer- 
sity and college requirements for a degree and must complete the 
following courses: 

HOURS 

3 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 



30 
36 



REQUIRED COURSES 

JOURN 150 — Introduction to Journalism 

JOURN 350— Reporting, I 

JOURN 362— Broadcast News Production 

JOURN 372— Broadcast News Writing and Gathering 

JOURN 382— Broadcast News Editing 

JOURN 241 — Law and Communications 

A minimum of one course from the following: 
JOURN 217 — History of Communications 
JOURN 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 
JOURN 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 
JOURN 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic 

Society 
JOURN 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 1 

Advertising, journalism, or communications electives (no 

more than 11 hours ) 

Total (no more than 36) 

At least 6 hours of credit in each of six of the following areas: 

economics, English or American literature, history, natural 

science, philosophy, political science, and sociology or 

anthropology 1 

At least four courses in each of two department-approved 

areas of specialization 1 



1. Courses taken in these areas to fulfill the college requirement of 20 hours of 
advanced social studies, arts, and sciences may be used toward fulfilling these 
departmental requirements, as may lower-division courses or sequences in these areas 
taken any time during the student's four years. Natural science may be either life 
science or physical science, but not mathematics, to satisfy this departmental 
requirement. Besides the above seven areas, specializations may include other areas, 
such as agricultural economics, labor relations, urban planning, finance, and speech 
communication. Undergraduate seminar courses (199), independent study courses, 
and hours earned through CLEP may not be used to fulfill any of these departmental 
requirements. 

CURRICULUM IN MEDIA STUDIES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Media Studies 

Media Studies Program 
222B Armory 
505 East Armory Avenue 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-1549 

To be graduated from the media studies curriculum, a student must 
meet the general University and college requirements for the degree 
and must complete the following courses: 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

75 



HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

3 COMM 101— Social and Cultural Foundations of Mass 

Media 1 
3 COMM 217 — History of Communications 

3 COMM 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 

3 COMM 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic Society 

3 COMM 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 

3 COMM 264 — Economic Structure of Communications 

3 COMM 310— Media Ethics 

12 College of Communications electives from the list below 

At least four elective courses totaling at least 12 hours up to a 
maximum of six courses totaling no more than 18 hours must 
be chosen from the following list: 

ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 

ADV 309— Public Relations 

COMM 218 — Communications and Public Opinion 

COMM 241 — Law and Communications 

COMM 261 — American Broadcasting and 

Telecommunications 
COMM 310— Media Ethics 
COMM 322— Politics and the Media 
COMM 366 — Film as Business 
JOURN 223— Photo-journalism 
JOURN 350— Reporting, I 

COMM 361 — Telecommunications Programming 
COMM 362 — Telecommunications Management 
COMM 368 — Legal and Policy Issues in 
Telecommunications 
30 Total 

20 At least 20 hours of advanced (200- and 300-level) credits in 

one or two areas outside of the College of Communications, 
such as economics, management, political science, sociology, 
psychology, literature, philosophy, physics, or engineering 2 

1. Strongly recommended, but hours do not count toward the 30 hours for the major. 

2. Fulfills the college requirement of 20 hours of advanced level social studies, arts, 
and sciences. 



College of Education 



110 Education Building 
1310 South Sixth Street 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-2800 

The College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign offers undergraduate degree programs in two of the six 
departments within the college. The departments that offer under- 
graduate degree programs, and the programs offered by each, are 
described below. 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction offers degree 
programs in elementary education and early childhood education 
and provides the supporting course work for the teacher education 
minor in secondary education. Students who satisfactorily complete 
the degree program in elementary education are eligible for the 
University's recommendation for Illinois certification in grades kin- 
dergarten through nine. The early childhood education degree pro- 
gram prepares students for recommendation for Illinois early child- 
hood certification (birth through grade three). Only students who 
have earned at least 60 semester hours are considered for admission 
to the elementary or early childhood curricula. The teacher education 
minor in secondary education is a component of the teaching option 
within the following Sciences and Letters majors in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences: biology, chemistry, English, geology, his- 
tory, mathematics, physics, and speech. Students who satisfactorily 
complete an LAS degree in one of these areas and the teacher educa- 
tion minor in secondary education are eligible for the University's 
recommendation for Illinois certification in grades six through twelve. 
For additional information regarding Liberal Arts and Sciences re- 
quirements, see the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences section 
elsewhere in this catalog. Additional information regarding the teacher 
education minor in secondary education may be found at the end of 
the College of Education's section. 

The Department of Special Education offers an undergraduate 
degree program that prepares students to teach persons with moder- 
ate to severe disabilities. Students who satisfactorily complete the 
degree program in special education are eligible for the University's 



recommendation for Illinois certification in grades kindergarten 
through twelve with an endorsement in trainable mentally handi- 
capped. This program is able to accommodate only a small number of 
juniors and seniors. Applicants to this program must complete special 
admission procedures. 

In addition to these degree programs, a two-year curriculum in the 
College of Education, called education general, is available to students 
who have completed less than 60 semester hours of credit. It is 
designed to accommodate students admitted as freshmen who are 
uncertain about the specific degree programs they wish to pursue in 
the College of Education and who need to complete the 60 hours 
required for admission to all curricula in the college. 

In addition to offering undergraduate degree programs in educa- 
tion, the College of Education, under the auspices of the Council on 
Teacher Education, cooperates with four other undergraduate col- 
leges on the Urbana-Champaign campus to provide courses in profes- 
sional education to undergraduate students who are preparing for 
careers in teaching and special educational services. 

The College of Education also offers graduate degree programs. 
Detailed information concerning graduate programs in education 
may be obtained by referring to the College of Education Graduate 
Programs Handbook available in 120 Education Building. 

Requirements 

ADMISSION 

All freshmen are admitted to the education general curriculum. Junior 
standing, at least 60 semester hours of baccalaureate-oriented course 
work attained at an accredited institution of higher learning, is re- 
quired for admission to the programs in special education, elementary 
education, early childhood education and the teacher education mi- 
nor in secondary education. 

Admission to the College of Education at any level (freshmen, 
transfers from other institutions, or on-campus transfers from other 
colleges) is competitive. Freshmen must complete the University's 
minimum high school subject pattern described in the undergraduate 
admissions section elsewhere in this catalog. In addition, freshman 
applications are evaluated for admission based on ACT/SAT scores 
and the high school percentile rank achieved at the conclusion of the 
junior year in high school. Admission for transfer from other institu- 
tions and for on-campus transfer is based on the following criteria: the 
cumulative and UIUC grade point average(s), grades earned in the 
course work of the intended major, completion of required course 
pattern, the quality of the applicant's background statement, and 
space availability in the desired curriculum. At the time of publica- 
tion, the minimum grade point average for transfer admission was 3. 1 . 
A student whose cumulative average is below the minimum criteria 
may be considered individually, on a petition basis, if enrollment 
vacancies exist in the curriculum to which the student is seeking 
admission and if a compelling rationale is presented. 

GRADUATION 

Each undergraduate student in the College of Education must meet 
the University requirements and the requirements of the Council on 
Teacher Education for graduation; both sets of requirements are 
found elsewhere in this catalog. Students in all curricula must meet the 
course and academic credit requirements of their curricula with 
satisfactory scholastic averages. Student teaching is required of all 
undergraduates in teacher education and must be completed at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Students in need of additional information concerning regulations 
and requirements of the College of Education should consult their 
academic advisers or the associate dean for instructional programs in 
the College of Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
110 Education Building, 1310 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

For additional requirements pertaining to certification, please 
refer to the Council on Teacher Education section elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

At the time of publication, the University general education require- 
ments were under revision. Prospective and new students should 
confirm their general education requirements by consulting the col- 
lege admissions/records officer. 

In order to meet the University's current requirements in general 
education, each candidate for a degree from the College of Education 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



76 



must complete Composition I; Composition II; Quantitative Reason- 
ing I; Cultural Studies: Western/Comparative Cultures; Cultural 
Studies: Non-Western/U.S. Minority Cultures; and six hours in each 
of the following areas: Humanities/ Arts, Social/Behavioral Sciences, 
and Natural Sciences/Technology. In most teacher education cur- 
ricula, additional credit in these areas is required. These requirements 
are generally fulfilled by course work offered by the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. Students must select their courses for general 
education from the Council on Teacher Education list of approved 
courses, which is available from academic advisers and the Instruc- 
tional Programs Office. 

Special Programs 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Eligibility for graduation with honors is established on the fulfillment 
of residence and scholastic requirements. Residence requirements for 
graduation with honors are fulfilled under any one of the following 
conditions: 

— Meeting University residence requirements for graduation and 
having earned at least 54 of the final 60 semester hours of credit in 
residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Course credit that is 
not included in the grade point average does not count toward the 
residence requirement. 

— Obtaining waiver of University residence requirements by peti- 
tion to the Instructional Programs Office, 110 Education Building, and 
having earned at least 54 of the last 60 semester hours of credit, 
excluding credit for courses that are not included in computation of 
the grade point average, through resident study at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. 

— Meeting University residence requirements and having completed 
all but 15 hours in resident study at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

— Having completed the first 90 semester hours in residence and all 
or part of the senior year in an approved program at another institu- 
tion for a University of Illinois degree. 

A student who achieves the required scholastic average in all 
educadon courses and in all work presented for graduation (exclud- 
ing credit for courses not included in the computation of the grade 
point average), with professional education and cumulative averages 
computed separately, may be recommended for honors as follows: 
honors, minimum professional education and cumulative grade point 
averages of 3.5; high honors, minimum professional education and 
cumulative grade point averages of 3.75; highest honors, minimum 
professional education and cumulative grade point averages of 3.75 
and rank within the top 5 percent of those education students gradu- 
ating within the same period. (At the time of publication, the criteria 
for earning honors at graduation were under review.) 

EDMUND J. JAMES SCHOLARS 

The James Scholar program is a University-wide honors program 
established to encourage undergraduate research and independent 
study and to foster scholarly endeavors. As a James Scholar, students 
are entitled to certain academic privileges, including access to the 
"stacks" in the library, priority assignment of registration time, and 
official recognition on the University of Illinois transcript. 

The college establishes the minimum criteria for participation in 
the program and invites eligible students to participate. Selection 
criteria for beginning freshmen is based on a selection index deter- 
mined at the time of admission which combines the high school 
percentile rank and the student's ACT composite. Transfer and con- 
tinuing students must have achieved at least a 3.5 cumulative and 
UIUC grade point average to participate. 

Students are certified as James Scholars by the college on a yearly 
basis. To qualify for this certification, the student must complete one 
honors course each semester and maintain a 3.5 UIUC and cumulative 
grade point average. More information concerning the James Scholar 
program can be found elsewhere in this catalog. 



Curricula 



EDUCATION GENERAL 



Education general is a two-year curriculum available to students in 
the College of Education who have completed less than 60 semester 
hours of credit. It has been designed to accommodate students who 
are uncertain about the specific degree programs they wish to enter in 
the College of Education and students who have not completed the 60 
hours required to qualify for admission to all curricula in the college. 
Students in education general are required to pursue a program of 
study that includes the course requirements common to all under- 
graduate programs in the College of Education and the requirements 
for continuation established by the University and the College of 
Education. In order to obtain a bachelor's degree, a student must 
transfer out of education general prior to or during the term in which 
the student will complete his or her 48th semester hour. 

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


3-4 


RHET 105 or 108, OR SPCOM 111 


4 


PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 


3 


Science elective 


3 


POL S 150 — American Government: Organization and Powers 


13-14 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


Speech performance course or SPCOM 112 


2-3 


Health and physical development 


3 


Science elective 


3-4 


HIST 150/151, 152/153, 260, 261, or 262 


3-4 


Quantitative Reasoning I 


14-17 


Total 


HOURS 


THIRD SEMESTER 


3 


MUSIC 133 or humanities elective 


3 


EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 


3 


English or American literature 


3 


Science elective 


3 


GEOG 104, 110, 210 or social science elective 


15 


Total 


HOURS 


FOURTH SEMESTER 


3 


ART&D 140 or humanities elective 


3 


EDPSY 236— Child Development for Elementary Teachers, or 




PSYCH 216— Child Psychology 


3-4 


Laboratory science elective 


3 


Composition II 


3-4 


MATH 203 or SPED 117 


15-17 


Total 


CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION' 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood 
Education 

This program focuses on preparing teachers for preschool, kindergar- 
ten, and the early primary grades (one through three) of the elemen- 
tary school. Graduates of the program qualify for the early childhood 
certificate. A minimum of 128 semester hours of credit, excluding 
basic military science, is necessary for graduation. 

For teacher education certification requirements applicable to all 
curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education section elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All courses must be selected from the council list of approved courses 
for general education. 

HOURS COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

6-7 RHET 105 or 108 and a speech performance elective or 

SPCOM 111 and 112 
0-3 Composition II 

6-10 Total 

HOURS MATHEMATICS/SCIENCE 2 

6-8 Biological science 

6-8 Physical science (mathematics not acceptable) 

4 MATH 203— Theory of Arithmetic 

3 MATH 117 — Experimental Mathematics (or another course 

satisfying Quantitative Reasoning I) 

19-23 Total 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



77 



HOURS HUMANITIES 1 

6 Literature 

3 MUSIC 130 or 133— Introduction to the Art of Music or 

Introduction to World Music 

3 ART&D 140 — Introduction to Art 
12 Total 

HOURS AMERICAN HISTORY 

3-4 Choose from: 

HIST 150— Composition II/History of the United States to 

1877 
HIST 151— History of the United States to 1877 
HIST 152— History of the United States, 1877 to the Present 
HIST 153— Composition II/History of the United States, 

1877 to the Present 
HIST 260— Colonial Beginnings and Early United States 

History to 1815 
HIST 261— The United States in the Nineteenth Century 
HIST 262— The United States in the Twentieth Century 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 3 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 
3 POL S 150 — American Government 

3-4 Social sciences elective 

10-11 Total 

HOURS HEALTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

2 Health and physical development 

2 Total 

HOURS AREA OF CONCENTRATION 3 

18 Additional study in one academic discipline selected from the 

categories of mathematics, science, social sciences, or 
humanities and including 9 semester hours of course work at 
the 200 level or above. (Consult an adviser for the list of 
approved disciplines.) 

1. At the time of publication, this program was being revised. 

2. At least one science course must be a laboratory course. 

3. At least one 3-semester-hour course in humanities, social sciences, or the area of 
concentration must be taken in non-Western culture. 



HOURS 

3 
3 
5 
3 



3 

2 

2 



56 

128 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

EDPSY 236 — Child Development for Elementary Teachers 

C & 1 320 — Foundations of Early Childhood Education 

C & 1 321 — Principles and Practices in Early Childhood 

Education 

Choose one from: 

C & 1 322 — Parent Involvement Techniques for Teachers 
ANTH/HDFS 210— Comparative Family Organization 
HDFS 310 — Contemporary American Family 
SP ED 338— Families of Children with Special Needs 
ED PR 232 — Educational Practice in Elementary Education 
SPSHS 383 — Development of Spoken Language 
SP ED 308 — Teaching Students with Learning and Behavior 
Problems in the Regular Classroom, or SP ED 365 — 
Intervention Issues and Practices with Young Children with 
Disabilities 

ED PR 238— Educational Practice for Special Fields in 
Elementary Schools (Prekindergarten Student Teaching) 
C & 1 330* — Principles and Practices in Mathematics 
Education 

C & 1 340* — Principles and Practices in Science Education 
C & I 345* — Principles and Practices in Social Studies 
Education 

C & I 360* — Principles and Practices in Language Arts 
Education 

C & I 367 — Principles and Practices in Teaching Literature to 
Children and Youth 

C & I 370* — Principles and Practices in Reading Education 
ARTED 203— Art in the Elementary Grades 
Music 241 — Music for Elementary Teachers 
ED PR 150 — School and Community Experiences 
Total 

TOTAL minimum hours, including general education and 
professional education credits 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL TEACHING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

This program prepares teachers for grades kindergarten through 
nine. A minimum of 124 semester hours, excluding basic military 
science, is necessary for graduation. Two prerequisite courses must be 
completed before admission to Elementary Education: Educational 
Psychology 236 and Educational Policy Studies 201. Students who are 
admitted to Elementary Education in the spring of their sophomore 
year may be able to complete the requirements for the bachelor's 
degree in four years. Students who are admitted to Elementary 
Education in the spring of their junior year will need five years to 
satisfy the requirements for teacher certification. Those students, 
however, may be able to petition to count as graduate credit up to 4 
units of course credit in excess of the minimum required for the 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education degree. Students are 
advised that additional course work must be completed to teach 
departmentalized subjects in middle grades 5 through 8. Consult the 
certification officer in 130 Education Building for additional informa- 
tion. 

For teacher education certification requirements applicable to all 
curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education section elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All courses must be selected from the Council on Teacher Education 
list of approved courses for general education. 

COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

RHET 105 or RHET 108 and a speech performance elective, or 

SPCOM 111 and 112 

Composition II 

Total 

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 1 

Biological science 

Physical science (mathematics not acceptable) 

MATH 203— Theory of Arithmetic 

MATH 117 — Experimental Mathematics (or another course 

satisfying Quantitative Reasoning I) 

Total 



*Early childhood education students must enroll in the early childhood section of this 
course. 



HOURS 

6-7 

0-3 
6-10 

HOURS 

6-8 
6-8 
4 
3 

19-23 

HOURS HUMANITIES 2 

6 Literature (including 3 hours of English or American 

literature) 
3 ART&D 140 — Introduction to Art 

3 Elective 
12 Total 

HOURS AMERICAN HISTORY 

3-4 Choose from: 

HIST 150— Composition II/History of the United States to 

1877 
HIST 151— History of the United States to 1877 
HIST 152— History of the United States, 1877 to the Present 
HIST 153— Composition II/History of the United States, 

1877 to the Present 
HIST 260 — Colonial Beginnings and Early United States 

History to 1815 
HIST 261— The United States in the Nineteenth Century 
HIST 262— The United States in the Twentieth Century 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 

4 PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 
3 POL S 150 — American Government 

3-4 GEOG 104, 110, or 210— Cultural geography 

10-11 Total 

HOURS HEALTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

3 KINES 268— Children's Movement 

3 Total 

HOURS AREA OF CONCENTRATION 2 

18 Additional study in one academic discipline selected from the 

categories of mathematics, science, social sciences, or 
humanities and including 9 semester hours of course work at 
the 200 level or above. (Consult an adviser for the list of 
approved disciplines.) 



1. At least one science course must be a laboratory course. 

2. At least one 3-semester-hour course in humanities or the area of concentration must 
be taken in non-Western culture. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



78 



HOURS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

EDPSY 236 — Child Development for Elementary Teachers 

2 MUSIC 241 — Music for Elementary Teachers 

2 ARTED 203 — Art in the Elementary Grades 

1 ED PR 150 — School and Community Experiences 

8 ED PR 232 — Educational Practice in Elementary Education 

1 SP ED 205 — Introduction to Serving Students with Special 
Needs 

2 SP ED 305 — Teaching Students with Special Needs in the 
Regular Classroom 

1 C & I 235 — Content Area Applications of Educational 

Technology 

1 C & I 305 — Introduction to Teaching Elementary Age 
Children 

4 C & I 306 — Theory and Practice in Elementary School 

Teaching, I 

2 C & I 307 — Theory and Practice in Elementary School 
Teaching, II 

4 C & I 331 — Teaching Elementary Mathematics 

2 C & I 332 — An Investigative Approach to Elementary 
Mathematics Instruction 

1 C & I 347 — Issues and Practices in Addressing Diversity in 
Elementary Education 

3 C & I 348— Teaching Elementary Social Studies 

2 C & I 350 — Teaching Elementary Science, I 

2 C & I 351 — Teaching Elementary Science, II 

3 C & I 367 — Principles and Practices in Teaching Literature to 
Children and Youth 

4 C & I 375 — Teaching Elementary Reading and Language 
Arts, I 

2 C & I 376 — Teaching Elementary Reading and Language 
Arts, II 

53 Total 

124-134 Total minimum hours, including general education and 

professional education credits 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO TEACHING PERSONS 
WITH MODERATE AND SEVERE DISABILITIES 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Special Education 

This two-year curriculum is designed to prepare individuals to teach 
students with moderate and severe disabilities. An applicant must 
have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (A = 4.0), have 
prior experience 1 with moderately and severely disabled persons, and 
have attained junior standing (at least 60 semester hours of baccalau- 
reate credit) upon enrollment in the program. A minimum of 124 
hours of credit, excluding basic military science, is required for 
graduation. 

To allow completion of degree requirements within two years, 
applicants must have earned 60 hours and must have fulfilled all or 
most of the following general education and preferably some of the 
professional education requirements prior to enrollment. Admission 
is made by formal application during the spring semester of the 
sophomore year. 

For teacher education certification requirements applicable to all 
curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education section elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All courses must appear on the Council on Teacher Education list of 
approved courses. 

HOURS COMMUNICATION SKILLS 

6-7 RHET 105 or 108 and a speech performance elective, or 

SPCOM 111 and 112 
0-3 Composition II 

6-10 Total 

HOURS MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 2 

3 Mathematics 

6 Biological science 

6 Physical science 

15 Total 

HOURS HUMANITIES' 

3-4 American history 

3 English or American literature 

9 Electives 
15-16 Total 

HOURS SOCIAL SCIENCES 1 

3 POL SI 50 — American Government 



4 
3 
6 
16 

HOURS 

2 
2 

HOURS 

60 



PSYCH 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or equivalent 

PSYCH 216— Child Psychology 

Electives 

Total 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

Health and physical development 
Total 

GENERAL EDUCATION ELECTIVES 

To yield this total 



1. Applicants may contact the Departmentof Special Education for further information, 
if needed, on the prior experience requirement. 

2. At least one science course must be a laboratory course. 

3. At least one 3-semester-hour course in humanities or social sciences must be taken 
in non-Western culture. 

HOURS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

3 EPS 201, 311, or 312— History and philosophy of education 

4 ED PR 150, Section MSH— School and Community 
Experiences 

6 ED PR 220, Section MSH, secondary focus— Educational 

Practice in the Education of Exceptional Children 

4 EDPSY 363— Instructional Design 

4 SP ED 336 — Systematic Instruction for Students with Special 

Needs 

21 Total 

HOURS SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS 

3 SP ED 332— Characteristics and Methods of Educating 

Students with Multiple Disabilities 
3 SPSHS 383 — Development of Spoken Language 

3-4 SPSHS 386— Language Disorders in Children, or SP ED 360— 

Communications Strategies for Persons with Severe 

Intellectual and/or Physical Disabilities 
8 ED PR 220, Section MSH, elementary focus— Educational 

Practice in the Education of Exceptional Children 
3 SP ED 117— Exceptional Children 

3 SP ED 322— Introduction to Mental Retardation 

2 SP ED 324 — Tests and Measurements in Special Education 

3 SP ED 335 — Behavior Analysis for Teachers: Applications 
with Exceptional Individuals 

4 SP ED 337 — Curriculum Development and Classroom 
Organization for Students with Moderate and Severe 
Handicaps 

3 SP ED 338— Families of Children with Special Needs 

3 SP ED 345 — Transitional Planning and Vocational Training 

for Individuals with Disabilities 
38-39 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

124 To yield this total (with the above requirements) 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ADULT AND 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 

The purpose of this minor is to offer students a course of study to 
increase their competence as teachers of adults and to open avenues 
for expanded career options for those planning to be teachers. This is 
not a field in which one can be certified for elementary or secondary 
teaching in Illinois. Students should consult with the continuing 
education adviser, 333 Education Building, before electing to take this 
minor. 



HOURS 

4 
4 
4 
6 



18 



REQUIRED COURSES 

EOL 362 — Adult Learning and Development 

EOL 380 — Continuing Education General Seminar 

EOL 363 — Instructional Design 

Electives (for the selection of electives, students must have 

prior approval of the adult and continuing education adviser, 

333 Education Building) 

Total 



APPROVED NON-TEACHING MINOR 



INSTRUCTIONAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS 1 

A minimum of 18 hours, including the following, is required. 

HOURS COMPUTER SCIENCE 

3-4 C S 101 and 110; 105, or 125 — Introduction to computer 

programming 
2-3 C S 232 or 300 — Advanced or machine-level programming 

3 Advanced computer science elective 2 

8-10 Total 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



79 



HOURS INSTRUCTIONAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS 

4 C & I 335 — Computer-Assisted Instruction 

2-4 C & I 336; C & I 399, sections AC1, AC2, or AC3; HUMAN 382; 

or MUSIC 210 — Instructional applications in subject fields 
3 C & 1 199 — Practicum in Instructional Applications 

9-11 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVE 

3 C & I 249— A thesis project 

20-24 Total 

Students enrolled in this minor may do practice teaching in schools 
having computer resources for instructional applications. 



1. This is not a subject field to be taught but is an additional resource to assist the 
teacher in the instruction of a teacher education major. Please consult an adviser. 

2. A computer science elective chosen from among the general areas of programming, 
numerical analyses, structure and logic, theory of computation, hardware, and 
applications of computing. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN SECONDARY SCHOOL 
TEACHING 

This minor is a component of the teaching option within the following 
Science and Letters majors: biology, chemistry, English, geology, 
history, mathematics, physics, and speech. For admission to the 
teaching option within those majors, see the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences section elsewhere in this catalog. 

Transfer into the teaching option within a major can be made only 
by students who have received approval to complete the minor in 
education. Approval for the minor in education is gained by success- 
ful application to the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the 
College of Education, upon recommendation by the subject area 
committees of the Council on Teacher Education. 

Two prerequisite courses must be completed before transfer to the 
teaching option in any major: Educational Psychology 21 1 and Educa- 
tional Policy Studies 201. Additionally, each major stipulates other 
prerequisite courses that must be completed before admission to the 
teaching option. Interested students should see the academic advisers 
in the major for information on prerequisite courses. 

Some students will be able to complete all the prerequisite courses 
for transfer into the teaching option of their major by the spring of their 
sophomore year; those students may be able to complete the require- 
ments for the bachelor's degree in LAS, as well as the minor in 
education and all other requirements for teacher certification in four 
years. 

Students who establish eligibility to transfer into the teaching 
option of their major in the spring of their junior year will need five 
years to satisfy the requirements for teacher certification. Those stu- 
dents, however, may be able to petition to count as graduate credit up 
to 15 hours of course credit in excess of the minimum required for the 
Liberal Arts and Sciences bachelor's degree. 



HOURS 
1 

3 
3 
3 
4 

1 

3 
3 
2 
2 
1 



36 



REQUIRED COURSES 

C & 1 235 — Content Area Applications of 

Educational Technology 

C & 1 301 — Introduction to Teaching in a Diverse Society 

C & I 302— Teaching Diverse Middle Grade Students 

C & I 303 — Teaching Diverse Senior High School Students 

C & I 304 — Teaching and Assessing Secondary School 

Students 1 

EOL 350 — Legal and Professional Issues for Teachers 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

EDPSY 320— Early Adolescent Development 

EDPSY 391 — Assessment Issues for Classroom Teachers 

SP ED 205 — Introduction to Serving Students with Special 

Needs 

SP ED 305 — Teaching Students with Special Needs in the 

Regular Classroom 

ED PR 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 

Total 



1. Students in the Speech Teaching option may substitute SPCOM 247 for C & I 304. 

Note: In order for any conversion to graduate credit to be approved, the converted 
credit must be in excess of the minimum requirements for the bachelor's degree in 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the student must be admitted to the master's program 
in Curriculum and Instruction and to the Graduate College. 



College of Engineering 



Associate Dean for Academic Programs 

315 Ceramics Building 

105 South Goodwin Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-2280 

URL: http://www.engr.uiuc.edu/ 

The College of Engineering prepares men and women for professional 
careers in engineering and related positions in industry, commerce, 
education, and government. The goal is to prepare graduates to begin 
the practice of engineering or to continue their formal education at a 
graduate school of their choice. This preparation enables graduates to 
make significant contributions in their chosen fields while at the same 
time recognizing their responsibilities to society. The curricular pro- 
grams and experiences are intended to instill in students the attitudes, 
values, vision, and training that will prepare them for lifetimes of 
continued learning and leadership in engineering and other fields. 

The college provides training in the mathematical and physical 
sciences and their application to a broad spectrum of technological 
and social requirements of society. The engineering curricula, al- 
though widely varied and specialized, are built on a general founda- 
tion of scientific theory applicable to many different fields. Work in the 
classroom and laboratory is brought into sharper focus by practical 
problems that the student solves by methods similar to those of 
practicing engineers. Engineering design experience is introduced 
early in the curriculum, is integrated throughout, and culminates in a 
major design project experience in the senior year. 

Although each student pursues a curriculum chosen to meet 
individual career goals, all students take certain common courses. 
Basic courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, rhetoric, and com- 
puter science are required in the first two years. The scientific and 
technical portion of the majors provides the rudimentary develop- 
ment of technical skills, the engineering method of solving problems 
in practice, an understanding of values and costs, an understanding of 
the ethical characteristics of the engineering profession and practice, 
a sensitivity to the socially related technical problems that confront the 
profession, an understanding of the engineer's responsibility to pro- 
tect occupational and public health and safety, and the ability and 
emphasis for mamtaining professional competence through lifelong 
learning. Although the curricula are progressively specialized in the 
third and fourth years, each student is required to take some courses 
outside his or her chosen field. 

Nontechnical courses are included in each curriculum; they may 
be required or elective. Many nontechnical courses satisfy the broad 
objectives of the humanities and social sciences requirements of the 
engineering curricula, thus making the student keenly aware of the 
urgent problems of society and developing a deeper appreciation of 
human cultural achievements. The humanities and social sciences 
courses are usually drawn from the liberal arts and sciences, econom- 
ics, and approved courses in fine and applied arts. A student who 
desires a broader cultural background should consider a combined 
engineering-liberal arts and sciences program. 

The Grainger Engineering Library Information Center is a major 
resource center for students in all curricula. State-of-the-art resources 
include a digital imaging lab, computer and multimedia lab, instruc- 
tional services lab, information retrieval research lab, and high-tech 
classrooms. It also contains the reference books, periodicals, catalogs, 
and technical publications that students need constantly and provides 
materials for general reading and private research. 

Departments and Curricula 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Aeronautical 
and Astronautical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineer- 
ing, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Gen- 
eral Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical and 
Industrial Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Physics, and Theoreti- 
cal and Applied Mechanics. The undergraduate curricula described 
later in this section are administered by these units. The work in 
chemical engineering is administered by the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. The curriculum in agricultural engineering is adminis- 
tered jointly by the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environ- 
mental Sciences and the College of Engineering. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



80 



The listing by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Tech- 
nology of the programs of the College of Engineering, required bv the 
Engineering Accreditation Commission, is Aeronautical and Astro- 
nautical Engineering bdC [1950]'; Agricultural Engineering bdC [1950] 
Ceramic Engineering bdC [1936]; Chemical Engineering bdC [1936] 
Civil Engineering bdC [1936]; Computer Engineering bdC [1978] 
Electrical Engineering bdC [1936]; Engineering Mechanics bdC [1960] 
General Engineering bdC [1936]; Industrial Engineering bdC [1960] 
Materials Science and Engineering bC [1996]; Mechanical Engineering 
bdC [1936]; and Nuclear Engineering bdC [1978]. 

Each student entering the College of Engineering declares his or 
her choice of a curriculum. All first-year students follow the common 
program for freshmen shown here. 



'b = bachelor's degree, basic-level accreditation; d = day; C = co-op feature meeting 
special requirements of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 
criteria 

Requirements 



ENTERING FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Students seeking admission to the College of Engineering who are 
recent high school graduates or who have earned fewer than 12 
semester hours of credit at other collegiate institutions are classified as 
new freshmen and must meet the entrance requirements to the Col- 
lege of Engineering that are specified for new freshmen. Students are 
admitted to the college on a best-qualified basis as determined by ACT 
composite scores and high school percentile ranks supplied on high 
school transcripts. 

Although new freshmen take a common, or similar, program 
(shown below), they are asked to choose a curriculum in which they 
wish to study. A freshman usually can change the curriculum of study 
during the freshman year. Some restrictions apply when differential 
admission procedures are used. Because the program of study is 
essentially the same for all freshman students, such changes can be 
made without loss of credit toward graduation. 

The advanced Mathematics Placement Test and Chemistry Place- 
ment Test are required of all freshman students entering the College 
of Engineering. They are urged to take the examination during the 
spring testing period before enrollment. Proficiency exams are avail- 
able in chemistry and mathematics. A student with advanced place- 
ment credit in mathematics, chemistry, or physics will receive credit 
toward graduation and will be placed in advanced course work 
consistent with academic preparation. 



HOURS 


COMMON FIRST-YEAR PROGRAM 




0-4 
6-8 
8-10 


Engineering lecture 
Introductory engineering course 
Chemistry 1 
Mathematics 2 


4 

4 


Physics 
Rhetoric 


0-6 
3-6 


Engineering electives 
Electives 


31-36 


Total 



1. The normal freshman chemistry sequence is CHEM 101/105 and CHEM 102/106. 

2. Entering freshmen who do not pass the Mathematics Placement Test will take 
MATH 112 and MATH 114 or 116. 

TRANSFER STUDENT ADMISSION 

The College of Engineering admits qualified transfer students from 
both community and four-year colleges and has worked closely with 
these schools in Illinois to implement coordinated engineering pro- 
grams. 

Students may complete the first two years of study in other 
accredited institutions and transfer to the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign with little or no loss of credit, provided that they 
follow the proper program. A suggested list of courses that should be 
completed in the first two years before transferring is given below. A 
range of hours is given in each of these course work areas, because the 
major concern is that students have an adequate coverage of basic 
subject matter rather than specific numbers of hours in given areas. 
Ranges are given applicable to both quarter-hour and semester-hour 
systems. 



HOURS 


HOURS 


10-15 


6-10 


15-18 


10-12 


6-9 


4-6 


20-24 


15-17 


16-20 


12-14 


8-10 


6 


4-6 


3-4 


3-4 


2-3 


3-6 


2-3 


3-4 


3 


QUARTER 


SEMESTER 


HOURS 


HOURS 


9-27 


6-18 



RANGE OF HOURS 

QUARTER SEMESTER SUGGESTED COORDINATED 

ENGINEERING COURSES 

Freshman chemistry 
General physics (taught using calculus) 
English (rhetoric and composition) 
Mathematics (total mathematics credits) 
Calculus or calculus and analytic 
geometry 

Differential equations, linear algebra 
Engineering graphics (mechanical 
drawing and/or descriptive geometry) 
Applied mechanics — statics 
Applied mechanics — dynamics 
Computer science (programming) 

OTHER COURSES 

Social sciences and humanities 

Students should complete as many of the suggested courses as 
possible and select additional courses from those in the Other Courses 
list above to complete full-time study programs. Normally, a student 
will complete all of the suggested courses and 8 to 10 additional 
semester hours of course work. This additional course work may 
include social sciences and humanities electives but could include 
work in computer science or advanced mathematics. 

Before selecting social sciences and humanities electives, students 
should familiarize themselves with the elective requirements of the 
college. A student who wants to transfer to the college must have a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.6 (A = 4.0) to apply, but 
competitive standards for admission are usually higher than the 2.6 
level. 

Students may transfer to the college for the fall, spring, or summer 
session provided they have met competitive grade point average 
cutoffs and have completed 60 or more semester hours of work. 
Transfer students are required to have also completed the basic 
mathematics (through calculus), physics, chemistry, and English (rheto- 
ric and composition) sequences in the 60 or more semester hours 
required for transfer. Transfer students starting their studies in the fall 
semester are allowed to advance enroll during the preceding summer. 
Students are informed of this opportunity after they are admitted. 
Questions are invited concerning this procedure. 

A few sophomore-level technical courses may not be offered by 
most community colleges. However, junior-level transfer students 
can usually arrange their programs on the Urbana-Champaign cam- 
pus so that all technical requirements can be completed in a four- 
semester period on this campus if they wish to do so. If the number of 
hours remaining to complete a degree requires more than four semes- 
ters, the student may enroll for an additional summer session or 
semester. 

Students planning to transfer to the College of Engineering are 
encouraged to write to the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic 
Programs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 315 Ceramics 
Building, 105 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, or to the 
head of the department to which they wish to transfer. A student 
should complete all sequences in mathematics, physics, chemistry, 
and English at one institution to maintain proper continuity. In cases 
where this is not possible, a student may enroll in a summer session to 
make up deficiencies. Individual program plans between most trans- 
fer institutions and the College of Engineering are available upon 
request. 

Transfer students are not required to take freshman guidance 
examinations or any other examinations to qualify for admission to 
the College of Engineering, but all other admission regulations apply 
to them. Transfer students should consult Admission of Transfer 
Applicants section for general information concerning transfer to the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and students from com- 
munity colleges should note especially the rules regarding commu- 
nity colleges. 

GENERAL EDUCATION 

The College of Engineering requires 18 hours of humanities and social 
sciences. The campus also has requirements that can be satisfied with 
the structure of the college requirements. Students should consult 
with the college and department offices and their advisers for specific 
information. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



81 



Special Programs 



Third year 



COMBINED ENGINEERING-LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
PROGRAM 

A five-year program of study permits a student to earn a bachelor of 
science degree in a field of engineering from the College of Engineer- 
ing and a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science degree from the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the Urbana-Champaign cam- 
pus. 

This program affords the student the opportunity to prepare for a 
career of an interdisciplinary nature. By selecting an appropriate 
liberal arts and sciences major in combination with the desired engi- 
neering curriculum, it is possible for a student to qualify for new 
careers in industry, business, or government. A student who desires 
a broader background than can be provided in the four-year engineer- 
ing curricula can develop a program that includes a well-rounded 
cultural education in addition to an engineering specialty. Each stu- 
dent must file an approved program with the College of Engineering 
and with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Advisers in both colleges assist in planning a program of study to 
meet the needs and requirements for both degrees. Most combinations 
of engineering and liberal arts curricula may be completed in ten 
semesters if the student does not have deficiencies in the entrance 
requirements of either college. 

Most engineering curricula can be combined with one of a variety 
of liberal arts and sciences majors, including languages, social sci- 
ences, humanities, speech communication, and philosophy. This com- 
bined program operates under the following conditions: 

— Students entering the program must meet admission require- 
ments for both colleges. 

— A student who starts in the program and decides to transfer from 
it is subject to the existing graduation requirements of the college 
of his or her choice. 

— The degrees of Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of 
Arts or Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences are awarded 
simultaneously. No student in the combined program is permitted 
to receive a degree from either college before the completing the 
entire program. 

— Participants must satisfy the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
foreign language graduation requirement. 

— Students electing advanced Reserve Officers' Training Corps and 
Naval ROTC programs are required to meet these commitments in 
addition to the combined program as outlined. 

— Students having 75 or more hours of transfer credit are not advised 
to enter this program, because they cannot ordinarily complete it 
in five years. 

— Students transferring from other colleges and universities must 
plan to complete at least one year in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences at Urbana-Champaign and one year in the College of 
Engineering at Urbana-Champaign to satisfy residency require- 
ments if both degrees are to be granted here. Other students should 
plan to spend a minimum of two years in each college. 

— A student is expected to maintain at least a 2.5 ( A = 4.0) grade point 
average to be accepted or to continue in the program. A higher 
grade point average may be imposed. 

During the first year, students are enrolled in the common fresh- 
man program for engineers, which is taken in the College of Engineer- 
ing. Students are normally enrolled in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences for the second and third years and in the College of Engineer- 
ing for the fourth and fifth years. A typical combined program follows: 



Second 


year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


4 

5 
4 


Biological science 

Calculus and analytic geometry 

Humanities or social sciences 


4 
17 


Language 
Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


4 
4 
3 


Engineering subject 

Language 

Liberal arts and sciences major 


4 
15 


Physics (electricity and magnetism) 
Total 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 




4 


Humanities or social sciences 




4 
6 


Languages 

Liberal arts and sciences major 




4 
18 


Physics (fluids and thermal physics; 

physics) 

Total 


waves and quantum 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 




6-8 

4 


Engineering subjects 
Humanities or social sciences 




4 
3 


Language 

Liberal arts and sciences major 




17-19 


Total 




Fourth year 




HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 




15 

4 


Engineering subjects 
Humanities or social sciences 




19 


Total 




HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 




18 


Engineering subjects 




Fifth year 






HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 




15-17 


Engineering subjects 




HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 




18 


Engineering subjects 





It may be necessary to adjust the above program to allow the 
student to take more hours in the liberal arts and sciences program. 

For further information about this program, students should write 
to the Office of the Associate Dean in either the College of Engineering 
or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at UIUC. 

AFFILIATIONS WITH OTHER LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGES 

Through a program of affiliation between the College of Engineering 
and a number of liberal arts colleges, a student may enroll in a five- 
year program, earn a bachelor's degree from one of these colleges, and 
at the same time earn a bachelor's degree in engineering from the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In general, students 
spend the first three years at the liberal arts college and the final two 
years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. At the time 
of transfer, students must meet competitive transfer admission re- 
quirements. Students must meet certain residency requirements to 
participate in this program. 

The five-year program encourages a student to develop a broad 
understanding of the social sciences and humanities while striving for 
excellence in technical studies. These affiliations have the added 
benefit of allowing students to take preengineering studies at liberal 
arts schools. Students interested in this dual degree program should 
meet with advisers from both schools to develop an individual plan of 
study. 

Colleges actively affiliated with the College of Engineering are: 

Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois 

Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin 

De Paul University, Chicago, Illinois 

Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois 

Elmhurst College, Elmhurst, Illinois 

Greenville College, Greenville, Illinois 

Illinois Benedictine College, Lisle, Illinois 

Illinois College, Jacksonville, Illinois 

Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 

Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Illinois 

Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois 

Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 

North Central College, Naperville, Illinois 

Olivet Nazarene College, Kankakee, Illinois 

Western Illinois University, Macomb, Illinois 

Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 

COOPERATIVE ENGINEERING EDUCATION PROGRAM 

A five-year program in cooperative engineering education is available 
to students in all curricula in the college. A student in the program 
alternates periods of attendance at UIUC with periods of employment 
in industry or government. The employment, which is an essential 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



82 



element in the educational process, is with the same company each 
work period and is related to the student's field of study. The assign- 
ment increases in difficulty and responsibility with each succeeding 
period off campus. 

Students who wish to participate should apply at the Cooperative 
Engineering Education Office. Job fairs, referrals, and on-campus 
interviews provide employment opportunities. When accepted for 
employment, the student enrolls in the Cooperative Education Pro- 
gram, which retains student status during the employment period. 
Typical schedules and participating employees are shown in a bro- 
chure available from the Cooperative Engineering Education Office, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 Ceramics Building, 
105 South' Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801; telephone (217) 244- 
4165; fax (217) 244-4456; e-mail dickc@uiuc.edu. 

Sophomores, advanced undergraduates, and community college 
transfer students are eligible for the program. Advanced students will 
still require five years to complete the program, but they will have 
fewer off-campus assignments. 

Students enrolled in the cooperative education program are regis- 
tered in the University and are considered to be full-time students for 
the entire five years required by the program. Entries indicating 
participation in the program are entered on the student's official 
transcript. Upon successful completion of the program, the student is 
awarded a certificate signed by the dean of the college and the off- 
campus coordinator and receives the regular diploma awarded for 
completing the degree requirements. 

THESIS 

With the approval of the department concerned, a senior of high 
standing in any curriculum may substitute, for one or more technical 
courses, an investigation of a special subject and write a thesis. 

CURRICULUM MODIFICATION 

A student interested in modifying his or her curriculum may do so by 
checking with his or her department and adviser to determine the 
petition procedure for making a curriculum modification. 

SPECIAL CURRICULA 

Students of high scholastic achievement, with exceptional aptitudes 
and interests in special fields of engineering and their application, 
may be permitted to vary the course content of the standard curricula 
to emphasize some phases not included or not encompassed by the 
usual course substitution and selection of electives. These unwritten 
curricula, however, must include all of the fundamental courses of the 
standard curricula, the variations being made mainly in the so-called 
applicatory portions of the standard curricula of the college. The 
program of study of each student permitted to take such a special 
curriculum must be approved by a committee of the college, in 
consultation with the head of the department in which the student is 
registered and with a faculty member of the college. This faculty 
member automatically becomes the student's adviser in charge of 
registration and other matters pertaining to the approved program. 

ADVANCED ROTC TRAINING COMBINED WITH 
ENGINEERING 

A student in the College of Engineering may elect to participate in the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps Program and earn a commission in 
the U.S. Army Reserve, Air Force Reserve, or Naval Reserve. A 
commission is awarded simultaneously with the awarding of the 
bachelor of science degree in an engineering field. Participation in 
these programs is limited to students who apply to and are selected by 
the army, air force, and navy units at the University. Monthly stipends 
are paid to those selected for advanced military training. 

These programs require from one to three summer camps or 
cruises and the earning of specified numbers of credits in advanced 
military courses. Credits earned appear in all academic averages 
computed by the College of Engineering. Basic military courses (100- 
level) do not count toward graduation. A maximum of 6 hours of 200- 
level military science courses may be used as free electives. A student 
should plan on taking nine semesters to obtain both a bachelor's 
degree in engineering and a commission in the ROTC program. For 
further information, write directly to the professor of military science, 
the professor of aerospace studies, or the professor of naval science 
(see the ROTC section). 



Options and Minors 



BIOENGINEERING MINOR 

Bioengineering is a broad, interdisciplinary field that brings together 
engineering, biology, and medicine to create new techniques, devices, 
and understanding of living systems to improve the quality of human 
life. Its practice ranges from the fundamental study of the behavior of 
biological materials at the molecular level to the design of medical 
devices to assist the disabled. For engineering majors, there is a 
Bioengineering Minor; for biology majors, there is a Bioengineering 
Option in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Any of the existing engineering curricula can provide a good 
foundation for work in bioengineering. However, the engineering 
undergraduate needs additional education in the biologically ori- 
ented sciences to obtain a strong background for bioengineering. With 
such a background, the student should be able to progress rapidly on 
to the graduate level in any branch of bioengineering. In industry, the 
graduate will be competent to handle engineering tasks related to 
biology. 

Students may fulfill the requirements for a minor in bioengineer- 
ing by completing the Bioengineering Core (A or B) and one of the 
course sequences in the following areas of specialization: biomedical 
engineering, biomolecular engineering, bioprocess engineering, cell 
and tissue engineering, and rehabilitation engineering. Depending on 
the area of specialization, 19 to 23 hours are required. To obtain 
recognition for the bioengineering minor, students must register in 
the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Programs, 315 Ceramics 
Building. 

BIOENGINEERING CORE* 



A 


B 


REQUIREMENTS 


1 


1 


BIOEN 120 — Introduction to Bioengineering 




4 


BIOEN 254— The Physical Basis of Life (same as 
BIOPH 254) 


3 




BIOEN 314 — Biomedical Instrumentation (same as 
ECE 314) 


4 


5 


Total 



The core taken is determined by the area of specialization chosen. Contact the 

Bioengineering Office for an updated list of available courses. 

Core A — Biomedical Engineering, Bioprocess Engineering, or Rehabilitation 

Engineering. 

Core B — Biomolecular Engineering or Cell and Tissue Engineering. 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

3 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

3 PHYSL 301— Cell and Membrane Physiology 1 - 2 

3 PHYSL 302— Systems and Integrative Physiology" 

2 PHYSL 303— Cell and Membrane Physiology Laboratory 

2 PHYSL 304 — Systems and Integrative Physiology Laboratory 1 

3 Technical Elective 5 
16 Total 

1. BIOPH 301— Introduction to Biophysics, may be substituted for PHYSL 301. 

2. Biology prerequisites will be waived by the instructor for advanced engineering 
students. 

3. PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology, may be substituted for PHYSL 
302. 

4. Engineering students are not required to take PHYSL 302 when PHYSL 103 is taken. 

5. Courses to be selected from Bioengineering and Related Courses List. 

BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

3 BIOCHEM 350 — Introductory Biochemistry 

3 CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry 

3 PHYSL 301— Cell and Membrane Physiology 1 - 2 

2 PHYSL 303 — Cell and Membrane Physiology Laboratory 

3 Technical Elective 3 
14 Total 

1. BIOPH 301— Introduction to Biophysics, may be substituted for PHYSL 301. 

2. Biology prerequisites will be waived by the instructor for advanced engineering 
students. 

3. Courses to be selected from Bioengineering and Related Courses List. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



83 



BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

2 AG E 385 — Food and Process Engineering Design 

3 FSHN 371/MCBIO 311— Food and Industrial Microbiology 
3 MCBIO 200— Microbiology 1 

3-5 MCBIO 201— Experimental Microbiology 2 

2 MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 

3 Technical Elective 3 
16-18 Total 

1. MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology, may be substituted for MCBIO 200. 

2. MCBIO 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology, may be substituted for 
MCBIO 201. 

3. Courses to be selected from Bioengineering and Related Courses List. 

CELL AND TISSUE ENGINEERING 



HOURS 

A 

3 
3 
3 
2 
4-5 

3 
18-19 



REQUIREMENTS 

B 
3 
3 
3 
2 



3 
3 
17 



BIOCH 350— Introductory Biochemistry 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

CSB 213— Cells and Tissues 

CSB 215 — Cells and Tissues Laboratory 

CSB 300— Cell Biology, I 

PHYSL 301— Cell and Membrane Physiology 

Technical Elective 1 

Total 



1. Courses to be selected from Bioengineering and Related Courses List. 
REHABILITATION ENGINEERING 



HOURS 



REQUIREMENTS 
C 



BIOEN 370MS1 — Special Topics in Bioengineering 

(Introduction to Rehabilitation Engineering) 1 
BIOEN 370MS2 — Special Topics in Bioengineering 

(Industrial and Rehabilitation Ergonomics) 1 
BIOEN 370MS3 — Special Topics in Bioengineering 

(Biomechanics and Assistive Technology Design) 1 
BIOEN 370MS4 — Special Topics in Bioengineering 

(Electronic and Computer Assistive Technology 

Design) 1 

CSB 234 — Functional Human Anatomy 
PHYSL 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 
Technical Elective 2 
Total 



1 . Permanent numbers are being requested; student should check with a bioengineering 
adviser before choosing this area of specialization. 

2. Courses to be selected from Bioengineering and Related Courses List. 

BIOENGINEERING AND RELATED COURSES 



5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 


18 


18 


18 



HOURS 

4 

3 

2 

1-5 

4 

0-4 

2 

3 

3 

3 
3 

2 

0-4 

3-4 

3 

1-3 

5 

3 

3 

1-4 

1 

3 

3 
3 



REQUIREMENTS 

AG E 222 — Engineering for Bioprocessing and 

Bioenvironmental Systems 

AG E 383 — Engineering Properties of Food Materials 

AG E 385 — Food and Process Engineering Design 

BIOEN 199— Undergraduate Open Seminar 

BIOEN 254— The Physical Basis of Life (same as BIOPH 254) 

BIOEN 270— Individual Study 

BIOEN 270D— Individual Study (Radiation Oncology) 

BIOEN 280— Biomedical Imaging (same as ECE 280) 

BIOEN 306 — Veterinary Orthopedic Biomechanics (same as 

VB 306) 

BIOEN 308 — Implant Materials for Medical Applications 

BIOEN 314— Biomedical Instrumentation (same as ECE 314) 

BIOEN 315 — Biomedical Instrumentation Laboratory (same 

as ECE 315) 

BIOEN 370 — Special Topics in Bioengineering (topics vary 

each semester) 

BIOEN 375— Modeling of Bio-Systems (same as ECE 375) 

BIOEN 380— Magnetic Resonance Imaging (same as ECE 380) 

CH E 396 — Special Topics in Chemical Engineering 

CSB 234 — Functional Human Anatomy 

ECE 373 — Fundamentals of Engineering Acoustics 

ECE 374 — Ultrasonic Techniques 

ENG H 297— College Honors Seminar 

GE 293MM — Special Problems (Topics in Biomechanics) 

I E 240 — Human Factors in Human-Machine Systems (same as 

PSYCH 258) 

I E 357 — Safety Engineering 

KINES 255 — Biomechanical Analysis of Human Movement 



3 KINES 257— Coordination, Control, and Skill 

3 KINES 356 — Electromyographic Kinesiology 

3 KINES 359— Physical Activity and Aging 

2 NUC E 241— Introduction to Radiation Protection 

4 NUC E 341— Principles of Radiation Protection 

5 PHYCS 343— Electronic Circuits, I 

4 PHYSL/NEURO 315— Structure and Function of the Nervous 

System (same as CSB 307) 
4 REHAB 301— Introduction to Rehabilitation 

4 REHAB 302— Medical Aspects of Disability 

4 REHAB 340 — Introduction to Sensory Impairments 

4 REHAB 344 — Introduction to Adaptive Technologies for 

Persons with Disabilities 
3-4 Other department specialties related to bioengineering (taken 

as electives) 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR 

This minor is offered by the Department of Computer Science for 
students seeking significant knowledge of digital computers without 
the more complete treatment of a major in computer science. The 
foundation 100- and 200-level courses in computer programming and 
software and in theory of computation are required. Three elective 
200- and 300-level courses provide some specialization and depth and 
breadth of study. This minor may not be taken by computer engineer- 
ing majors. Specific requirements are listed below. Note that some 
courses have other prerequisites. 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

4 C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

2 C S 173— Discrete Mathematical Structures 

4 C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

3 At least one additional course chosen from: 

C S 231 — Computer Architecture, I 

C S 232 — Computer Architecture, II 

C S 257— Numerical Methods 

C S 273 — Introduction to Theory of Computation 

C S 348 — Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 

3 At least one 300-level course chosen from: 

C S 321 — Programming Languages and Compilers 

C S 323 — Operating Systems Design 

C S 331 — Embedded Systems Architecture 

C S 333 — Computer System Organization 

C S 335 — Introduction to VLSI System Design 

C S 337— VLSI System and Logic Design 

C S 341 — Mechanized Mathematical Inference 

C S 342 — Computer Inference and Knowledge Acquisition 

C S 346 — Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning 

C S 347 — Knowledge-Based Programming 

C S 358 — Numerical Linear Algebra 

C S 359 — Numerical Approximations and Ordinary 

Differential Equations 
C S 373 — Combinatorial Algorithms 
C S 375 — Automata, Formal Languages, and 

Computational Complexity 
C S 384 — Computer Data Acquisition Systems 

3 Another 200- or 300-level course chosen from the lists above 

or from these additional courses: 
C S 311 — Database Systems 
C S 318 — Computer Graphics 
C S 326 — Compiler Construction 
C S 327 — Software Engineering 

C S 328 — Computer Networks and Distributed Systems 
C S 338 — Communication Networks for Computers 
C S 339 — Computer-Aided Design for Digital Systems 
C S 362— Logic Design 

19 Total 

FOOD AND BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING MINOR 

The food processing industry is the largest manufacturing industry in 
the United States and in the world. Nearly all food products require 
some preservation, processing, storage, and shipping. Preservation 
and processing techniques for foods, pharmaceuticals, and related 
products are becoming increasingly scrutinized to insure safety of the 
products and to increase productivity of the processes. 

Technical developments in the food, pharmaceutical, and related 
processing industries have created a need for professionals with 
training in food and bioprocess engineering. The demand for engi- 
neers with specialized training is increasing as processing techniques 
become more sophisticated and as companies improve their facilities. 

Engineering students interested in developing a background in 
food or bioprocess engineering may pursue a structured program of 
study that will lead to a bachelor's degree in an engineering discipline 
and a minor in food and bioprocess engineering at graduation. This 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



84 



program is intended for engineering students in all major disciplines. 
In most cases, courses from the minor can be applied as electives in the 
student's major. 

To receive a minor in food and bioprocess engineering, a student 
must complete the following requirements: 

a. Twelve semester credit hours of required courses. (See Required 
Courses below.) 

b. Four semester credit hours of elective courses. (See Elective 
Courses below.) 

c. An internship at a food, pharmaceutical, or related processing 
company. (See Internship below.) 

d. A bachelor of science degree in the student's chosen field of 
engineering study. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

AG E 383 — Engineering Properties of Food Materials 

AG E 385 — Food and Process Engineering Design 

FSHN 204 — Food Microbiology for Non-Majors 

FSHN 231— Science of Foods or FSHN 314— Food Chemistry 

and Nutrition, I 

FSHN 365 — Principles of Food Technology 

Total 



ELECTIVE COURSES 

Choose 4 semester credit hours from the following: 

AG E 311 — Instrumentation and Measurement 

AG E 387 — Grain Drying and Conditioning 

AG E 389 — Process Design for Corn Milling 

AG E 396 — Special Problems (Package Engineering) 

FSHN 260 — Raw Materials for Processing 



HOURS 

3 

2 

1 

3 or 4 

3 

12 or 13 

HOURS 

3-4 

3 

3 

3 

4 

Other courses, subject to approval 

INTERNSHIP 

An internship with a food, pharmaceutical, or related processing 
company is required (ENG 210). It is expected that all students making 
satisfactory progress in the minor will have opportunity for employ- 
ment. Assignments will be determined by interviews and contacts 
with company representatives, and students will compete with others 
in the program for specific positions. Each student is required to write 
a paper that summarizes the internship. (Under certain conditions this 
requirement may be replaced by an additional three semester credit 
hours of course work.) 

More information about the food and process engineering minor 
is available from Bruce Litchfield, 360E Agricultural Engineering 
Sciences Building (AESB), telephone: (217) 333-9525, e-mail: b- 
litch@uiuc.edu; Marvin Paulsen, 360B AESB, telephone: (217) 333- 
7926, e-mail: mxp@age.uiuc.edu; Steven Eckhoff, 360C AESB, tele- 
phone: (217) 244-4022, e-mail: sre@age.uiuc.edu; or from the Office of 
the Associate Dean for Academic Programs, 315 Ceramics Building. 

MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING OPTION 

Recent national attention on quality and productivity improvements 
in the manufacturing sector has led to a resurgence of emphasis and 
activity in manufacturing engineering. The demand is increasing for 
engineers who will be qualified to design and operate the factories of 
the future. This field requires the integration of information technol- 
ogy, materials, and machines. It is believed that no single engineering 
discipline can supply the type of engineer needed for system integra- 
tion. The option in manufacturing engineering provides an opportu- 
nity for engineering students to learn a common language of manufac- 
turing systems engineering. 

This program is intended for engineering students in all major 
disciplines who are interested in manufacturing engineering. The 
option in manufacturing engineering requires a total of 18 semester 
hours of course work. Only a small number of these courses may be 
above and beyond the requirements of the student's regular curricu- 
lum, particularly if the student can make use of technical elective or 
similarly designated hours. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

3 MFG E 210 — Introduction to Manufacturing Systems 

6 Level 2 courses: 

3 MFG E 320— Decision-Making and Control 

Applications in Manufacturing 
3 MFG E 330— Interfacing Methods for 

Manufacturing Systems 
3 MFG E 340 — Processing and Finishing of Materials 

3 MFG E 350 — Information Management for 

Manufacturing Systems 
9 Level 3' courses. In order that the option have some 

coherence, the three courses must be selected from specified 
groups of courses related to the Level 2 courses. 



Courses within a given discipline that are required for completion 
of the bachelor's degree in that discipline may not be used by students 
in that discipline to satisfy the Level 3 course requirements of the 
option. 

It is recommended that one of the Level 3 courses be an indepen- 
dent study project course dealing with an open-ended manufacturing 
design problem. Students enrolled in the project course will apply 
engineering principles and techniques learned from manufacturing- 
related courses and topics covered in their major disciplines in the 
formulation, analysis, and solution of manufacturing design prob- 
lems. 



'Level 3 Courses: Each Level 2 course is supported by approximately 20 to 30 Level 3 
courses that now exist within the course structures of the various engineering 
departments. These courses provide students with the opportunity to specialize in one 
or more aspects of manufacturing engineering. 

The course of study for a manufacturing option thus provides a 
student with a flexible program that can be tailored to suit the area of 
interest and the major engineering discipline in which the student is 
enrolled. To foster an interdisciplinary learning environment, a set of 
laboratories has also been developed. 

The director of the program is Professor Shiv G. Kapoor, Depart- 
ment of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (phone 217-333-3432). 
Additional information can be obtained from him or at the Office of 
the Associate Dean for Academic Programs, 315 Ceramics Building. 

POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING MINOR 

Polymer science and engineering is a broad, interdisciplinary field 
that brings together various aspects of chemistry, physics, and engi- 
neering for the understanding, development, and application of the 
materials science of polymers. Many of the existing engineering 
curricula provide a good foundation for work in polymer science and 
engineering. However, the undergraduate student needs additional 
courses specifically dealing with the science and engineering of large 
molecules. With such a background, the student should be able to 
progress rapidly in industry or at the graduate level. In addition to 
those students specifically desiring a career in polymers, this minor 
also can be valuable to students interested in the development, design, 
and application of materials in general. 

The courses listed below have been selected specifically to give an 
undergraduate student a strong background in polymer science and 
engineering. A minimum of eight courses is required, several of which 
the student would normally take to satisfy the requirements of the 
basic degree. To obtain recognition for the polymer science and 
engineering minor, students must register in the Office of the Associ- 
ate Dean for Academic Programs, 315 Ceramics Building. The student 
should also consult with Professor Phillip H. Geil, Department of 
Materials Science and Engineering, 211 Metallurgy and Mining Build- 
ing, (217) 333-0149, geil@uiuc.edu, when considering the minor and 
deciding on a program. 

HOURS CORE COURSES 

3 MATSE 350 — Introduction to Polymer Science and 

Engineering, or CH E 392 — Polymer Science and Engineering 
3 MATSE 352 — Polymer Characterization Laboratory 

3 MATSE 353— Plastics Engineering 

HOURS THERMODYNAMICS 

3-8 Choose one of the following: 

3 CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 
8 CHEM 342— Physical Chemistry, I; and CHEM 

344 — Physical Chemistry, II 

4 MATSE 301— Thermodynamics of Materials 

3 ME 205 — Thermodynamics 

4 PHYCS 361— Thermodynamics and Statistical 
Mechanics 

HOURS MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 

3 T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 

HOURS CHEMISTRY 

4 CHEM 236— Fundamental Organic Chemistry, I 

HOURS RELATED COURSES 

6-7 Choose at least two of the following: 1 

3 CHEM 336 — Fundamental Organic Chemistry, II 

3 CHEM 337— Organic Chemistry 

3 MATSE 355 — Polymer Physics, I: Structure and 

Properties 
3 MATSE 357— Polymer Chemistry 

3 MATSE 358— Polymer Physical Chemistry, I 

3 MATSE 380— Surfaces and Colloids 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



85 



3 ME 351 — Materials Processing 

4 NRES 380— Fiber Theory and Textile Performance 

3 T A M 327 — Deformation and Fracture of Polymeric 

Materials 
3 T A M 328 — Mechanical Behavior of Composite 

Materials 



1. Other polymer-related courses may be substituted upon petition. 

International Opportunities 

INTERNATIONAL MINOR IN ENGINEERING 

Many College of Engineering graduates will be involved in interna- 
tional activities during their professional careers. In anticipation of 
such involvement, the college offers an opportunity for students to 
complete an international minor as part of any engineering degree 
program. More than 95 percent of the engineering students have had 
foreign language training, and this program allows them to continue 
their studies in related areas. All international minor requirements 
must be satisfied before graduation. To complete the international 
minor, the student must: 

— complete all degree requirements in the student's selected engi- 
neering discipline; 

— complete foreign language studies in a language of the student's 
choice of geographical area (proficiency level will vary with the 
geographical area selected); 

— complete a minimum of 21 hours of cultural and language studies 
related to the geographical area of concentration; 9 hours must be 
other than language credit and include at least one 300-level course. 
The courses can be used as campus and college general education 
requirements; 

— complete a minimum six-weeks residence in the chosen country or 
geographic area, whether it be for work or study. 

The student will be expected to select a specific geographical area 
for concentration, which will be identified in the designation of the 
minor; for example, International Minor — Latin American Studies. 
Course work selected for the minor must be approved by the Interna- 
tional Programs in Engineering office; a list of suggested courses is 
available. 

International Programs in Engineering sponsors both academic 
year, semester, and summer programs, described below, that include 
language and cultural courses and satisfy the residency requirement. 
With sufficient foreign language background before entering engi- 
neering, a student will normally be able to complete the degree in four 
years. Those not having this background, or taking a year of study in 
a foreign institution, may take four and one-half to five years to 
complete their degrees. 

INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING FELLOWSHIP 

An alumnus of the College of Engineering, Armin Elmendorf, estab- 
lished a fund to encourage engineering students to seek an under- 
standing of the responsibilities of world citizenship. Engineering 
students traveling abroad as part of the educational programs spon- 
sored by the College of Engineering are eligible to receive a fellowship 
and to apply for other financial aid. Fellowship funds have certain 
requirements for qualification. Further inf ormation about these travel 
awards may be obtained from the International Programs in Engi- 
neering office. 

ON-THE-JOB TRAINING IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

The International Association for the Exchange of Students for Tech- 
nical Experience (IAESTE) is a private, nonprofit organization that 
enables students of engineering, architecture, and the sciences to 
obtain on-the-job training in foreign countries. Any student, under- 
graduate or graduate, who is enrolled in good standing at the Univer- 
sity and who has completed at least the sophomore year of study may 
apply. Generally, the maintenance allowance is adequate to cover 
living expenses while in training but does not cover transportation 
costs. Further information about these opportunities may be obtained 
from the College of Engineering. 

EXCHANGE SCHOLARSHIPS AT MUNICH AND DARMSTADT, 
GERMANY 

The College of Engineering has exchange scholarships with the Tech- 
nical University in Munich, Germany, and the Darmstadt University 
of Technology in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the terms of the agree- 
ment, two University of Illinois students are given tuition scholar- 



ships at the Technical University in Munich and five are given schol- 
arships at the Darmstadt University of Technology. Stipends to cover 
living expenses for the year are included in the Munich program. 
Students selected by the Technical University in Munich and by the 
Darmstadt University of Technology receive tuition scholarships at 
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Equivalent cash 
stipends are awarded to the Munich students. Students are respon- 
sible for their own transportation expenses. 

To be eligible for study at the Technical University in Munich, a 
student should be enrolled in one of the following curricula: civil and 
environmental engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engi- 
neering, materials science, mechanical engineering, nuclear engineer- 
ing, engineering physics. To be eligible for study at the Darmstadt 
University of Technology, a student should be enrolled in one of the 
following curricula: civil and environmental engineering, chemical 
engineering, mechanical engineering, physics . Normally, credit earned 
at these institutions can be transferred and used in the student's 
curriculum at Urbana-Champaign. 

To participate in one of the programs, a student must have com- 
pleted GER 104 or the equivalent (additional courses in German are 
recommended) and finished his or her sophomore studies in engi- 
neering at the Urbana-Champaign campus. In addition, the student 
must be an outstanding scholar who will be an excellent representa- 
tive of the University of Illinois and must be a U.S. citizen. 

The programs are under the general administration of the Engi- 
neering College Honors Council, although a recipient need not be an 
honors student if he or she has an outstanding undergraduate record. 
Students can earn credit toward their engineering degree while par- 
ticipating in these programs. 

FRENCH EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 

College of Engineering students may participate in the French ex- 
change programs at the following institutions: Institut National 
Polytechnique de Lorraine (INPL), Nancy, and Universite de 
Technologie de Compiegne, Compiegne. Each student should be a 
junior and should have credit for FR 104 or the equivalent, although 
additional courses in French are recommended. One- or two-semester 
programs are available, with tuition and certain academic-related 
expenses provided. 

The Trois Ecoles program offers engineering students a chance to 
study at one of Paris's Grandes Ecoles: Telecommunications 
(TELECOM), Electricite (SUPELEC), or Techniques Avancees (ENSTA). 
These institutions emphasize electrical and computer engineering, 
but courses are also offered in chemical, industrial, and mechanical 
engineering and computer science. Students with junior- or senior- 
level standing and advanced French-language skills can select the 
institution that specializes in an area of interest. These programs offer 
students the opportunity to live among French students, experience 
European culture, and improve language skills for a semester or 
academic year. Students can earn credit toward their engineering 
degree while participating in these programs. 

SUMMER EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 

To introduce College of Engineering students to other cultures and 
languages, summer programs were developed with institutions in 
Argentina, Brazil, Chile, China, France, Germany, Japan, Mexico, and 
Russia. These opportunities are designed mainly to enable students to 
learn about the people of these countries during a six-week period, to 
study the language, and to work in a limited way with technology. 
Travel to interesting places is included in these programs. Although 
no previous language instruction is required to apply for a program, 
a credit course in the appropriate language is required in the spring 
semester before departure. Lodging and meals are included in the 
exchange fee. Students earn 6-8 hours of credit that can be used 
towards their social sciences and humanities requirements for the 
college and towards the International Minor in Engineering, if en- 
rolled. 

OTHER STUDY ABROAD EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 

Many exchange programs are available for engineering students on 
this campus with educational institutions throughout the world. The 
College of Engineering works closely with the Study Abroad Office in 
developing programs of study in which course credits can be trans- 
ferred to this campus. Engineering students have participated in 
programs in Australia, Great Britain, Spain, and other countries and 
have received credit for these programs. The College of Engineering 
has preapproved most of these programs for engineering students. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



86 



Further information about these and other programs may be obtained 
from the International Programs in Engineering office, 211 Ceramics 
Building, or http://coe-info.cen.uiuc.edu/international/ or e-mail 
ipeng@uiuc.edu. 

Honors Programs 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

Honors awarded at graduation to superior students are designated on 
the diploma as honors, high honors, or highest honors. A student 
receives honors with a cumulative University of Illinois grade point 
average of at least 3.5, and high honors with at least a 3.8 grade point 
average at graduation (A = 4.0). Highest honors may be awarded to 
any student eligible for high honors upon recommendation of his or 
her department. The criteria used by departments in selecting indi- 
viduals for highest honors recognition include outstanding perfor- 
mance in course work and in supplementary activities of an academic 
or professional nature. Ordinarily, such a citation requires completion 
of an undergraduate thesis or a special project of superior quality. 

TAU BETA PI 

Tau Beta Pi is a national engineering honor society that recognizes 
students, alumni, and engineers for outstanding academic achieve- 
ments and exemplary character. The Alpha chapter at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1897 and is the fifth 
oldest chapter of Tau Beta Pi. In addition to gaining scholastic recog- 
nition, members participate in a range of activities that serve the 
chapter, the College of Engineering, and the community. The scholas- 
tic requirement for membership in Tau Beta Pi is that juniors must be 
in the upper one-eighth of their graduating class and seniors must be 
in the upper one-fifth of their graduating class. 

EDMUND J. JAMES SCHOLARS 

The honors program in engineering is part of the University's James 
Scholar program, which was established to recognize and develop the 
talents of academically outstanding students. Engineering students in 
this program are known as "James Scholars in Engineering." Each is 
assigned to an honors adviser and receives special consideration in the 
selection of a course program to meet specific needs. Students may 
apply for the program during summer advance enrollment or at the 
beginning of any semester. 

Freshmen in the College of Engineering are eligible to enter the 
program with an ACT composite score of 33 or higher or equivalent 
SAT score. Continuation in the program or joining as an upperclass 
student requires a minimum 3.3 GPA and the development and 
approval of an honors contract, which is a coherent plan of special 
academic work. Details are available from the Office of the Associate 
Dean for Academic Programs. 

Good standing in the James Scholar program at graduation re- 
quires participation in special honors work for a majority of the 
semesters in which a student is in residence. 

DEAN'S LIST 

See the reference to the Dean's List in the Graduation with Honors 
section. 

Electives 



HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES ELECTIVES 

Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences are required (in 
addition to rhetoric); these are normally chosen to also satisfy campus 
general education requirements. Six hours of social sciences and six 
hours of humanities must be taken for grade. The remaining six hours 
of social sciences or humanities may be taken credit-no credit. Note: 
campus general education requirements must be taken for credit. 

Information about general education requirements is available in 
the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and on the 
Web site http://www.uiuc.edu/providers/provost/gened.html. 

Students may obtain credit from different academic sources, i.e., 
residential instruction, College-Level Examination Program tests, 
advanced placement tests, and transfer credits. Credit in any specific 
subject may be used toward degree requirements only once. Because 
of the variety of sources available for social sciences and humanities 
electives, students may receive duplicate credit in specific courses, 



such as American history. Students should be aware that such dupli- 
cation cannot be used toward degree requirements. 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Each engineering curriculum offers some elective opportunities, which 
may be specified as technical or nontechnical. All technical elective 
courses must be selected in accordance with departmental require- 
ments. 

Technical electives generally include 200- and 300-level courses in 
engineering, mathematics, and the natural sciences. 

FREE ELECTIVES 

These electives are selected at the prerogative of the student except as 
noted below. 

Credit will not be allowed for courses of a remedial nature, such as 
mathematics below analytic geometry or basic military training. No 
more than 3 semester hours of physical education course work (basic 
level, i.e., activity courses) may be used as free electives nor may they 
be applied toward degree requirements. No more than 4 hours of 
religious foundation courses or 6 hours of advanced military science 
courses may be used as free electives. 

Total transfer credit in required basic courses in mathematics 
(through integral calculus), physics, rhetoric, freshman chemistry, 
computer science, and engineering graphics may be used for free 
electives only if the credit covers topics beyond those in equivalent 
courses at UIUC. Further restrictions on the acceptance of transfer 
credit for free electives may be imposed by the departments with the 
approval of the associate dean for academic programs. 

CREDIT-NO CREDIT OPTION 

The credit-no credit grade option is available for students who want 
to explore areas of academic interest that they might otherwise avoid 
for fear of poor grades. All students considering this option are 
cautioned that many graduate and professional schools consider 
applicants whose transcripts bear a significant number of nongrade 
symbols less favorably than those whose transcripts contain none or 
very few. Conditions under which students may take courses on a 
credit-no credit basis are outlined in the booklet Code on Campus Affairs 
and Handbook of Policies and Regulations Applying to All Students, which 
is distributed to all students. Required courses in the College of 
Engineering may not be taken on this basis. 

Curricula 



CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL AND 
ASTRONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

Department of Aeronautical and 
Astronautical Engineering 
306 Talbot Laboratory 
104 South Wright Street 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2651 
E-mail: sgmoore@uiuc.edu 
URL: http://www.aae.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical and 
Astronautical Engineering 

The objective of the aeronautical and astronautical engineering cur- 
riculum is to instill in students the knowledge, values, and leadership 
in engineering that will prepare them for lifetimes of continued 
learning and growth in the profession and in a broad spectrum of 
other fields. This curriculum provides a strong fundamental back- 
ground in the engineering and applied sciences and their applications 
to the design of aircraft and spacecraft. The concepts of system design, 
which originated in the aerospace industry, are introduced in the 
freshman year, developed further in the sophomore and junior years, 
and reinforced and polished in the year-long senior capstone design 
experience (A A E 240, 241) in which the students respond to a design 
problem (an RFP) from industry, government, or one of the profes- 
sional engineering societies. As many as 16 hours of free and technical 
electives allow the student to pursue a diversified or a specialized 
program of study. 

The curriculum requires 134 hours for graduation. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



87 



First year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

1 A A E 199 — Introduction to Aerospace Engineering 1 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

3 G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 
Version) 

1 CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 
Physical Version) 

3 MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

4 PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 
4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

15 Total 



Second year 



HOURS 

3 

2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
15 

HOURS 

2 
2 
3 

3 
4 
3 
17 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

T A M 150 — Introduction to Statics 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

A A E 201 — Principles of Aerospace Systems 

A A E 204 — Introduction to Aerospace Dynamic Systems 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 

M E 205 — Thermodynamics 

PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
18 



FIRST SEMESTER 

A A E 210 — Aerodynamics I, Compressible Flow 

A A E 220 — Aerospace Structures, I 

A A E 250 — Aerospace Dynamic Systems, I 

MATH 280— Advanced Calculus 

Electives 3 

Total 



HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 A A E 206— Flight Mechanics 

3 A A E 211 — Aerodynamics II, Incompressible Flow 

3 A A E 221 — Aerospace Structures, II 

3 A A E 233 — Aerospace Propulsion 

3 A A E 251 — Aerospace Dynamic Systems, II 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

18 Total 

Fourth year 



HOURS 

3 
2 
3 
1 

9 

18 

HOURS 

3 
2 
6 
6 

17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

A A E 240 — Aerospace System Design, I" 

A A E 260 — Aerospace Laboratory, I 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 

Electives 3 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

A A E 241 — Aerospace System Design, II 4 
A A E 261 — Aerospace Laboratory, II 
Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 
Electives 3 
Total 



1. This course is highly recommended for freshmen, who may elect to use it to help 
meet free elective requirements. 

2. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering and the campus general education requirements for social 
sciences and humanities. 

3. Elective credits totaling 22 hours are required for graduation. These electives must 
contain at least 3 hours from List A below and 3 hours from List B. In addition, credit 
is required in at least 6 hours of 300-level aeronautical and astronautical engineering 



courses. A total of 6 hours are free electives. The remaining hours are technical 
electives acceptable to the AAE Department. 

A: ECE 229; ME 261; PHYCS 371 

B: MATSE 346; TAM 324 
4. Sequence satisfies the general education Composition II requirement. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 

338 Agricultural Engineering Sciences Building 

1304 West Pennsylvania Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-3570 

Fax: (217) 244-0323 

E-mail: l-bode@uiuc.edu 

URL: http://www.age.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural 
Engineering 

Agricultural engineering is the integration of biological and physical 
sciences as a foundation for engineering applications in agriculture, 
food systems, natural resources, the environment, and related biologi- 
cal systems. 

Agricultural engineers are involved in the design of systems that 
include food and bioprocess engineering, off-road equipment, bioen- 
vironmental engineering of plant and animal facilities, water quality, 
and systems for the use and protection of soil and water resources. 
Important design constraints are economics, conservation of materi- 
als and energy, safety, and environmental quality. 

Graduates are employed by industry, consulting firms, and gov- 
ernment for research, education, and manufacturing. All graduates 
obtain a four-year ABET-accredited bachelor of science degree from 
the College of Engineering and, in an optional five-year program, may 
receive a second bachelor of science degree in agricultural engineering 
sciences from the College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environ- 
mental Sciences. By choice of electives, a student may direct his or her 
program toward specialization in power and machinery, soil and 
water, structures and environment, or electric power and processing 
or to a separate food and bioprocess engineering specialization. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation except for the 
specialization in food and bioprocess engineering, which requires 132 
hours for graduation. 

SPECIALIZATION IN POWER AND MACHINERY, SOIL AND 
WATER, STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENT, OR ELECTRIC 
POWER AND PROCESSING 

First year 



HOURS 

1 
3 
1 



3 
5 
4 

17 

HOURS 

3 



3 
2 
4 
4 
17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AG E 100 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 1 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version)* 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 

Physical Version)* 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

MATH 225— Introductory Matrix Theory 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Biological and natural sciences elective 2 

Total 



'Biological version recommended. 

Second year 



HOURS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AG E 221 — Engineering for Agricultural and Biological 

Systems 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112 — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



88 



2-3 T A M 150— Introduction to Statics or T A M 152— 

Engineering Mechanics, I-Statics 
16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 AG E 222 — Engineering for Bioprocessing and 

Bioenvironmental Systems 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 
Functions 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

3 T A M 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II-Dynamics 
3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 3 ' 4 

15 Total 

Third year 



HOURS 

3 
3 
1 

3 
3-4 



3 
16-17 

HOURS 

3 
1 
3 
3-4 

3-4 

3 
16-18 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Agricultural engineering technical elective 5 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 

T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 

STAT 310/MATH 363— Introduction to Mathematical 

Statistics and Probability, I; or CEE 293 — Engineering 

Modeling Under Uncertainty; or I E 230 — Analysis of Data 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 34 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Agricultural engineering technical elective 5 

AG E 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 

ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 3 

M E 205 — Thermodynamics, or CH E 370 — Chemical 

Engineering Thermodynamics 

T A M 235 — Fluid Mechanics, or CH E 371— Fluid Mechanics 

and Heat Transfer, or M E 211 — Introductory Gas Dynamics 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 3 - 4 

Total 



Fourth year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 Agricultural engineering technical elective 5 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 3,4 

4 Technical elective 5 
3 Free elective 4 

2 AG E 299— Undergraduate Thesis 

15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 Agricultural engineering technical elective 5 
3 Free elective 4 

3 Technical elective 5 

4 Biological and natural sciences elective 2 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 3-4 

16 Total 



1. Students may take SPCOM 111 and 112 in place of RHET 105. 

2. Students must complete eight hours from biological and natural sciences approved 
list. 

3. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering, including ECON 102 or 103, and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

4. One elective course must satisfy the general education Composition II requirement. 

5. Students must have 19 hours of technical electives; at least 12 hours must be from 
AG E courses and the remainder selected from the department-approved list. 

Biological and Natural Sciences Electives 



HOURS 

8 min 



Choose from: 

3 AN SCI 202— Domestic Animal Physiology 

3 AN SCI 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal 

Management 

BIOL 100— Biological Sciences 1 

BIOL 101— Biological Sciences 1 

BIOL 104 — Animal Biology 1 

CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 234 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

Laboratory 

CPSC 322— Forage Crops and Pastures 1 

CPSC/ENT/NRES 120— Introduction to Applied 

Entomology 

FSHN/MCBIO 311— Food and Industrial 

Microbiology 

GEOL 101— Introduction to Physical Geology 

GEOL 250 — Geology for Engineers 

MCBIO 100 — Introductory Microbiology 1 



2 MCBIO 101— Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 

2 MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 
4 NRES 101— Introductory Soils 

3 NRES 245— Indoor Plant Culture, Use, and 
Identification 

4 NRES 365— Growth and Development of 
Horticultural Crops 

4 PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 1 or CPSC 121— Principles 

of Field Crop Sciences 
4 PHYSL 103— Introduction to Human Physiology 



1. Students must take at least one of these courses. 
Technical Electives 



For a total of 19 hours. 

Agricultural Engineering Technical Electives 



HOURS 

3 

2 

3 

3 

3-4 

3 



AG E 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 

AG E 271 — Transport Phenomena in Food Process Design 

AG E 277 — Design of Architectural Structures 1 

AG E 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 1 

AG E 311 — Instrumentation and Measurement 2 

AG E 315 — Applied Machine Vision 

AG E 336 — Engineering Design Projects for Agricultural 

Industries 1 

AG E 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 

AG E 356 — Soil and Water Conservation Structures 1 

AG E 357— Land Drainage 1 

AG E 383 — Engineering Properties of Food Materials 

AG E 385 — Food and Process Engineering Design 1 

AG E 387 — Grain Drying and Conditioning 

AG E 389— Process Design for Corn Milling 



1. Students must take at least one of these courses. Includes major design experience. 

2. This course is strongly recommended. 

Other Technical Electives 

Choose the remainder of the 19 hours from: 



CEE 201 — Engineering Surveying 

CEE 241 — Environmental Quality Engineering 

CEE 255 — Introduction to Hydrosystems Engineering 1 

CEE 261 — Introduction to Structural Engineering 1 

CEE 263 — Behavior and Design of Metal Structures, I 

CEE 264 — Reinforced Concrete Design, I 

CEE 280 — Introduction to Soil Mechanics and Foundation 

Engineering 

CEE 350— Surface Water Hydrology 

CEE 361 — Matrix Analysis of Frame Structures 

CH E 261 — Introduction to Chemical Engineering 

CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

CH E 371— Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 

CH E 373 — Mass Transfer Operations 

G E 288 — Engineering Economy and Operations Research 

M E 231 — Engineering Materials 

M E 271 — Mechanical Design, I 1 

M E 285 — Design for manufacturability 

M E 307— Solar Energy Utilization 

MFG E 210 — Introduction to Manufacturing Systems 

MFG E 350 — Information Management for Manufacturing 

Systems 

PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

PHYCS 343/CHEM 323— Electronic Circuits, I 

Any 200- or 300-level engineering course approved by an 

adviser. 



1. One of these courses is strongly recommended. 

SPECIALIZATION IN FOOD AND BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING 

Food and bioprocess engineering is the application of engineering 
principles to produce, preserve, process, package, and distribute 
foods. Food and bioprocess engineers develop, design, and construct 
new machinery, processes, and plants; they develop and test new 
products; they preserve and distribute foods; and they manage envi- 
ronmental factors, waste products, and energy. Food and bioprocess 
engineers participate in nearly every phase of food processing. Gradu- 
ates are prepared for positions in a variety of industries, including 
food, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology industries. Job opportuni- 
ties also exist with the government, universities, and consulting firms. 
Career possibilities include research and development; project, pro- 
cess, and plant engineering, which can include design, optimization, 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



89 



and construction; technical sales and service; and supervision and 
management. Those who continue their education in graduate school 
will have a strong background for further study in the sciences or 
engineering. 

First year 



HOURS 

1 
3 
1 


3 

5 
4 
17 

HOURS 

3 



3 
2 
4 
16 



FIRST SEMESTER 

AG E 100 — Introduction to Agricultural Engineering 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

CHEM 105— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 1 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 

Physical Version) 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

MATH 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 231 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 

3 ECON 103 — Macroeconomic Principles 2 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

3 MCBIO 100— Introductory Microbiology 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 
2-3 T A M 150— Introduction to Statics or T A M 152— 

Engineering Mechanics, I-Statics 

16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 AG E 222 — Engineering for Bioprocessing and 
Bioenvironmental Systems 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 
Functions 

MCBIO 101 — Introductory Experimental Microbiology 
PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 
T A M 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II-Dynamics 
Total 



2 
4 
3 
16 

Third year 



HOURS 

3 
4 
3 
6 
16 

HOURS 
1 

4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CH E 261 — Introduction to Chemical Engineering 
FSHN 314— Food Chemistry and Nutrition, I 
T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 
Electives in social sciences or humanities 2 ' 4 
Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

AG E 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 

CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electrical and Electronic Circuits 

FSHN 371/MCBIO 311— Food and Industrial Microbiology 

Free elective 4 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 ' 4 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 AG E 383 — Engineering Properties of Food Materials 

4 CH E 371— Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 

3 FSHN 361— Food Processing, I 

4 Technical elective 3 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 ' 4 
17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 AG E 299— Undergraduate Thesis 

2 AG E 385 — Food and Process Engineering Design 

4 CH E 373— Mass Transfer Operations 

3 FSHN 362— Food Processing, II 
3 Free elective 4 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 ' 4 

17 Total 



1. Students may take SPCOM 111 and 112 in place of RHET 105. 

2. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
Collegeof Engineering, including ECON 102 or 1 03, and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

3. Students select technical electives from the approved list for food and bioprocess 
engineering. 

4. Oneelective course must satisfy the general education Composition II requirement. 

Food and Bioprocess Engineering Electives 



HOURS 

3-4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3-4 



3 
3 
3.5 

3 
2 



TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

AG E 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 

AG E 315 — Applied Machine Vision 

AG E 387 — Grain Drying and Conditioning 

AG E 389— Process Design for Corn Milling 

AG E 396 — Special Problems (Package Engineering) 

CEE 293 — Engineering Modeling Under Uncertainty, I E 

230— Analysis of Data, or STAT 310/MATH 363— 

Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Probability, I 

CH E 389 — Chemical Process Control and Dynamics 

G E 288 — Engineering Economy and Operations Research 

M E 261 — Fundamentals of Signal Processing, 

Instrumentation, and Control 

M E 271 — Mechanical Design, I 

MCBIO 312 — Techniques of Applied Microbiology 

Other electives, subject to approval 



CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Ceramic Engineering in no longer 
offered. Students interested in the field of ceramic engineering should 
consider the ceramics option in the degree for materials science and 
engineering. Additional information may be obtained from the De- 
partment of Materials Science and Engineering. 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL 
ENGINEERING 

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering 

1114 Newmark Civil Engineering Laboratory 

205 North Mathews Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-8038 

URL: http://cee.ce.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil and 
Environmental Engineering 

The civil and environmental engineering curriculum provides a strong 
foundation in the engineering sciences and their applications to the 
planning, design, and construction of bridges, buildings, dams, hy- 
draulic structures, transportation facilities, environmental engineer- 
ing systems, and many other civil engineering projects that enhance 
the quality of life. The flexibility of the civil and environmental 
engineering curriculum permits a student to pursue either a broad 
program representing most of the principal areas of civil engineering 
or a more specialized program in one or more technical specialty 
areas. 

The curriculum requires 133 hours for graduation. 

PROGRAM REVIEW AND APPROVAL 

Each student's academic program is developed in close consultation 
with the student's faculty adviser to be in compliance with the general 
requirements of this curriculum and in consonance with the elaborat- 
ing guidelines of the department. To ensure that the individual 
academic programs thus developed do not abuse the substantial 
degree of electivity that is present in the curriculum, each student's 
academic program must be reviewed and approved by a standing 
committee of the faculty before it is accepted as qualifying for the 
degree of B.S. in civil and environmental engineering. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

3 G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

15 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



90 



HOURS 

3 




3 
4 
4 
15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102 — General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 

Physical Version) 

CEE 195 — Introduction to Civil Engineering 

MATH 130 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS 

3 

2 
3 
4 
3 
3 
18 

HOURS 

3 

3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
16 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112 — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

T A M 152 — Engineering Mechanics, I-Statics 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CEE 292 — Planning, Design, and Management of Civil 

Engineering Systems 

CEE 293 — Engineering Modeling under Uncertainty 

PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

PHYCS 114 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

T A M 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II-Dynamics 

T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Materials 

Total 



HOURS 

3 

4 
4 
3 
3 
17 

HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
6 
18 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 

T A M 235 — Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 

Civil and environmental engineering core course 2 

Civil and environmental engineering core course 2 

Mathematics, basic sciences, or engineering sciences elective 3 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Civil and environmental engineering core course 2 

Civil and environmental engineering core course 2 

Mathematics, basic sciences, or engineering sciences elective 3 

Technical elective 4 

Electives in social sciences or humanities 1 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 Civil and environmental engineering core course 2 

3 Technical elective 4 

3 Technical elective 4 

3 B&T W 261 — Technical and Scientific Communication 5 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

3 Free elective 6 

CEE 295 — Professional Practice 

18 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 Technical elective 4 
3 Technical elective 4 
3 Technical elective 4 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

3 Free elective 6 

16 Total 

1. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering, including ECON 102 or 103, and thecampus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

2. Each student's program must include at least five civil and environmental 
engineering core courses, totaling at least 15 hours, selected from the deparrmentally 
approved list that follows. 

3. Each student is required to select at least 6 hours of deparrmentally approved 
electives in mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering sciences (see the Civil and 
Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Student Handbook). 

4. Technical electives must be selected in accord with departmental guidelines (see 
elaborating statement that follows). 

5. This course satisfies the general education Composition II requirement. 

6. Subject to constraints imposed by the college, each program may contain up to 6 
hours of free electives. 



HOURS CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CORE 

COURSES 

15-17 Five courses must be selected from among the courses 

contained in the following list: 

4 CEE 201 — Engineering Surveying 

4 CEE 210— Behavior of Materials/T A M 224— 

Mechanical Behavior of Materials 
3 CEE 216 — Construction Engineering 

3 CEE 220 — Materials for Transportation Facilities 

3 CEE 241 — Environmental Qualify Engineering 

3 CEE 255 — Introduction to Hydrosystems 

Engineering 
3 CEE 261 — Introduction to Structural Engineering 

3 CEE 280 — Introduction to Soil Mechanics and 

Foundation Engineering 

HOURS TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

35 Civil and environmental engineering core courses and 

technical electives. Technical electives must be selected from 
deparrmentally approved lists and be in accordance with 
guidelines established by the department in each of the 
following two categories. 

12 min Primary Area of Emphasis: Selected from among the courses 

offered in one of the technical specialty areas in which 
instruction is offered in this department (see the following 
listing). 

6 min Secondary Area of Emphasis: Selected from some technical 

area other than the student's primary area of emphasis. The 
secondary emphasis area is commonly another technical 
specialty in civil and environmental engineering; students may 
broaden their basic interests and competencies by selecting 
secondary areas that are outside of civil and environmental 
engineering but that relate to and support their areas of 
primary interests. 

It is further required that the courses selected as technical electives, together 
with those chosen as civil and environmental engineering core courses, satisfy 
the following minimum engineering design content criteria: 

HOURS 

16 Cumulative engineering design content in each student's 

program, where the number of hours of design content in each 
civil and environmental engineering course are specified by the 
department in listings of course contents. 
Each student must complete at least one course that requires 
completion by the student of an integrated design project. The 
courses that meet this criterion are determined by the 
department faculty and are identified in the Civil and 
Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Student Handbook. 

Explicit guidelines for the selection of technical electives in primary and secondary 
categories, together with suggested courses in each of the available technical 
specialty areas in civil and environmental engineering, are published by the 
department in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Student 
Handbook. 

TECHNICAL EMPHASIS AREAS 

Extensive programs of instruction are available in each of the follow- 
ing technical specialty areas: 

Construction management 

Construction materials 

Environmental engineering 

General civil engineering 

Geotechnical engineering 

Hydrosystems engineering 

Structural engineering 

Transportation engineering 

CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

155 Everitt Laboratory 

1406 West Green Street 

Urbana IL 61801 

217-333-2300 

URL: http://www.ece.uiuc.edu/ 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering 

The computer engineering curriculum, which is administered by the 
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), stresses 
scientific principles, rigorous analysis, creative design, clear commu- 
nication, and responsible teamwork. Students will gain the funda- 
mental knowledge, practical skills, professional attitudes, and experi- 
ences that provide a broad foundation for further learning during 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
91 



productive careers in computer engineering. In consultation with 
their faculty advisers, students choose electives to prepare for imme- 
diate employment, graduate study, or both. While the course of study 
is designed primarily to prepare students for careers closely allied 
with computer engineering, it also provides a valuable understanding 
of science and technology for those who will pursue careers in other 
professions. The curriculum also meets the requirements of the Ac- 
creditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FIRST YEAR ECE EXPERIENCE 

First year students take ECE 110, Introduction to Electrical and Com- 
puter Engineering, a four-credit-hour class combining theory, labora- 
tory measurement, and design. Not only do beginning students get a 
substantive course in their major, they also gain a better appreciation 
for the basic science and mathematics courses that are taken during 
the first two years of study. Students gain firsthand experience in the 
activities of a professional computer engineer and are better able to 
make the important decision as to whether they have chosen the major 
best suited to them. 

INTELLECTUAL CONTENT OF THE COMPUTER 
ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Student involvement in the computer engineering discipline increases 
during each year of the program. Most of the core computer engineer- 
ing courses are taken in the fourth, fifth, and sixth semesters. During 
the last two semesters, the student chooses electives so as to define a 
curriculum meeting specific educational and career needs. 

The computer engineering core curriculum focuses on fundamen- 
tal computer engineering knowledge: circuits (ECE 110), systems 
(ECE 210), electromagnetics (ECE 229), computer engineering (ECE 
249, ECE 290, ECE 291, ECE 312), solid state electronics (ECE 340) and 
computer science (C S 125, C S 225). The rich set of ECE elective courses 
permits students to concentrate in any subdiscipline of computer 
engineering including: computer systems, electronic circuits, soft- 
ware, theory, computer networks, artificial intelligence and robotics, 
and engineering applications. 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND DESIGN EXPERIENCE 

Instruction is given using a combination of lecture, discussion, labo- 
ratory, and project methodologies of the highest quality. The large 
number of laboratory courses and superb access to advanced com- 
puter facilities provide excellent practical experience in the field. 
Engineering design, communication, and teamwork are integrated 
throughout the curriculum, including the beginning required courses 
Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE 110) and 
Introduction to Computer Engineering (ECE 290), as well as Com- 
puter Engineering II (ECE 291 ), Digital Systems Laboratory (ECE 249), 
and Computer Organization and Design (ECE 312), which are taken 
in the third year. Further design experiences occur in the elective 
courses. 

HONORS ACTIVITY 

Students wishing to do honors work are encouraged to apply to the 
James Scholar Program administered jointly by the College of Engi- 
neering and the ECE Department. In consultation with departmental 
honors advisers, students create and carry out honors activity con- 
tracts. They must also participate in the ECE Honors Seminar and are 
encouraged to participate in the yearly Undergraduate Honors Sym- 
posium. The department offers thesis courses and project opportuni- 
ties for students wishing to graduate with Highest Honors. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have a grade point average of at least 2.0 (A=4.0) in 
ECE courses in order to remain in good standing and to graduate. To 
qualify for registration for the ECE courses shown in the third year of 
the curriculum, a student must have completed, with a combined 2.25 
grade point average, the mathematics, physics, computer science, and 
electrical and computer engineering courses shown in the first two 
years. 

OVERVIEW OF CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation and is organized as 
follows: 

Required Courses 

Required courses total 76-77 hours. 



HOURS BASIC SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

These courses stress the scientific principles upon which the engineer- 
ing discipline is based.' 

10 Calculus for students entering with analytic geometry: 

5 MATH 135— Calculus 

5 MATH 245— Calculus II 

11 Calculus for students entering without analytic geometry: 

5 MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

3 MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 
Functions 

4 PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

4 PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

2 PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 
29-30 Total 

1. Either the MATH 120/130/242 sequence or the MATH 135/245 sequence may be 
taken according to the student's advanced placement status and score on the 
mathematics placement exam. 

HOURS COMPUTER ENGINEERING CORE 

These courses stress fundamental computer engineering concepts 
and basic laboratory techniques that comprise the common intellec- 
tual understanding of all computer engineering. 

4 ECE 110 — Introduction to Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 

4 ECE 210 — Analog Signal Processing 

3 ECE 229 — Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields 

2 ECE 249— Digital Systems Laboratory 

3 ECE 290 — Introduction to Computer Engineering 

3 ECE 291 — Computer Engineering II 

4 ECE 312 — Computer Organization and Design 

3 ECE 340 — Solid-State Electronic Devices 

4 C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

4 C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

34 Total 

HOURS ADVANCED MATHEMATICS 

These courses provide additional sophistication for the computer 
engineer. The probability and statistics course lays the groundwork 
for understanding problems ranging from communications engineer- 
ing to data analysis in diverse areas such as medicine and manufactur- 
ing. 

3 MATH 213 — Introduction to Discrete Mathematics 

3 MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

3 ECE 313 — Probability with Engineering Applications 
Note that ECE 313 may be replaced by one of the following: 

3 I E 230— Analysis of Data 

4 STAT 310/MATH 363— Introduction to 
Mathematical Statistics and Probability, I 

9 min Total 

HOURS COMPOSITION I 

This course teaches fundamentals of expository writing. 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Technical Electives 
HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

These courses stress the rigorous analysis and design principles 
practiced in the major concentration areas of computer engineering. 
21 One course must come from a list of basic science electives. 

The remainder are upperclass electives in electrical and 
computer engineering and in computer science, to be chosen 
from a departmentally approved list. 

Social Sciences and Humanities 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

These courses ensure that students have exposure in breadth and 
depth to areas of intellectual activity that are essential to the general 
education of any college graduate. 

18 Social sciences and humanities courses approved by the 

College of Engineering. 

Other Electives 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

These electives give the student the opportunity to explore any 
intellectual area. This freedom plays a critical role in helping students 
to define what are effectively minor concentrations in areas such as 
bioengineering, technology and management, languages, or research 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



92 



specialties. At least seven hours must be taken for a grade. 
12-13 Electives 

Campus General Education Requirements. 

Students must select courses that satisfy both the College of 
Engineering's social sciences and humanities requirement and the 
campus requirements in social and behavioral sciences and in hu- 
manities and the arts. Proper choices will ensure that these courses 
also satisfy the campus requirements in the areas of Western and non- 
Western cultures. Many of these courses satisfy the campus Compo- 
sition II requirement, which ensures that the student has the advanced 
writing skills expected of all college graduates. The campus require- 
ments in composition I, natural sciences and technology, and quanti- 
tative reasoning are met by required courses. 

First Year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Introduction to Engineering 

5 MATH 135*— Calculus or MATH 120*— Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry I 

4 RHET 105— Principles of Composition or ECE 110*— 
Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 ECE 110* — Introduction to Electrical and Computer 
Engineering or RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

5 or 3 MATH 245*— Calculus II or MATH 130*— Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry II 
4 PHYCS 111*— General Physics (Mechanics) 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 

or 3 Additional elective if MATH 130 is taken instead of MATH 

245 
16 or 17 Total 

Second Year 



HOURS 

4 
3 
3 

4 
3 
17 

HOURS 

4 
3 
4 or 3 

2 
2 
15 or 14 

Third Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 125* — Introduction to Computer Science 

MATH 213* — Introduction to Discrete Mathematics 

MATH 285* — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions or MATH 242* — Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112* — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

Electives 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

ECE 210* — Analog Signal Processing 

ECE 290* — Introduction to Computer Engineering 

Electives or MATH 285* — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 

PHYCS 113* — General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

PHYCS 114* — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

Total 



HOURS 

3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
16 

HOURS 

4 
4 
3 
5 
16 

Fourth Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ECE 229 — Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields 

ECE 249 — Digital Systems Laboratory 

ECE 291 — Computer Engineering II 

ECE 313** — Probability with Engineering Applications 

ECE 340— Solid-State Electronic Devices 

Electives 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

C S 225— Data Structures and Software Principles 
ECE 312 — Computer Organization and Design 
MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 
Electives 
Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

16 Electives 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

16 Electives 

" 2.25 GPA rule course 

** May be replaced by one of the following: I E 230 — Analysis of Data or STAT 310/ 

MATH 363 — Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Probability, 1. 



CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Department of Computer Science 

2270 Digital Computer Laboratory 

1304 West Springfield Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-4428 

URL: http://www.cs.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

This curriculum is offered by the Department of Computer Science for 
students seeking a broad and deep knowledge of the theory, design, 
and application of digital computers and information processing 
techniques. The first two years are spent on basic work in mathemat- 
ics, physics, and an introduction to the fundamental areas of computer 
science: computing, programming, the organization of digital ma- 
chines, hardware, numerical analysis, artificial intelligence, and theory 
of computation. The third year completes the work in basic computer 
science and requires electives to broaden the background of the 
student. During the fourth year, the student is encouraged to deepen 
his or her understanding of topics of particular interest and ability. 

To qualify for registration in the computer science courses speci- 
fied in the first semester of the junior year, a student must have a 
combined grade point average of 2.25 (A = 4.0) in the mathematics, 
physics, and computer science courses that are required in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

In order to graduate or continue in the computer science curricu- 
lum, a student must have a 2.0 technical grade point average including 
the following courses: 

All computer science courses 

ECE 205, 206 

MATH 120, 130, and 242 or 243; or MATH 135 and 245 

MATH 225 or 315 

MATH 285 or 341 

MATH 361 /STAT 351 or MATH 363/STAT 310 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

First year 



HOURS 

3 
1 
1 

2 

5 
4 
16 

HOURS 

4 
3 
4 
5 
16 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

C S 100 — Freshman Orientation in Computer Science 1 

C S 173 — Discrete Mathematical Structures 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Electives 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

4 C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

3 C S 273 — Introduction to Theory of Computation 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

4 PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 Electives 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 C S 231 — Computer Architecture, I 

2 MATH 225— Introductory Matrix Theory 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 
Functions 

PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 2 
Electives 
Total 



2 
6 
16 

Third year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 C S 232— Computer Architecture, II 

3 C S 257— Numerical Methods 

3 MATH 361— Introduction to Probability Theory, I 

2 PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 2 

3 Application sequence 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



93 



2 
16 

HOURS 

3 
3 
1 

3 
3 
3 
16 

Fourth year 



Other electives 
Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

C S 323' — Operating System Design 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 

Computer Science elective 

Application sequence 

Other electives 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 C S 321 — Programming Languages and Compilers 

3 C S 292 — Senior Project in Computer Science, I 3 

3 Computer science electives 

3 Application sequence 

4 Other electives 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 C S 293 — Senior Project in Computer Science, IP 

6 Computer science electives 

3 Application sequence 

4 Other electives 
16 Total 



1 . This course is highly recommended for freshmen, who may use it to help meet free 
elective requirements. 

2. Either PHYCS 113 or PHYCS 114may be replaced by a physical or biological science 
course from an approved list available in the department. 

3. Or C S 299 — Senior Thesis or free elective 

OVERVIEW OF CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation and is organized as 



follows: 

HOURS 

10-11 



2-3 

3 

3-4 

12 

4 
4 

18 
56-59 



BASIC MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Math through 242, 243, or 245 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry. Choice of math sequence depends on placement 

test results. 

MATH 225 or 315— Linear Algebra 

MATH 285 or 341— Differential Equations 

MATH 361/STAT 351 or MATH 363/STAT 310— Probability 

or Statistics 

PHYCS 111, 112, 113 1 , 114 1 

CHEM 101 and 105 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Social sciences and humanities electives 

Subtotal 



1. Either PHYCS 1 13 or PHYCS 114 may be replaced by a physical or biological science 
course from an approved list available in the department. 



HOURS 

1 
4 
4 
3 
6 
2 
3 



27 



COMPUTER SCIENCE CORE REQUIREMENTS 

C S 100 — Freshman Orientation in Computer Science 1 

C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

C S 257— Numerical Methods 

C S 231 and 232— Computer Architecture I and II 

C S 173 — Discrete Mathematical Structures 

C S 273 — Introduction to Theory of Computation 

ECE 205 and 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic 

Circuits and Laboratory 

Subtotal 



1. Recommended for beginning freshmen. 

300-LEVEL COMPUTER SCIENCE ELECTIVES 

At least six 300-level courses in computer science, including: 

Software Both C S 321 and C S 323 

Architecture Either C S 331 or C S 333 

Foundations Either C S 373 or C S 375 

Two more C S courses numbered 311-389 or 397 

HOURS SENIOR PROJECT OR SENIOR THESIS 

0-6 C S 292-293 or 299 (optional) 

NOTE: Fulfills Composition II requirement. If not taken, another course from the 
campus Composition II list must be taken to satisfy the requirement. 



HOURS APPLICATION SEQUENCE 

12 A sequence of courses directed toward study of a specific 

problem area related to computer use. This sequence must be 
taken from the list approved by the department. 
Alternatively, a special sequence may be taken, provided it is 
approved by the director of undergraduate programs of the 
department. 

HOURS FREE ELECTIVES 

6-16 Additional course work so that there are at least 128 credit 

hours. 

HONORS 

For graduation with highest honors, a student must complete at least 
2 hours of C S 290— Individual Study, C S 292-293— Senior Project, or 
C S 299 — Senior Thesis and must obtain the favorable recommenda- 
tion of the instructor(s) in addition to all other requirements of the 
College of Engineering. 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

155 Everitt Laboratory 

1406 West Green Street 

Urbana IL 61801 

217-333-2300 

URL: http://www.ece.uiuc.edu/ 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

PURPOSE 

The electrical engineering curriculum, which is administered by the 
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), stresses 
scientific principles, rigorous analysis, creative design, clear commu- 
nication, and responsible teamwork. Students will gain the funda- 
mental knowledge, practical skills, professional attitudes, and experi- 
ences that provide a broad foundation for further learning during 
productive careers in electrical engineering. In consultation with their 
faculty advisers, students choose electives to prepare for immediate 
employment, graduate study, or both. While the course of study is 
designed primarily to prepare students for careers closely allied with 
electrical engineering, it also provides a valuable understanding of 
science and technology for those who will pursue careers in law, 
medicine, commerce, and other professions. The curriculum also 
meets the requirements of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET). 

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FIRST YEAR ECE EXPERIENCE 

First year students take ECE 110 — Introduction to Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, a four-credit hour class combining theory, 
laboratory measurement, and design. Not only do beginning students 
get a substantive course in their major, they also gain a better appre- 
ciation for the basic science and mathematics courses that are taken 
during the first two years of study. Students gain firsthand experience 
in the activities of a professional electrical engineer and are better able 
to make the important decision as to whether they have chosen the 
major best suited to them. 

INTELLECTUAL CONTENT OF THE ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

Student involvement in the electrical engineering discipline increases 
during each year of the program. Most of the core electrical engineer- 
ing courses are taken in the fourth and fifth semesters. During the last 
three semesters the student chooses electives so as to define a curricu- 
lum to meet specific educational and career needs. 

The electrical engineering core curriculum focuses on fundamen- 
tal electrical engineering knowledge: circuits (ECE 1 10), systems (ECE 
210), electromagnetics (ECE 229), solid state electronics (ECE 340), 
computer engineering (ECE 290, ECE 249), computer science (C S 125), 
and design (ECE 345). The rich set of ECE elective courses permits 
students to study in any subdiscipline of electrical engineering includ- 
ing: acoustics, bioengineering, circuits, communications, control, 
electromagnetics, physical electronics, power, signal processing, and 
space science and remote sensing. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



94 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND DESIGN EXPERIENCE 

Instruction is given using a combination of lecture, discussion, labo- 
ratory, and project methodologies of the highest quality. The large 
number of laboratory courses and superb access to advanced com- 
puter facilities provide excellent practical experience in the field. 
Laboratory and design work are emphasized throughout the curricu- 
lum beginning with Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering (ECE 110). The sophomore year includes design experience in 
Introduction to Computer Engineering (ECE 290) and the Digital 
Systems Laboratory (ECE 249). During the junior and senior years, 
students gain further design experience in elective courses, including 
at least two laboratory courses, in their chosen subdiscipline. In the 
Senior Design Project Laboratory (ECE 345), students learn to com- 
bine all phases of an engineering project including design, analysis, 
construction, teamwork, and reporting. 

HONORS ACTIVITY 

Students wishing to do honors work are encouraged to apply to the 
James Scholar Program administered jointly by the College of Engi- 
neering and the ECE Department. In consultation with departmental 
honors advisers, students create and carry out honors activity con- 
tracts. They must also participate in the ECE Honors Seminar and are 
encouraged to participate in the yearly Undergraduate Honors Sym- 
posium. The department offers thesis courses and project opportuni- 
ties for students wishing to graduate with Highest Honors. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A student must have a grade point average of at least 2.0 (A=4.0) in 
ECE courses in order to remain in good standing and to graduate. To 
qualify for registration for the ECE courses shown in the third year of 
the curriculum, a student must have completed, with a combined 2.25 
grade point average, the mathematics, physics, computer science, and 
electrical and computer engineering courses shown in the first two 
years. 

OVERVIEW OF CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation and is organized as 
follows: 

Required Courses 

Required courses total 61 or 62 hours. 

HOURS BASIC SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

These courses stress the scientific principles upon which the engineer- 
ing discipline is based. 1 

10 Calculus for students entering with analytic geometry: 

5 MATH 135— Calculus 

5 MATH 245— Calculus II 

11 Calculus for students entering without analytic geometry: 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

3 MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

3 MATH 285— Differential Equations 

4 PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

4 PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

2 PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

29-30 Total 



1. Either the MATH 120/130/242 sequence or the MATH 135/245 sequence maybe 
taken according to the student's advanced placement status and score on the 
mathematics placement exam. 

HOURS ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CORE 

These courses stress fundamental electrical engineering concepts and 
basic laboratory techniques that comprise the common intellectual 
understanding of all electrical engineering. 
4 ECE 110 — Introduction to Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 
4 ECE 210 — Analog Signal Processing 

3 ECE 229 — Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields 

2 ECE 249— Digital Systems Laboratory 

3 ECE 290 — Introduction to Computer Engineering 

3 ECE 340— Solid State Electronic Devices 

2 ECE 345 — Senior Design Project Laboratory 

4 C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 
25 Total 



HOURS PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 

This course lays the groundwork for understanding problems rang- 
ing from communications engineering to data analysis in diverse 
areas such as medicine and manufacturing. 
3 ECE 313 — Probability with Engineering Applications 

Note that ECE 313 may be replaced by one of the following: 

3 I E 230 — Analysis of Data 

4 STAT 310/MATH 363— Introduction to 
Mathematical Statistics and Probability, I 

3 min Total 

HOURS COMPOSITION I 

This course teaches fundamentals of expository writing. 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Engineering & Science Electives 

The engineering and science electives total 37 hours. 

ECE ELECTIVES 

These upperclass electives stress the rigorous analysis and design 
principles practiced in the subdisciplines of electrical engineering. 
The electives total 22 hours distributed as follows. 

HOURS RESTRICTED ECE ELECTIVES 

The following five course selections are introductory to major speci- 
ality areas of electrical engineering. 

Students must take three of the following: 
4 ECE 310— Digital Signals and Systems 

3 ECE 330 — Power Circuits and Electromechanics 

3 ECE 350— Lines, Fields and Waves 

4 ECE 342— Electronic Circuits and ECE 343— 
Electronic Circuits Laboratory 

3-4 ECE 291— Computer Engineering, II or C S 225— 
Data Structures and Software Principles 

ECE ELECTIVE LABORATORIES 

The elective laboratory courses provide the student with essential 
hands-on experience in techniques and design that are important for 
the practicing engineer as well as the research scientist. Students 
choose two courses from a departmentally approved list. One lab 
must not be on the list of Restricted ECE Electives. 

OTHER ECE ELECTIVES 

With these courses a student defines her or his interest area within the 
field of electrical engineering. Elective choice should be chosen with 
care, planning, and consultation with an adviser. Consult also the 
advising materials for all the subdisciplines of electrical engineering. 
These courses make up the balance of the 22 ECE elective hours and 
can be taken from a departmentally approved list including almost all 
of the 200- and 300-level ECE courses. 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Technical electives total 15 hours. This elective requirement gives each 
student freedom to define a technical course of study of considerable 
breadth or focus. Courses are taken from a departmentally approved 
list that includes courses in ECE, other engineering departments, and 
the basic sciences and mathematics departments. 

Social Sciences and Humanities 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

These courses ensure that students have exposure in breadth and 
depth to areas of intellectual activity that are essential to the general 
education of any college graduate. 

18 Social sciences and humanities courses approved by the 

College of Engineering. 

Other Electives 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

These electives give the student the opportunity to explore any 
intellectual area. This freedom plays a critical role in helping students 
define what are effectively minor concentrations in areas such as 
bioengineering, technology and management, languages, or research 
specialties. At least six hours must be taken for a letter grade. 
11-12 Electives 

Campus General Education Requirements 

Students must select courses that satisfy both the college social sci- 
ences and humanities requirement and the campus requirements in 
social and behavioral sciences and in humanities and the arts. Proper 
choices will ensure that these courses also satisfy the campus require- 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



95 



merits in the areas of Western and non-Western cultures. Many of 
these courses satisfy the campus composition II requirement, which 
ensures that the student has the advanced writing skills expected of all 
college graduates. The campus requirements in composition I, natural 
sciences and technology, and quantitative reasoning are met by re- 
quired courses. 

First Year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Introduction to Engineering 

5 MATH 135*— Calculus or MATH 120*— Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry, I 

4 RHET 105— Principles of Composition or ECE 110*— 
Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 ECE 110* — Introduction to Electrical and Computer 
Engineering or RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

5 or 3 MATH 245*— Calculus, II or MATH 130*— Calculus and 

Analytic Geometry, II 
4 PHYCS 111*— General Physics (Mechanics) 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 

or 3 Additional elective if MATH 130 is taken instead of MATH 

245 
16 or 17 Total 

Second Year 



HOURS 

4 
3 

4 
6 
17 

HOURS 

4 
3 
2 
2 
4 or 3 

15 or 14 
Third Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 125* — Introduction to Computer Science 

MATH 285* — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions or MATH 242* — Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112*— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

Electives 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

ECE 210* — Analog Signal Processing 

ECE 290* — Introduction to Computer Engineering 

PHYCS 113*— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

PHYCS 114*— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

Electives or MATH 285* — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 

Total 



HOURS 

3 
2 
3 

3 
5 
16 

HOURS 

6 

10 

16 

Fourth Year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ECE 229 — Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields 

ECE 249 — Digital Systems Laboratory 

ECE 313** — Probabilistic Methods of Signal and System 

Analysis 

ECE 340 — Solid State Electronic Devices 

Electives 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 
Advanced Core ECE Courses 
Electives 
Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 ECE 345 — Senior Design Project Laboratory 

3 Advanced ECE Core Courses 
11 Electives 

16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

16 Electives 

* 2.25 GPA rule courses 

** May be replaced by one of the following: I E 230— Analysis of Data or STAT 310/ 

MATH 363 — Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Probability, I. 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

216 Talbot Laboratory 

104 South Wright Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-2322 

Fax: (217) 244-5707 

URL: http://www.tam.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering Mechanics 

This curriculum is designed primarily for students intending to 
pursue careers in research and development in mechanical, civil, 
aerospace, and related engineering fields. It is a rigorous, analytical, 
science-oriented curriculum with emphasis on applied mathematics 
and physical theory. At the same time, it is an accredited engineering 
program. Engineering mechanics provides excellent preparation for 
graduate study in mechanics and related areas — indeed, about half of 
our graduates continue immediately on to graduate school. 

Mechanics pervades modern research and development problems 
in such areas as energy, materials, space technology and exploration, 
electronic packaging, fluidics, computer-aided design, MEMS, and 
biomechanics. To address this wide variety of disciplines, the engi- 
neering mechanics curriculum is organized around a core of basic 
science and engineering courses that are fundamental to mostbranches 
of engineering. The use of computers is emphasized, both in the 
laboratories and in several courses. Design experiences are integrated 
throughout the curriculum, beginning with a one-hour freshman 
Discovery Program course and ending with an interdisciplinary six- 
hour design sequence in the senior year. Secondary field options in 
several areas — fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, mechanics of mate- 
rials, experimental mechanics, computational mechanics, and a very 
flexible option entitled applied mathematics and engineering sci- 
ence — allow the student to tailor a program to specific areas of 
interest. 

The curriculum requires 131 hours for graduation. Complete 
listings of all courses in the Department of Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics can be found on our Web site at http: / / www.tam.uiuc.edu. 
We invite inquiries from prospective students and would be pleased 
to arrange a visit to the department. 

First year 



HOURS 

3 
1 


3 
5 
4 
1 
17 

HOURS 

3 



3 
4 
3 
3 
17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

CHEM 105— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

T A M 195 — Mechanics in the Modern World 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 

Physical Version) 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Engineering and Physical Science 

3 MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

4 PHYCS 112 — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 
3 T A M 152 — Engineering Mechanics, I-Statics 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 MATH 280— Advanced Calculus 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

2 PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

3 T A M 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II-Dynamics 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



96 



3 

1 
3 
17 

Third year 



T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 
T A M 222 — Solid Mechanics Design 
Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 
Total 



HOURS 

3 

3 

3 

4 

4 

17 

HOURS 

3 

3 

4 

4 

3 

17 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

MATH 341— Differential Equations 

M E 205 — Thermodynamics 

T A M 224 — Mechanical Behavior of Materials 

T A M 235 — Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

T A M 292 — Design and Analysis in Engineering Practice 

T A M 312 — Intermediate Dynamics and Vibrations 

T A M 360 — Introduction to Continuum Mechanics 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 T A M 370 — Introduction to Computational Mechanics 

3 Senior design elective 2 

3 Secondary field elective 3 

3 Secondary field elective 3 

3 Free elective 

15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 Senior design elective 2 

3 Secondary field elective 

3 Secondary field elective 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 

3 Free elective 

15 Total 

1. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering and the campus general education requirements for social 
sciences and humanities. 

2. See section in Senior Design Electives. 

3. See section in Secondary Field Electives. 

SECONDARY FIELD OPTIONS 

Each student, in consultation with a faculty adviser, selects a second- 
ary field option in which further specialization in mechanics is pur- 
sued. Each secondary field consists of 12 hours of course work in 
technical courses in mechanics and closely related subjects. Each 
secondary field option specifies two required courses and provides a 
list of approved elective courses. 

SOLID MECHANICS 

Required courses: 

TAM 321 — Intermediate Solid Mechanics 

T A M 324 — Flow and Fracture of Structural Metals 

Approved elective courses: 

*A A E 221; CEE 261, 263, 264; C S/MATH 257; ECE/T A M 373, T A M 299 



FLUID MECHANICS 

Required courses: 

TAM 335 — Intermediate Fluid Mechanics 

M E 305 — Intermediate Gas Dynamics 

Approved elective courses: 

*A A E 311; CEE 345, 351, 356; ECE/T A M 373; M E/T A M 308; T A M 299 

EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS 

Required courses: 

TAM 326 — Experimental Stress Analysis 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits Laboratory 

Approved elective courses: 

C S/MATH 257; ECE/T A M 373; *M E 261; PHYCS 371; T A M 299 

COMPUTATIONAL MECHANICS 

Required courses: 

C S/MATH 257— Numerical Methods 

M E 345/CSE 351— Introduction to Finite Element Analysis 

Approved elective courses: 

C S 300, 350, 358, 359; T A M 299 



MECHANICS OF MATERIALS 

Required courses: 

TAM 324 — Flow and Fracture of Structural Metals 

T A M/A A E 327 — Deformation and Fracture of Polymeric Materials or T A 

M/A A E 328 — Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials 
Approved elective courses: 
BIOEN 308; CEE 220; MATSE 301/CHEM 245, MATSE 344/CEE 375, 

MATSE 346; NUC E 331; TAM 299 



ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

Required courses: 

MATH 342 — Fourier Series and Boundary Value Problems 

MATH 346 — Complex Variables and Applications or MATH 348 — 

Introduction to Higher Analysis: Complex Variables 
Approved elective courses: 
A A E 251, 306; CEE 293; ECE 229, 330; ECE/T A M 373; MATH 323, 347, 351, 

382, 384, 385, 388; PHYCS 371; STAT 310/MATH 363, STAT 

311/MATH 364; TAM 299 



•Requires instructor's permission but engineering mechanics students generally have 
the necessary preparation. 

Substitutions 

To add flexibility to the program and to accommodate particular 
interests, a student may petition the Department to substitute appro- 
priate courses, including 400-level courses if the student has the 
appropriate preparation, for any portion of the elective secondary- 
field courses. Petitions to substitute courses should be submitted 
through the student affairs coordinator and require approval by the 
student's adviser, the chief undergraduate adviser, and the associate 
head of the department. A list of substitutions that have been ap- 
proved is maintained by the student affairs coordinator. Without 
petition, a student may replace one of the approved elective courses 
for a chosen secondary field with any required course from another 
secondary field. 

SENIOR DESIGN ELECTIVES 

The senior design electives consist of 6 hours of engineering course 
work — 3 hours in an engineering capstone design course, such as A A 
E 240, AG E 336, CH E 377, CEE 320, CEE 353, CEE 365, C S 292, ECE 
345, G E 242, MATSE 322, M E 280, or NUC E 358, plus 3 hours in an 
engineering technical elective course that is directly related to the 
intended area of concentration in that design course. In most cases, the 
capstone design course is taken in the last semester of study. A faculty 
design sequence coordinator, named by the department head, must 
approve each student's senior design electives. 

CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS* 

Department of Physics 

290 Y Loomis Laboratory 

1110 West Green Street 

Urbana, IL 61801-3080 

(217) 333-3114 

Fax: (217) 333-9819 

E-mail: undergrad-info@physics.uiuc.edu 

URL: http://web.physics.uiuc.edu/education/undergrad/ 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 

This curriculum provides broad, thorough training in fundamental 
physics and mathematics to prepare students for graduate study in 
physics and related fields and for research and development positions 
in industrial and governmental laboratories. For the first two years, 
the curriculum follows the common engineering program. In the last 
two years, the emphasis is on advanced courses in physics and 
mathematics, with an allowance for electives. 

To remain in good academic standing, a student continuing in or 
transferring to this curriculum must have (1) a grade point average of 
2.5 (A = 4.0) in all University subjects exclusive of military science, 
physical education, and band; (2) a grade point average of at least 2.5 
in all 100- and 200-level courses in mathematics and physics; and (3) 
a separate grade point average of at least 2.5 for all 300-level math- 
ematics and physics courses. This grade point average must include at 
least two physics courses. A transfer student must have a correspond- 
ing record in the institution from which he or she has transferred and 
must maintain such status at UIUC. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



97 



Students with proficiency or Advanced Placement (AP) credit for 
MATH 120 are strongly encouraged to enroll in MATH 130 and 
PHYCS 111 for the first semester. Entering freshmen should enroll for 
the fall term in PHYCS 199B, where they will meet with faculty 
members and other physics majors. 

The illustrative schedule that follows shows the required courses 
in a four-year program. A minimum of 128 hours is required for 
graduation. However, many students take these courses in a different 
order and take additional courses at their discretion. The program 
includes 37 hours of electives, 18 of which must be chosen from the 
College of Engineering list of approved electives in the social sciences 
and humanities. The remaining 19 hours include 6 hours of free 
electives and 13 hours of technical or nontechnical electives, of which 
at least 6 hours must be nontechnical and at least 4 technical. For this 
curriculum, technical electives are defined as most courses within the 
areas of physics, mathematics, astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chem- 
istry, computer science, and engineering. Among the 37 elective 
hours, one course must satisfy the general education Composition II 
requirement. (See the section on requirements elsewhere in this cata- 
log.) 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

'See also the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum in 
physics and the curriculum in science and letters with a major in 
physics elsewhere in this catalog. 

First year 



HOURS 

3 

1 



3 

5 

(1) 

4 

16 

HOURS 

3 



3 
4 
6 

17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry 1 

CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 1 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 2 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, P 

PHYCS 199B— Physics Orientation 4 (fall only) 

RHET 105— Principles of Composition, or RHET 108— Forms 

of Composition 5 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102— General Chemistry 1 (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory 1 (Biological or 

Physical Version) 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 3 

Electives in social sciences or humanities, or elective 

satisfying Composition II requirements 6 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS 

3 

3 
4 
6 
16 

HOURS 

3 

2 
2 
3 
6 
16 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112 — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

Electives in social sciences or humanities 6 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions' 

PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

PHYCS 114 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

PHYCS 225 — Intermediate Mechanics and Relativity, I 

Electives in social sciences or humanities 6 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 MATH 280— Advanced Calculus 

3 PHYCS 301— Classical Physics Lab 8 

3 PHYCS 326— Intermediate Mechanics and Relativity, II 

3 PHYCS 335 — Electromagnetic Fields and Sources, I' 

3 Electives 6 

15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 10 

3 PHYCS 336 — Electromagnetic Fields and Sources, II 
5 PHYCS 343— Electronic Circuits, I (spring only) 

4 PHYCS 386— Atomic Physics and Quantum Mechanics, I 11 
15 Total 



Fourth ' 


/ear 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


5 


PHYCS 303— Modern Experimental Physics, or PHYCS 344— 




Electronic Circuits, II (fall only) 


4 


PHYCS 371— Light 


4 


PHYCS 387 — Atomic Physics and Quantum Mechanics, II 


3 


Electives 6 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


4 


PHYCS 361 — Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 


13 


Electives 6 


17 


Total 



1. CHEM 107, 109, and 108, 110 may be substituted for CHEM 101/105 and 102/106 
by students who desire a more rigorous chemistry sequence. 

2. G E 103, a required course, can be delayed to the last year to take advantage of the 
latest design software before entering into professional activities or graduate studies. 

3. Students with proficiency or advanced placement (AP) credit in MATH 120 are 
strongly encouraged to enroll in MATH 130 and PHYCS 1 1 1 for the first semester. 

4. Entering freshmen are expected to enroll for the fall term in PHYCS 199B, where 
they will meet with other physics majors, learn about the University, and explore 
physics as a profession. This course maybe used to help meet free elective requirements. 

5. RHET 108 and SPCOM 111 and 112 also fulfill the graduation requirement in 
rhetoric; surplus hours will be counted as electives. 

6. See the introductory paragraph above on how electives are distributed. Note that 
one course, taken as early as possible, must satisfy the general education Composition 
II requirement. Six hours are free electives. 

7. MATH 341 and 342 may replace MATH 285; surplus hours will be counted as 
technical electives. 

8. PHYCS 301 can be taken any term after PHYCS 225 is completed. 

9. If necessary, PHYCS 335 can be taken a semester later. PHYCS 335 requires credit 
or concurrent registration in MATH 280. 

10. MATH 315 should not be replaced with MATH 225. The material in MATH 315 is 
needed for PHYCS 386. 

APPLIED PHYSICS OPTIONS 

In consultation with his or her adviser, a student may elect an applied 
physics option. These options involve subjects related to physics that 
are of an applied nature and allow the student to focus on a specialized 
area. A student must register for an option in the physics undergradu- 
ate records office, where a list of approved courses is available. 
Planning for the option should begin during the sophomore year. 
Courses in these options may be taken under the various elective 
categories, or they may be substituted for certain advanced physics 
courses approved by the adviser. Each student must satisfy the social 
sciences and humanities requirements of the College of Engineering 
and the campus general education requirements for social sciences 
and humanities. The options are as follows: 

Applied Nuclear Physics 

Bioengineering 

Fluids and Plasmas 

Optical Physics and Lasers 

Physical Electronics 

Systems Analysis and Control Theory 

CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

Department of General Engineering 

117 Transportation Building 

104 South Mathews Avenue 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-2730 

Fax: (217) 244-5705 

E-mail: program@ge.uiuc.edu 

URL: http://www.ge.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in General Engineering 

The general engineering curriculum provides a comprehensive pro- 
gram in the basic sciences, engineering sciences, and engineering 
design. The program was developed to give a broad background in 
mechanics and structures, control systems, and decision-making that 
is supportive of a systems approach to engineering. It is enriched by 
the use of computer-aided engineering tools, lab activities, and course 
experiences involving a design-build-test-evaluate ("closed-loop") 
design cycle that echoes the real world. This learning begins in the 
freshman year and culminates in an internship-like, senior-level project 
course sequence (GE 342, 343) in which student teams solve real- 
world design problems posed by external sponsors. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



98 



The curriculum also incorporates specialized study in an ap- 
proved secondary field of choice (described below) that provides 
virtually unlimited opportunity and flexibility to tailor the curricu- 
lum to one's interests. The College of Engineering's manufacturing 
option, bioengineering minor, and international minor may be incor- 
porated into the curriculum through the secondary field and other 
electives. Through the capstone project course and a senior seminar, 
the curriculum teaches the life skills necessary for success in the 
professional world. Overall, this curriculum prepares students for 
graduate study and positions of managerial and technical leadership 
in careers in the public and private sectors. 

The curriculum requires 131 hours for graduation. 

First year 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 1 


3 


CHEM 101— General Chemistry 


1 


CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 


3 


ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles, or ECON 103— 




Macroeconomic Principles (General education elective 1 ) 2 





ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 


1 


G E 100 — Introduction to General Engineering 


3 


G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 


5 


MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 3 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 




Engineering and Physical Science 


3 


MATH 130 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 


2 


MATH 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 3 


4 


PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 


4 


RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 2 


16 


Total 


Second year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


4 


ECE 110 — Introduction to Electrical and Computer 




Engineering 


3 


MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 


4 


PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 


3 


T A M 152 — Engineering Mechanics, I-Statics 


3 


Electives in social sciences or humanities 1 


17 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


G E 288 — Engineering Economy and Operations Research 


3 


MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 




Functions 


2 


PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 


3 


T A M 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II-Dynamics 


3 


T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 


3 


Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 


17 


Total 


Third year 




HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 


ECE 211 — Topics in Analog Circuits and Systems 


3 


G E 221 — Introduction to General Engineering Design 


3 


G E 222 — Design and Analysis of Dynamic Systems 


1 


G E 224 — Dynamic Systems Laboratory 


3 


Secondary field elective 4 


3 


Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 


15 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


1 


G E 225 — Instrumentation and Test Laboratory 


1 


G E 226 — Laboratory for Data Analysis 


3 


G E 232 — Engineering Design Analysis 


3 


G E 289— Probabilistic Decision-Making 


3 


G E 323 — State Space Design Methods in Control 


3 


Secondary field elective 4 


3 


Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 


17 


Total 


Fourth year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


3 


G E 292 — Engineering Law 5 


4 


T A M 235 — Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 


3 


Engineering science elective* 


3 


Secondary field elective 4 


3 


Design elective 7 


16 


Total 



HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 



3 
2 
3 
3 


G E 291 — General Engineering Seminar 

G E 342— Project Design, I 

G E 343— Project Design, II 

Secondary field elective 4 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 1 


6 


Free electives 


17 


Total 



1. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering, including ECON 102 or 103, and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

2. These two courses may be taken in reverse order depending upon RHET 105 
availability. 

3. It is recommended that freshmen with appropriate backgrounds in analytical 
geometry take the MATH 135/245 calculus sequence (10 hours) instead of MATH 
120/ 130/242 sequence (11 hours). If MATH 135/245 are taken, MATH 315 (3 hours) 
should be taken in place of MATH 225. 

4. To be selected from lists established by the department or by petition to the 
department. 

5. Satisfies the general education Composition II requirement. 

6. To be selected from the list of engineering science electives established by the 
department. 

7. To be selected from the list of design electives established by the department. 

SECONDARY FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION FOR THE 
UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

The secondary field requires a minimum of 12 hours of courses. 

Secondary fields are of two types: preapproved and customized. 
Preapproved fields have designated titles and a preapproved list of 
courses from which, in general, any 12 credit hours may be selected. 
However, substitutions of other courses may be requested via a 
petition form submitted to the department. Customized secondary 
fields may be created to fulfill student needs in areas beyond the 
preapproved ones. For customized secondary fields, a suitable title 
and all the courses must be petitioned for acceptance to the depart- 
ment. Petition approval is based on the merit of the secondary field 
and the coherence of the courses within it relative to the student's 
goals. 

Preapproved Secondary Fields 

Preapproved secondary fields are listed below. This list is subject to 
change. For the most up-to-date lists, consult http: / / www.ge.uiuc.edu. 
In several instances below, the following course substitutions may 
be used interchangeably to comply with prerequisites of listed courses: 
CEE 293, ECE 313, G E 289, 1 E 230, STAT 310/MATH 363 
CEE 292, G E 288, 1 E 210 
MATSE 306/ M E 231, T A M 224/CEE 210 
ECE 386, G E 224 and 226, M E 240 



AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERING 

ECE/G E 370/C S 343 

ECE 386 

GE389 

M E 211 1 , 213 1 ,261 1 , 303, 304 1 , 312, 313, 331, 336, 388 

T A M 312 



1. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 

BIOENGINEERING 1 (ENGINEERING OPTION) 

BIOCH 350 

BIOEN 120, 308 

BIOL 120 2 , 121 2 , 122 2 

BIOPH 301 

CHEM 231, 234 

ECE/BIOEN 314, 315, 375 

G E 293 (MHM) 

KINES 255 

PHYSL 103, 301, 302, 303, 304 

V B/BIOEN 306 



1. Students fulfilling the College of Engineering option in bioengineering will 
automatically complete this secondary field requirement. 

2. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 

BUSINESS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION AND CONSULTING 1 

ACCY 200, 201, 202 

ACCY 332/B ADM 391 

ACCY 335/B ADM 394 

B ADM 202, 210, 321, 322, 323, 345, 346 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



99 



B ADM 392/ACCY 333 

B ADM 393/ACCY 334 

B&T W 253, 261 

C S 301, 303, 304, any other 200- or 300-level courses 

C S 300/C S E 305 

C S 302/C S E 306 

G E 393 (RSC), 393 (RSL) 



1. At least one course must be chosen from the C S/CSE course group and at least one 
from the remaining group. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING STRUCTURES 

CEE 263 1 , 264, 280, 363, 364, 365, 398 (SA) 
MATH 280, 315 



1. Not recommended if GE 241 is chosen as an elective. 



ENGINEERING MARKETING 

ACCY 200, 201, 202 

ADV 281 

B ADM 202, 210, 320, 337, 344, 360, 370, 380, 382 

B&T W 253, 261 

PSYCH 245 



ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 

ACE/NRES 310/ENVST 317 

CEE 241, 336, 337, 338, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 349 

EEE 105 

ENVST/CPSC 236/CHLTH 266 

ENVST/CPSC 331/CHLTH 361 

ENVST/PSYCH 372 

NRES/CPSC/ENVST 319 

NUC E/ENVST 241 



COMMUNICATIONS AND COMPUTER SYSTEMS 

C S 225, 301, 303, 304, 311 

C S/ECE 328, 338 

ECE 371 (BW) 

G E 393 (RSC) 1 , 393 (RSL) 1 



1. Required course. 

COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING (CAD/CAM) 

C S 173, 225 1 (or C S 300VC S E 305 1 ) 

C S 318VC S E 327 1 

C S/ECE 348 

IE 350 

MFG E 210 

M E 285 1 , 366 



1. Recommended course. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 1 2 

C S 173, 225 3 (or C S 300 3 /C S E 305 3 ), any other 200- or 300-level courses 
G E 393 (RSC), 393 (RSL) 



1. Students fulfilling the College of Engineering minor in computer science will 
automatically complete the requirements of this secondary field. 

2. Students with a strong interest in courses other than C S 300-304 are encouraged to 
take C S 125 and 223 in place of C S 101 . 

3. Recommended course. 



CONSTRUCTION 

CEE 216 1 , 220, 263 2 , 264, 280, 315 1 , 316 1 , 318 1 , 365, 398 (SA) 
T A M 224/CEE 210 (or MATSE 306 or M E 231) 



1. At least two of these courses must be taken. 

2. Not recommended if GE 241 is chosen as an elective. 



CONTROL SYSTEMS 

C S 225 1 
ECE 386, 390 
ECE/G E 370/C S 343 
GE389 
MFG E 330 
MATH 280' 
MATH 361/STAT 351 
MATH 366/STAT 356 
M E 216 1 , 312, 313, 388 
STAT 311/MATH 364 



1. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 

ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION 

ACCY 200, 201, 202 

B ADM 210, 314, 315, 321, 323, 351, 382, 384 

B&T W 253, 261 

ECON 300, 301 

FIN 254 

GEOG/B ADM 205 

I E 235, 262 

I E/G E 334 

MFG E 210, 320, 350 

POL S/B ADM/SOC S 300/ACCY 322 

PSYCH/AVI 258/1 E 240 

PSYCH/AVI 356/1 E 346 



MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING 1 

M E 231 (or T A M 224/CEE 210 or MATSE 306) 
MFG E 2 210, 320, 330, 340, 350 

Other courses must be chosen from the approved lists for computer- 
aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM), operations research, 
and control systems. 



1. Students fulfilling the College of Engineering option in manufacturing engineering 
will automatically complete the requirements of this secondary field. 

2. At least two of these MFG E courses must be chosen. 



NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING AND EVALUATION 

C S 225 1 , 273 1 , 346 

C S/ECE 348 

ECE 374 

ECE/G E 370/C S 343 

ECE/T A M 373 

G E 354 1 , 389 

I E/G E 334 3 

ME 285 

M E 345/C S E 351 

T A M 224VCEE 210 3 (or MATSE 306 or M E 231) 

T A M 312, 326 



1. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 

2. Required course. 

3. Recommended course. 

OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

G E 393 (RSC) 

I E 261, 262, 350 

I E/G E 334 

MATH 361/STAT 351 

MATH 366/STAT 356 

ME 285 

MFG E 320, 350 

STAT 311/MATH 364 



QUALITY CONTROL 

B ADM 314, 315 

I E 235, 262, 336 

I E/G E 334 

MATH 361/STAT 351 

MATH 366/STAT 356 

ME 285 

STAT 311/MATH 364 



REHABILITATION ENGINEERING 

BIOL 120 1 , 121 1 , 122 1 

CSB 234, 322 

CHEM 231 

ECE/BIOEN 314, 315 

PHYSL 103 

REHAB 301, 302, 340, 344 



1. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 

ROBOTICS 

C S 225 1 , 273 1 , 346, 347 
C S/ECE 348 
C S/MATH 375 
ECE 291, 386, 390 
ECE/G E 370/C S 343 
ECE/BIOEN 375 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



100 



G E389 
I E/G E 334 
MFG E 330 

M E 285, 31 3, 342 

1. Recommended only if it is a prerequisite to another listed course. 



THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS 

MATH 280 

M E 345/CSE 351 

T A M 312, 321, 324, 326, 335, 360 

T A M/A A E 327, 328 

T A M 224/CEE 210 (or MATSE 306 or M E 231) 



Customized Secondary Fields 



The following list contains examples of customized secondary fields 

that can or have been petitioned. The most up-to-date list is available 

at http://www. ge.uiuc.edu. 

Accountancy 

Acoustics 

Agricultural Engineering (or other engineering discipline) 

Agronomy 

Animal Science 

Applied Mathematics 

Applied Statistics 

Astronomy 

Audio Engineering 

Aviation 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Cinematography 

Circuit Analysis and Design 

Economics 

Energy 

Finance 

Finite Element Analysis 

Fluid Dynamics 

Food Science 

Geography 

Heat Transfer 

History of Engineering, Science, and Technology 

Human Factors 

Industrial Design 

Industrial Psychology and Organizational Behavior 

Insurance and Actuarial Science 

Integrated Engineering and Industrial Design 

International Business 

Japanese (or any other language) 

Landscape Architecture 

Machine Design 

Meteorology 

Mining and Geological Engineering 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Power Systems 

Pre-Dentistry 

Pre-Law 

Pre-Medicine 

Pre- Veterinary Science 

Railroad Engineering 

Solar Energy 

Technical Journalism 

Telecommunications 

Thermal Science 

Thermodynamics 

Vehicle Dynamics 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 

154 Mechanical Engineering Building 

1206 West Green Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-0366 

Fax: (217) 244-6534 

URL: http://www.mie.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

Industrial engineering reflects the global, systems-oriented way we 
look at the world today. Industrial engineers focus on systems and 
how their components fit together. To solve complex systems prob- 
lems, engineers must understand people as well as technology. Con- 



sequently, industrial engineering draws upon a variety of disciplines, 
from mathematics to psychology, from communications to computer 
science, from production management to process control. Industrial 
engineers design efficient, productive systems in a wide range of 
business, industrial, and governmental settings. 

The technical portion of the industrial engineering curriculum is 
designed as a sequence of increasingly specialized experiences. The 
entering student's first year is spent mastering the basics of science: 
math, chemistry, and physics. Building on this base, in the second year 
students begin to take fundamental engineering courses such as 
statics, dynamics, statistics, and strength of materials. By the third 
year students are taking specialized industrial engineering courses in 
operations research, human factors, facilities and production plan- 
ning, quality control, materials, and manufacturing. Finally, during 
the senior year, students have the opportunity to both broaden and 
deepen their knowledge of the field through technical elective courses. 
At the end of the curriculum, students take the "capstone" senior 
design course (I E 280), in which all the knowledge and skills they have 
learned are applied to projects submitted to the department by indus- 
trial firms. 

The industrial engineering curriculum emphasizes engineering 
design, simulation, hands-on laboratories, computer skills, and writ- 
ten and oral communication. Industrial engineering students can 
expect these elements to be woven throughout their major course 
work, beginning with the introductory freshman course and conclud- 
ing with the senior design course. The technical aspects of an indus- 
trial engineering student's education are complemented by the hu- 
manities and social sciences courses and by material on leadership, 
ethics, and team-building that are distributed throughout the curricu- 
lum. 

To qualify for registration in the industrial engineering courses 
shown in the third (junior) year of the curriculum, a student must have 
completed the mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, 
and engineering courses that are shown in the first (freshman) and 
second (sophomore) years of the curriculum with a combined grade 
point average of at least 2.25 (A=4.0). To remain in good academic 
standing or graduate from this curriculum, a student must have a 
grade point average of at least 2.0 in all 200- and 300-level required 
engineering courses and technical elective courses taken on this 
campus. 

The curriculum requires 132 hours for graduation. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101*— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105*— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

(1) I E 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar 1 

5 MATH 120*— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 102*— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

1 CHEM 106*— General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 
Physical Version) 

3 G E 103* — Engineering Graphics and Design 

3 MATH 130*— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

4 PHYCS 111*— General Physics (Mechanics) 
3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

17 Total 

Second yeor 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 C S 101* — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Engineering and Physical Science 

3 MATH 242*— Calculus of Several Variables 

4 PHYCS 112*— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 T A M 150*— Introduction to Statics 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 
15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 I E 230*— Analysis of Data 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 
2 PHYCS 113*— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

2 PHYCS 114*— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



101 



TAM 212* — Analytical Mechanics, II-Dynamics 
T A M 221* — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 
Free elective 
Total 



Third year 



HOURS 

4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
18 

HOURS 

3 
1 

3 
3 
3 

3 
16 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

I E 210 — Introduction to Operations Research 

I E 240 — Human Factors in Human-Machine Systems 

M E 231 — Engineering Materials 

MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 

I E 235— Industrial Quality Control 

I E 261 — Facilities Planning and Design 

I E 262 — Production Planning and Control 

I E 291— Seminar 

M E 285 — Design for Manufacturability 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 IE 337 — Economic Foundations of Quality Systems 

3 Human factors elective 3 

3 Manufacturing elective 4 

3 Operations research elective 5 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 IE 280 — Senior Industrial Design Project 

3 M E & I E elective 6 

4 Technical elective 7 
4 Free electives 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

17 Total 

* 2.25 GPA rule course 

1. This course is highly recommended for freshmen. It may be used to meet free 
elective requirements. 

2. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements, including 
ECON 102 or 103, of the College of Engineering and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

3. Human factors elective — three hours required. Choose from a departmentally 
approved list. 

4. Manufacturing elective — three hours required. Choose from a departmentally 
approved list. 

5. Operations research elective — three hours required. Choose from a departmentally 
approved list. 

6. M E & I E elective — three hours required. Choose from a departmentally approved 
list. 

7. Technical elective — four hours required. Choose from a departmentally approved 
list. 

CURRICULUM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING* 

Department of Materials Science and Engineering 

201 Metallurgy and Mining Building 

1304 West Green Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-1441 

Fax: (217) 333-2736 

URL: http://www.mse.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and 
Engineering 

With the increasing demand for improvement in overall system 
performance from all industrial sectors, there is a need to develop and 
produce new materials. The materials science and engineering cur- 
riculum provides the student with an understanding of the underly- 
ing principles of synthesis and processing of materials and of the 
interrelationships between structure, properties, and processing. The 
program covers all classes of materials, although in the senior year the 
student may elect to specialize in a particular class of materials. 
Options in ceramics, metals, polymers, and electronic materials are 



offered in the department, but other interdisciplinary options (com- 
posites, biomaterials, and other areas) are possible through a suitable 
choice of electives. 

The program prepares students for professional careers in a wide 
variety of industries as well as for advanced study in this field. Design 
of materials with properties tailored for specific applications and the 
processes used to produce them are first introduced in the freshman 
year. This theme is developed throughout the curriculum in required 
and elective courses and culminates in the capstone design experience 
in the senior year. 

The program in materials science and engineering requires a 
minimum of 128 hours for graduation. 



*At the time of publication, this program was being revised. Please consult an adviser 
for the most current information. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

3 G E 103 — Engineering Graphics and Design 

5 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 1 

(1) MATSE 100— Materials Lecture 2 

4 RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 102— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

1 CHEM 106 — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 
Physical Version) 

3 MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

2 MATH 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 

4 PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 3 
16 Total 

Second year 



HOURS 

3 

3 
4 
2 
6 
18 

HOURS 

3 
3 
3 

2 
2 
3 
16 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Engineering and Physical Science 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112 — General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

TAM 150— Introduction to Statics 

Electives in social sciences or humanities 3 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

MATSE 200 — Introduction to Engineering Materials 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 

PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

PHYCS 114 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

TAM 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 

Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 I E 230— Analysis of Data 

3 MATSE 207 — Materials Science and Engineering Lab, I 4 

4 MATSE 301/CHEM 245— Thermodynamics of Materials 
4 MATSE 305 — Microstructure Characterization 

3 MATSE 303— Synthesis of Materials 

17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 MATSE 204 — Electronic Properties of Materials 

3 MATSE 208— Materials Science and Engineering, Lab II 4 

3 MATSE 302— Kinetic Processes in Materials 

3 MATSE 306— Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Materials 

3 Division specialty course 5 

15 Total 



Fourth year 6 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 Technical elective 7 

6 Division specialty courses 

2 Free elective 

6 Electives in social sciences or humanities 3 

16 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



102 



HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


6 
3 

2 


Division specialty courses 5 
Technical elective* 
Free elective 


3 
14 


Elective in social sciences or humanities- 
Total 



1. It is recommended that freshmen with appropriate background in analytical 
geometry take the MATH 135/245 calculus sequence, delaying MATH 225 until the 
sophomore year, instead of MATH 120/130/242. 

2. This course is highly recommended for freshmen, who may use it to help meet free 
elective requirements. 

3. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering and the campus general education requirements for social 
sciences and humanities. 

4. Satisfies the general education Composition II requirement. 

5. To be selected from the list of division specialty courses as established by the 
department to provide an acceptable level of study in the student's chosen area of 
specialization. One of these selections in the senior year must be from the following 
capstone design courses: MATSE 322, 343, 353, and 362. 

6. It is recommended that students who intend to continue in graduate school 
undertake a research project in the senior year. 

7. Selected from the departmental list of approved technical electives, which is 
available from the department. 

8. Selected outside the area of concentration from departmental list of approved 
technical electives. 

DIVISION SPECIALTY COURSES 

The courses listed below have been approved by the department to 
satisfy the requirements in each of the four areas of technical special- 
ization. Students wishing to pursue other areas of specialization not 
listed should consult with their academic adviser or the chief adviser 
for the department. Each area of specialization requires at least one 
course covering each of the topics processing, design, and character- 
ization together with suitable electives. Such customized programs 
require the approval of the department. 

HOURS CERAMICS CONCENTRATION 

3 MATSE 320 — Ceramics Materials and Properties 

4 MATSE 321 — Ceramic Processing and Microstructure 
Development 

3 MATSE 322— Process Design 

2 MATSE 323 — Ceramic Engineering Processing Laboratory 

3 Division technical elective 1 

HOURS ELECTRONIC MATERIALS CONCENTRATION 

3 MATSE 360 — Electronic Materials and Processing, I 

3 MATSE 361 — Electronic Materials and Processing, II 

3 MATSE 362 — Electronic Materials Laboratory 

3 ECE 340— Solid State Electronic Devices 

3 Division technical elective 1 

HOURS METALS CONCENTRATION 

3 MATSE 340 — Advanced Mechanical Properties of Solids 

3 MATSE 341— Metals Processing 

3 MATSE 342— Metals Laboratory 

3 MATSE 343 — Design of Engineering Alloys 

3 Division technical elective 1 

HOURS POLYMER CONCENTRATION 

3 MATSE 350 — Introduction to Polymer Science and 

Engineering 
3 MATSE 352 — Polymer Characterization Laboratory 

3 MATSE 353— Plastics Engineering 

6 Division technical elective 1 



I . Selected from an approved list of electives for each area of technical specialization. 
This list is available from the department. 

CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING* 

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 

154 Mechanical Engineering Building 

1206 West Green Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217)333-0366 

Fax: (217) 244-6534 

URL: http://www.mie.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Mechanical engineering may be the most diverse of the engineering 
fields, embracing many subfields and affecting all aspects of our lives. 
Mechanical engineers work on new machines, products, and pro- 
cesses that hold the promise of better lives for all of us. They are 



concerned with both technological and economic aspects in the de- 
sign, development, and use of their products. Today one of the 
challenges is to design efficient, low-cost machines and processes that 
use the fewest possible natural resources to improve the lives of 
people throughout the world. 

The technical portion of the mechanical engineering curriculum is 
designed as a sequence of increasingly specialized experiences. The 
entering student's first year is spent mastering the basics of science: 
math, chemistry, and physics. Building on this base, in the second year 
students begin to take fundamental engineering courses such as 
statics, dynamics, basic circuits and electronics, thermodynamics, and 
strength of materials. By the third year students are taking specialized 
mechanical engineering courses in the subfields of fluid mechanics, 
heat transfer, dynamic systems and controls, materials, mechanical 
design, and manufacturing. Finally, during the senior year, students 
have the opportunity to both broaden and deepen their knowledge of 
the field through technical elective courses. At the end of the curricu- 
lum, students take the "capstone" senior design course (M E 280), in 
which all the knowledge and skills they have learned are applied to 
projects submitted to the department by industrial firms. 

The mechanical engineering curriculum emphasizes engineering 
design, hands-on laboratories, computer skills, and written and oral 
communication. Mechanical engineering students can expect these 
elements to be woven throughout their major course work, beginning 
with the introductory freshman course and concluding with the 
capstone design course. The technical aspects of a mechanical engi- 
neering student's education are complemented by the humanities and 
social sciences courses and by material on leadership, ethics, and 
team-building that are distributed throughout the curriculum. 

To qualify for registration in the mechanical engineering courses 
shown in the third (junior) year of the curriculum, a student must have 
completed the mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, 
and engineering courses that are shown in the first (freshman) and 
second (sophomore) years of the curriculum with a combined grade 
point average of at least 2.25 (A=4.0). To remain in good academic 
standing or to graduate from this curriculum, a student must have a 
grade point average of at least 2.0 in all 200- and 300-level required 
engineering courses and technical elective courses taken on this 
campus. 

The curriculum requires 132 hours for graduation. 



"At the time of publication, this program was being revised. Please consult an adviser 
for the most current information. 

First year 



HOURS 

3 

1 



5 

(1) 

4 

3 

16 

HOURS 

3 



3 
3 
4 
3 
17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CHEM 101*— General Chemistry 

CHEM 105*— General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Engineering Lecture 

MATH 120*— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

M E 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar 1 

RHET 105 — Principles of Composition 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CHEM 102*— General Chemistry (Biological or Physical 

Version) 

CHEM 106* — General Chemistry Laboratory (Biological or 

Physical Version) 

G E 103* — Engineering Graphics and Design 

MATH 130*— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111*— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 C S 101* — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Engineering and Physical Science 

3 MATH 242*— Calculus of Several Variables 

4 PHYCS 112*— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 T A M 150* — Introduction to Statics 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 
15 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 ECE 205* — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

1 ECE 206* — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



103 



3 
3 

2 
3 
3 
18 



M E 205* — Thermodynamics 

MATH 285*— Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 

PHYCS 113*— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

T A M 212* — Analytical Mechanics, II-Dynamics 

T A M 221*— Introduction to Solid Mechanics 

Total 



Third year 



HOURS 

3 

4 

3.5 

2 

3 

15.5 

HOURS 

3 
3.5 

3 
3 

3 
15.5 



FIRST SEMESTER 

M E 211 — Introductory Gas Dynamics 

M E 231 — Engineering Materials 

M E 240 — Modeling and Analysis of Dynamic Systems 

PHYCS 1148 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

MATH 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

M E 213— Heat Transfer 

M E 261 — Introduction to Instrumentation, Measurement, and 

Control Fundamentals 3 

M E 271 — Mechanical Design, I 

M E 285 — Design for Manufacturability 

M E 291— Seminar 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

Total 



Fourth year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 ME 250 — Thermal Science Laboratory 

3 ME 272— Mechanical Design, II 
3 M E & I E elective 3 

3 Statistics electives 4 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

3 Free elective 

17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 ME 280 — Senior Mechanical Engineering Design Project 

3 M E & I E elective 3 

6 Technical electives 5 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

3 Free elective 

18 Total 

* 2.25 GPA rule course 

1 . This course is highly recommended for freshmen. It may be used to help meet free 
elective requirements. 

2. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering, including ECON 102 or 103, and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

3. M E & I E electives — 8 hours required. Choose from a departmentally approved list. 

4. Statistics electives— MATH 361 /STAT 351 or MATH 363/STAT 310 must be taken 
as a technical elective or I E 230 must be taken as an M E & I E or technical elective. 

5. Technical electives — 9 hours required. Choose from a departmentally approved 
list. 

CURRICULUM IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

The degree of bachelor of science in metallurgical engineering is no 
longer offered. Students interested in the field of metallurgical engi- 
neering should consider the metals option in the degree for materials 
science and engineering. Additional information may be obtained 
from the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. 

CURRICULUM IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Department of Nuclear Engineering 
214 Nuclear Engineering Laboratory 
103 South Goodwin Avenue 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2295 
Fax: (217) 333-2906 
E-mail: nuclear@uiuc.edu 
URL: http://www.ne.uiuc.edu 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering 

The curriculum in nuclear engineering provides comprehensive study 
in basic sciences, basic engineering, the social sciences and humani- 
ties, and technical areas specific to nuclear engineering. Engineering 
principles, includ ing synthesis and system integration and design, are 
incorporated with the nuclear engineering courses, beginning with an 



orientation to the discipline taken immediately by freshmen and 
continuing through the program to the formal two-course sequence of 
NUC E 348 — Nuclear Power Reactor Engineering and Design and 
NUC E 358 — Design in Nuclear Engineering, the capstone design 
project, in the senior year. Sufficient flexibility of course selection of 
both technical and free electives enables the student to emphasize 
breadth or depth of study or both. Thus, the curriculum prepares its 
graduates not only to enter directly into a wide variety of careers in 
nuclear engineering but also to continue formal education at the 
graduate level. 

Nuclear engineering is a branch of engineering primarily related 
to the development and use of nuclear energy sources. It includes the 
continued application of fission reactors as central electric power 
plant thermal sources; the longer term development of fusion reactors 
for electric power generation; and the expanding use of radiation 
sources in such areas as materials, biological systems, medical treat- 
ment, radiation instrumentation, environmental systems, and activa- 
tion analysis. 

The curriculum during the first two years provides a strong 
foundation in basic sciences (physics and mathematics) and engineer- 
ing sciences (analytical mechanics and thermodynamics), an intro- 
duction to digital computer use, and an introduction to nuclear 
systems. Taking these courses during this time in the program pro- 
vides the student added flexibility in choosing technical elective 
courses with specific prerequisites. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 CHEM 101— General Chemistry 

1 CHEM 105 — General Chemistry Laboratory 

ENG 100 — Introduction to Engineering 

5 MATH 135— Calculus or MATH 120— Calculus and 

Analytical Geometry I 1 

1 NUC E 100 — Orientation to Nuclear Engineering 

4 RHET 105— Principles of Composition or RHET 108— Forms 
of Composition 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 C S 101 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Engineering and Physical Science 

5-3 MATH 245— Calculus, II or MATH 130— Calculus and 

Analytical Geometry, II 1 

4 PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 
0-3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

3 Free elective 3 ' 4 

15-16 Total 

Second yeor 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 
Functions or MATH 242 — Calculus of Several Variables 1 

4 PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

2 T A M 150— Introduction to Statics 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

3-4 Elective in nuclear engineering or technical elective 56 ' 7 

15-16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 ME 205 — Thermodynamics 

2 PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 

2 PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

3 MATH 280— Advanced Calculus or MATH 285— Differential 
Equations and Orthogonal Functions 

3 NUC E 247 — Introduction to Modeling Nuclear Energy 

Systems 

A A E 204 — Introduction to Aerospace Dynamic Systems 
Total 



2 
15 

Third year 



HOURS 

3 



3 
4 
3 

2-3 
16-17 



FIRST SEMESTER 

ECE 205 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

ECE 206 — Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits 

Laboratory 

PHYCS/NUC E 346— Modern Physics for Nuclear Engineers 

T A M 235 — Introduction to Fluid Mechanics 

Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 or MATH 180 — 

Advanced Calculus 1 

Elective in nuclear engineering or technical elective 5,6 ' 7 

Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



104 



HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 NUC E 321 — Introduction to Controlled Thermonuclear 
Fusion 

3 NUC E 351 — Nuclear Engineering Laboratory 

4 NUC E 355 — Reactor Statics and Dynamics 

3 T A M 221 — Introduction to Solid Mechanics 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

17 Total 



Fourth year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 NUC E 331 — Materials in Nuclear Engineering 

2-3 NUC E 332 — Nuclear Engineering Materials Laboratory 8 or 

NUC E 344 — Nuclear Analytical Methods Laboratory 8 or 
technical elective 6 

4 NUC E 348 — Nuclear Power Reactor Engineering and Design 
1 NUC E 352 — Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

2-3 Elective in nuclear engineering or technical elective 5 - 6 - 7 

15-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 NUC E 341 — Principles of Radiation Protection 
4 NUC E 358 — Design in Nuclear Engineering 

2-3 NUC E 323— Plasma Laboratory 8 or NUC E 353— Nuclear 

Reactor Laboratory and Operations 8 or technical elective 6,7 

3 Elective in social sciences or humanities 2 

3 Free elective 3 

16-17 Total 



1. A student with appropriate background in analytic geometry is encouraged to take 
the MATH 135/245 sequence; a student with no previous instruction in analytic 
geometry should take the MATH 120/130/242 sequence. Each student is required to 
take MATH 285 and MATH 280. 

2. Each student must satisfy the social sciences and humanities requirements of the 
College of Engineering, including ECON 102 or 103, and the campus general education 
requirements for social sciences and humanities. 

3. A total of 6 hours of electives are free to be selected by the students. 

4. Consideration should be given to NUC E 101 — Introduction to Energy Sources, as 
a free elective in the freshman or sophomore year. 

5. A student is required to take a minimum of 5 semester hours of nuclear engineering 
technical elective courses. 

6. A student is required to take a minimum of 6 semester hours of technical elective 
courses, as specified by the department from the college technical courses list. 

7. No more than 3 hours of NUC E 200-level courses may be used for NUC E elective 
credit. 

8. A student is required to complete a minimum of one of the advanced 2-semester- 
hour laboratory courses: NUC E 323— Plasma Laboratory, NUC E 332— Nuclear 
Engineering Materials Laboratory, NUC E 344 — Nuclear Analytical Methods 
Laboratory, or NUC E 353 — Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Operations. 



College of Fine and Applied Arts 



117 Architecture Building 
608 East Lorado Taft Drive 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-1660 

The College of Fine and Applied Arts prepares men and women for 
professional work by offering programs in architecture, art and de- 
sign, dance, landscape architecture, music, theatre, and urban and 
regional planning. Both freshmen and transfer students are admitted 
to these curricula. In each curriculum certain basic courses, profes- 
sional courses, and general education requirements, including 6 se- 
mester hours each in the humanities and the arts, social and behavioral 
sciences, and natural sciences and technology, must be completed in 
order to qualify for the specific baccalaureate degree offered. 

For development beyond the undergraduate programs in these 
areas of study, the departments of the college offer graduate curricula 
leading to advanced professional degrees through the Graduate Col- 
lege. 

For students enrolled in other colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the College of Fine and Applied 
Arts offers introductory courses designed to increase aesthetic appre- 
ciation and development, and to portray the role of the arts in 
civilization. Participation in the many bands, choruses, and orchestras 
on campus, as well as private instruction on most instruments and in 
voice, is available to students in all colleges by audition. 

To serve the total academic community and all citizens in the state 



of Illinois, the college features the arts in exhibitions, concerts, lec- 
tures, performances, demonstrations, and conferences within the 
areas of architecture, art, dance, landscape architecture, music, the- 
atre, and urban and regional planning. Many outstanding profession- 
als and works in these fields are brought to the University campus. 
In addition to the teaching divisions, the College of Fine and 
Applied Arts includes the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, 
and the Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion. 

Special Facilities 

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM AND KINKEAD PAVILION 

The museum exhibits art objects from its extensive collections, which 
date from ancient Egypt to our own time. In addition, it schedules a 
full program of changing exhibitions. These bring to the campus a 
wide variety of historic and contemporary works of art. 

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 

The Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, which opened in 1969, 
is a remarkable four-theatre performing arts complex with spaces for 
instruction, rehearsal, and performance in theatre, opera, dance, and 
music. The Foellinger Great Hall, seating 2,200, is designed for large- 
scale musical events. The Festival Theatre, with 1,000 seats, is for 
opera, dance, and other musical stage productions. The Colwell 
Playhouse seats 700 and is the home of the Department of Theatre. The 
Studio Theatre, seating 150, is for experimental productions. An 
outdoor amphitheater, rehearsal rooms, offices, dressing rooms, tech- 
nical shops, and underground parking on two levels for 650 cars 
complete this monumental facility. The major donors of the center 
were Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Krannert of Indianapolis. 

UNIVERSITY MUSIC PERFORMANCE ORGANIZATIONS 

The School of Music offers credit for all students enrolled in its many 
performance organizations. These organizations include ensembles 
in the nationally recognized Band Division: a Wind Symphony, two 
Symphonic Bands, three Concert Bands, Basketball Band, Brass Band, 
Clarinet Choir, the Steel Drum Band, and the world-famous Marching 
Illini. The Choral Division offers singers the opportunity to perform in 
the Oratorio Society, Black Chorus, Women's Chorus, University 
Chorus, Men's and Women's Glee Clubs, Concert Choir, and UI 
Chorale. The University Symphony and Illini Symphony, four jazz 
bands, a Javanese gamelan and other ethnomusicology performance 
ensembles, and ensembles specializing in contemporary music, cham- 
ber music, harp, and early music, among others, satisfy student 
interest both as performers and concertgoers. 

A student in any college wishing to enroll in a performance 
organization should contact the Office of Undergraduate Studies, 
Room 3030 Music Building (phone: 217-244-2670) or the appropriate 
ensemble director to receive further information and arrange for an 
audition. 

LIBRARIES 

Students in the college have at their disposal outstanding library 
resources. In addition to the University Library, one of this country's 
great university collections, there are specialized libraries serving the 
needs of specific fields. The Ricker Library of Architecture and Art 
contains more than 49,000 books (with almost 50,000 in the same fields 
in the University Library), 33,000 photographs, and 9,400 clippings. 

The City Planning and Landscape Architecture Library houses 
about 20,000 volumes of current interest, while more than 100,000 
related volumes are in the University Library. 

The Music Library, located in the Music Building, contains more 
than 765,000 items. These include introductory, instructive, research, 
and reference materials including books, editions of music, record- 
ings, manuscripts, microfilm, and other nonbook materials. 

Departments, Schools, and Curricula 

The College of Fine and Applied Arts consists of the Departments of 
Dance, Landscape Architecture, Theatre, and Urban and Regional 
Planning; the Schools of Architecture / Building Research Council, Art 
and Design, and Music; the Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead 
Pavilion; and the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. The 
specific functions of each department or school and the undergradu- 
ate curricula are described on the following pages. The FAA Student 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 
105 



Handbook provides reference to academic policies and procedures for 
students and faculty in the college. 

All departments in the College of Fine and Applied Arts reserve 
the right to retain, exhibit, and reproduce the works submitted by 
students for credit in any course. 

Special Programs 

INDIVIDUAL STUDY PROGRAM 

Each curriculum offered by the College of Fine and Applied Arts is 
designed to develop professional competence in the specific area of 
studies noted on the degree. Therefore, an individual study program 
must ensure this professional development. A qualified student (3.0 
cumulative GPA) who has specific professional goals that are not met 
by the curricular offerings of the college may request an individual 
program of studies selected from courses offered by the University. 
Such a program must include the basic courses prerequisite for 
advanced study, requirements of the University for graduation, gen- 
eral education requirements of the college, and professional course 
work that will ensure the competence expected for the particular 
degree. 

To obtain approval for an individual study program, the student 
must submit his or her proposal in writing during the sophomore or 
junior year. The proposal should contain an outline of the complete 
program of course work, as well as an explanation of the professional 
goal desired. It should be discussed with and submitted to an ap- 
proved representative of the appropriate department or school con- 
cerned with the degree, who will then forward the proposal through 
the executive officer of the department or school for recommendation 
to the college Office Of Student Affairs. Final consideration and 
notification of the action taken on the proposal will be made by the 
college office. 

STUDY ABROAD 

The college provides the opportunity for students to obtain campus 
credit for foreign study and /or travel for a period of from one 
semester to one calendar year. Students must submit detailed propos- 
als of plans for such study and / or travel for approval by the appropri- 
ate departmental committees and by the associate dean of the college 
prior to such study abroad. If approved, students register and retain 
their status as University students and may continue their student 
health insurance as if they continued to study at the Urbana-Cham- 
paign campus. Information is available from the Study Abroad Office, 
115 International Studies Building. 

HONORS AT GRADUATION 

At graduation, the College of Fine and Applied Arts grants honors to 
superior students. To be eligible, students must have completed a 
minimum of four semesters of work and 65 hours of credit in residence 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

For the degree with honors, the student must have a grade point 
average of 3.25 (A = 4.0) or better in all courses used for graduation and 
be in the upper 25 percent of those receiving a degree from that 
department or school; for the degree with high honors, a grade point 
average of 3.5 or better and the upper 15 percent; and for the degree 
with highest honors, a grade point average of 3.75 or better and the 
upper 6 percent. Credit earned at other institutions and transferred to 
the University of Illinois is used in computing the student's average. 
Credit earned at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must 
be of at least the level required for the degree with honors. 

Requirements 

GRADUATION 

Students who meet the general University requirements with refer- 
ence to registration, residence, scholarship, fees, rhetoric, and general 
education requirements, and who maintain satisfactory records, re- 
ceive degrees appropriate to the curricula completed. Refer to the 
specific departmental and curricular requirements listed on the fol- 
lowing pages. In addition, students must complete the required senior 
courses in their major field of study in residence at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

The Campus Senate, the faculty General Education Board, and the 
colleges and departments are working to implement enhanced gen- 
eral education requirements. Some changes in requirements are ex- 
pected to take effect in the coming years. Thus, new students should 
confirm their general education requirements by consulting college 
and departmental offices, handbooks, or advisers. 

ELECTIVES 

Electives other than professional or supporting electives specified in 
any curriculum in the College of Fine and Applied Arts must be 
chosen from the list that follows . Only foreign language courses taken 
at or beyond the level established by placement exam will be counted . 
Approval for any course not contained in the list must be requested by 
written petition to the college Office of Student Affairs and supported 
by an adviser prior to registration in the course. 

ELECTIVE AREAS 

Air Force aerospace studies, military science, and naval science — advanced 

courses only (maximum of six hours) 

Accountancy 

Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences 

Advertising 

Anthropology 

Architectural history 

Art — all courses specified for nonmajors (none usable for art majors) and all 

art history courses. 

African studies 

Asian studies 

Astronomy 

Aviation — maximum of six hours 

Band — maximum of three hours (not for music majors) 

Business administration 

Chemistry 

Classics 

Communication 

Comparative literature 

Computer science 

Consumer sciences 

Dance— especially DANCE 100, 101, 102, 105, 106, 107, 108, 131, 150, 220, 312, 

331, 341; maximum of three hours, none for majors 

East Asian languages and culture 

Ecology, ethology, and evolution 

Economics 

Engineering 

English — including advanced rhetoric, and business and technical writing 

Finance 

Food science and human nutrition 

French 1 

Geography 

Geology 

Germanic languages and literatures 1 

History 

Horticulture 

Human development and family studies 

Humanities 

Journalism 

Kinesiology (physical education) — maximum of three hours of activity courses 

Labor and industrial relations 

Landscape architecture (not for landscape architecture majors) 

Latin American studies 

L A S — 110, by petition only 

Leisure studies 

Library science 

Life sciences 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 1 

Music — especially MUSIC 100-104, 133, 130-131; maximum of three ensembles, 

two instrumental courses (not for music majors) 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political science 

Psychology 

Religious studies 

Slavic languages and literatures 

Sociology 

Spanish 1 , Italian, and Portuguese 

Speech communications 

Theatre — especially THEAT 170, 178 (not for theatre majors) 

Urban planning (not for majors) 



1 . Cannot duplicate high school entrance or curricular requirements or prerequisites 
regardless of course placement by examination. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



106 



GENERAL EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION 

To comply with the general education sequence requirements, each 
student in the College of Fine and Applied Arts must have a minimum 
of six semester hours in each of the following areas: the humanities 
and the arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and 
technology, cultural studies (three hours Western, three hours non- 
Western, or six hours comparative Western/non- Western), and Com- 
position I and Composition II. Three hours of quantitative reasoning 
is also required. Lists of courses which fulfill these requirements are 
available from departmental and college advising staff or on the Web 
at http:/ /www. uiuc.edu/providers/provost/gened. html. 

1. A student may not use courses in his or her major area to satisfy a 
distribution requirement. 

2. Basic foreign language courses, rhetoric and speech requirements, 
L A S 1 10, and courses numbered 199 may not be used to fulfill the 
distribution requirements. 

3. Foreign language that is used in lieu of high-school entrance 
requirements or is below placement test level will not be accepted 
as elective credit. 

4. A maximum of 6 hours of credit in RHET 100-105, and 108 may be 

applied toward the degree. E S L 114 and 115 will apply toward the 
degree. 

5. Approval to use any course not contained in the campus approved 
lists must be requested by written petition to the Office of the 
Associate Dean of the college prior to registration in the substitute 
course or courses. Approval of an adviser or instructor only is not 
acceptable. 

School of Architecture 

117 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall 
611 East Lorado Taft Drive 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-1330 

The mission of the School is to pursue architecture as a humanistic and 
professional discipline, which synthesizes art and science through 
intellectual rigor, aesthetic judgment, and technical understanding. 
The School achieves its mission through teaching, scholarship, cre- 
ative work, research, and service, and commits itself to the highest 
ideals of the profession and culture of architecture. 

The School's mission is based upon the conviction that architecture 
is first, reflective of the diverse, changing goals, values, and resources 
of society; and second, that architects have various and vital roles in 
interpreting and determining the status, values, conditions, and direc- 
tion of society, its culture and quality of life. 

Architectural education at Illinois is based upon the premise that 
to be an architect in today's complex and fast-changing, global society 
the architect must have knowledge in a variety of areas beyond the 
profession. Recognizing the diversity of roles that are now emerging 
in the profession, graduates should also have a well-developed focus 
in which they can initiate their career. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS IN ARCHITECTURE 

The School of Architecture offers a four-year preprofessional curricu- 
lum leading to the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies degree. 
The BSAS degree provides an undergraduate academic education in 
architecture that can serve as a foundation for advanced professional 
education. The undergraduate curriculum offers an appropriate bal- 
ance of basic professional studies in architectural design, architectural 
history, practice and technology, structures, and studies in the arts 
and sciences. 

The following statement is from the National Architectural Ac- 
crediting Board (NAAB): 

Most states require that an individual intending to become a 
architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are 
accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: DThe Bach- 
elor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study, and 
2) the Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years 
of study following an unrelated bachelor's degree or two years following 
a related pre-professional bachelor's degree. These professional degrees 
are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure 
as architects. 

The four-year pre-professional degree, where offered, is not ac- 
credited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful to those wishing 
a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either contin- 



ued education in a professional program or for employment options in 

fields related to architecture. 
The accredited degree at the University of Illinois is the Master of 
Architecture. 

Since 1967, the School of Architecture has operated a one-year 
study abroad program in Versailles, France, which is open to qualified 
students on a priority basis. Course offerings parallel those available 
to students on the Urbana-Champaign campus but stress the Euro- 
pean context. 

The School of Architecture occupies drafting rooms, lecture rooms, 
and offices in the Architecture Building, Flagg Hall, and Temple 
Hoyne Buell Hall. The Ricker Library of Architecture and Art is 
located in the Architecture Building. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies 

In this curriculum, normal progress is imperative. A student failing to 
complete any required course more than one semester later than the 
time designated in the curriculum is prohibited from progressive 
registration in architectural courses until the deficiency is corrected. 
To continue at the sophomore level and beyond, a student must have 
a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 (A = 4.0) for all University 
course work attempted. For the Bachelor of Science in Architectural 
Studies degree, a total of 127 semester hours are required. 

First year 



HOURS 

2 
3 
3 

5 
3 
4 
3 

3 

6 
32 



REQUIREMENTS 

ARCH 199 IT A— Introduction to Architecture 1 

HIST 111— History of Western Civilization to 1660 

HIST 112— History of Western Civilization, 1660 to the 

Present 

MATH 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

General education 2 : Composition I 3 

ARTGP 187— Freehand Drawing 

C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Architecture 

General education 2 

Total 



Second year 



HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

3 ARCH 171— Architectural Design, I 

3 ARCH 172— Architectural Design, II 

3 ARCH 210 — Introduction to the History of Architecture 

4 ARCH 231— Anatomy of Buildings 

4 ARCH 232— Construction of Buildings 

3 ARTGP 189— Art Studio" 

9 General Education 2 

6 Electives 4 

32 Total 



Third year 



HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

4 ARCH 251— Statics and Dynamics 

4 ARCH 252 — Strengths of Materials and Design Applications 

3 ARCH 271— Architectural Design, III 

3 ARCH 272— Architectural Design, IV 

6 Architectural history 5 

3 UP 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions (or approved urban 

studies substitute) 6 
3 General Education 2 

6 Elective 4 

32 Total 



Fourth year 



HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

4 ARCH 241— Environmental Technology, I 

4 ARCH 242 — Environmental Technology, II 

4 ARCH 351— Theory and Design of Steel and Timber 

Structures 
4 ARCH 352 — Theory of Reinforced Concrete 

6 ARCH 371— Architectural Design, V 

6 ARCH 372 — Architectural Design and Construction 

Documentation 
3 Architectural history 5 

31 Total 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

107 



1. ARCH 199 ITA is not required for students transferring into the BSAS program. 
These students would replace the two credit hours with a general elective course. 

2. General education course requirements are available elsewhere in this catalog. The 
quantitative reasoning requirement is satisfied by the required C S 105 course. The 
required sequence in History of Western Civilization (HIST 111 and HIST 112) also 
satisfies the humanities and the arts requirement. The Composition II requirement 
may be fulfilled by either a separate, approved Composition II course or by a 
Composition II course which also satisfies one of the general education distribution list 
requirements. If by the latter, electives would be taken to make up the credit 
deficiency. 

3. The Composition I requirement may be fulfilled by any of the following courses or 
course sequences (placement is determined by examination): E S L 114 and E S L 115; 
RHET 100, RHET 101, and RHET 102; RHET 103 and RHET 104; RHET 105; RHET 108; 
or SPCOM 111 and SPCOM 112. 

4. For information about electives, see Fine and Applied Arts Student Handbook, page 34. 
A maximum of nine hours may be taken as professional electives. 

5. Architectural history: All students in the undergraduate program in architecture 
must fulfill the architectural history requirement: three courses in addition to ARCH 
210. Students should take one course from each of the following groups: 1) ARCH 
310 — Ancient Architecture, ARCH 31 1 — Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture, 
ARCH 312— Medieval Architecture; 2) ARCH 313— Renaissance Architecture, ARCH 
314 — Baroque and Rococo Architecture; 3) ARCH 309 — Great Modern Architects, 
ARCH 315 — Modern European Architecture, ARCH 316 — Modern American 
Architecture, ARCH 317— Twentieth-Century Architects, ARCH 318— History of 
Urban Environment. 

6. The U P 101 requirement can be fulfilled by substituting one of the following 
approved courses: ARCH 318 — History of the Urban Environment, GEOG 204 — 
Cities of the World, GEOG 210 — Contemporary Social and Environmental Problems, 
GEOG 325 — Historical Geography of American Landscapes to 1880, GEOG 326 — 
Historical Geography of American Landscapes Since 1880, GEOG 327 — American 
Vernacular: the Cultural Landscape, GEOG 383 — Urban Geography, SOC 275 — 
Community, SOC 276 — Cities and Suburbs. 

School of Art and Design 

143 Art and Design Building 
408 East Peabody Drive 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-0855 



The School of Art and Design offers bachelor of fine arts degrees in art 
education, crafts, graphic design, the history of art, industrial design, 
painting, photography, and sculpture. The first year of each curricu- 
lum is basic and cultural. Specialization begins in the second year. 

First-year students who wish to concentrate in the history of art 
will be admitted into the history of art curriculum. All other first-year 
students will be admitted to the general curriculum in art and design. 
After completing one year in the general program, a student must 
select one of the more specialized art and design curricula. 

Courses in the history and appreciation of art and certain courses 
in studio work are open to students from other colleges of the Univer- 
sity. 

A field of concentration in art history is also offered in the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Courses in cinematography and printmaking are offered at intro- 
ductory, advanced, and graduate levels. 

The school occupies studios, drafting rooms, classrooms, and 
offices in several different University buildings. 



FOUNDATION PROGRAM FOR ALL ART AND DESIGN 
CURRICULA 

First year 



REQUIREMENTS 



PORTFOLIO AND MINIMUM GRADE REQUIREMENTS 

A portfolio review may be required for placement in any art and 
design course beyond the entry level of the foundation program. After 
completing the foundation program, a student who meets or exceeds 
minimum grade requirements listed below may apply for admission 
to one of the bachelor of fine arts (BFA) degree curricula. Higher than 
minimum grade point averages may be required due to the limits of 
faculty and facilities. Several BFA curricula also select students by 
portfolio review near the end of the foundation year. Minimum grade 
point averages are: 



2.25 



2.5 
3.3 



Foundation Program, Crafts, Graphic Design, History of Art, 
Painting, and Sculpture 

Art Education, Industrial Design, and Photography 
Individual Study Programs (junior standing) 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


4 


ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 





ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 


3 
3 
4 
2 


ARTGP 117— Drawing, I 
ARTGP 119— Design, I 
RHET 105 or 108— Composition 
Elective 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


4 


ARTHI 112— Renaissance and Modern Art 


3 
3 
6 


ARTGP 118— Drawing, II 
ARTGP 120— Design, II 
Electives 


16 


Total 



This first-year requirement is included in all art and design curricula 
that follow. 



NOTE: Students of all undergraduate programs should be advised that revisions are 
being planned and that they should consult their adviser regarding the status of these 
revisions before registering. 

CURRICULUM IN ART EDUCATION 



FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN ART 
EDUCATION 

The curriculum in art education requires 130 credit hours and pre- 
pares students for positions as teachers of art in the public schools, 
grades kindergarten through twelve. The program places emphasis 
on methods, materials, processes, and practice teaching in Illinois 
schools. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see 
the Council on Teacher Education section elsewhere in this catalog. 



HOURS 



9-10 

3 

3-4 

3 

3 

3 



3 
3 
3 

3 
4 
2 
42-44 

HOURS 

4 
4 
3 
11 

HOURS 


6 
6 
4 
4 
21-23 



41-43 



GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All courses must appear on the Council on Teacher 

Education-approved list. 

SPCOM 111 and 112 and Composition II, or RHET 105 or 108 

and SPCOM 101 and Composition II 

English or American literature 

American history 

POL S 150 — American Government: Organization and Powers 

Non-Western culture 

One additional course to be chosen from literature and arts, 

historical and philosophical perspectives, or social 

perspectives (ARTHI 112 will satisfy this requirement) 

Biological science 1 

Physical science 1 

One additional course to be chosen from biological science or 

physical science 1 

Mathematics 

PSYCH 100— Introduction to Psychology 

Health and physical development 

Total 

ART HISTORY 

ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modem Art 

Advanced art history (200 or 300 level) 

Total 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Orientation to art 

ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 
ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 
ARTPA 125 and 126— Life Drawing, I and II 
ARTPA 143 and 144— Painting Composition I and II 
Art electives. 2 The following are recommended: 
3 ARTPA 141— Beginning Painting 

ARTPA 335— Computer Imaging 

ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 

ARTPA 201— Watercolor, I 

ARTPH 115— Photography 

ARTSC 151— Sculpture 



2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



108 



HOURS 

4 

4 

3 

3 
14 

HOURS 
3 

3 

6 

HOURS 

4 

10 

14 



ART EDUCATION' 

ARTED 204 — Art Education Laboratory (repeat) 

ARTED 206 — Practicum in Teaching Art 

ARTED 207 — Art Curriculum and Practicum in the 

Elementary Grades 

ARTED 208 — Organization of Public School Art Programs 

Total 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

EDPSY 211 — Psychology of Teaching and Learning 

Total 

STUDENT TEACHING 

ARTED 280 — Professional Seminar in Art Education 

ED PR 238 and 242 — Practicum in Elementary and Secondary 

Education 

Total 



1. One science course must include a lab. 

2. A minimum of eight semester hours is required in one of the following areas of 
specialization: sculpture, painting, ceramics, glass, jewelry and metalworking, 
photography, printmaking, art history. 

3. Art education courses are applicable to professional education requirements for 
teacher certification. 

MINOR IN ART EDUCATION (FOR STUDENTS ALREADY 
PURSUING AN EDUCATION DEGREE) 

Required courses in drawing and design must precede all other course 
work in the minor area. For teacher education curricula students only. 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

3 ART&D 107— Elementary Drawing 

3 ARTGP 119— Design, I 

6 Total 

6 Select from the following courses: 

3 ARTPA 201— Introduction to Watercolor Painting 
3 ARTPA 141— Introduction to Oil Painting 

2 ARTSC 151 — Beginning Sculpture 

3 ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

3 ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 
6 Total 

ART EDUCATION 

ARTED 204— Art Education Laboratory 

ARTED 206— Practicum in Teaching Art 

ARTED 207 — Art Curriculum Development and Practicum in 

the Elementary Schools 

Total 

HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART 

ART&D 140— Introduction to Art (required) 
Choose one of the following: 

3 ARTHI 115— Art Appreciation 

3 ARTHI 116 — Masterpieces of Art 

Total 



HOURS 

2 
4 
3 



HOURS 

3 
3 



6-9 



CURRICULUM IN CRAFTS 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN CRAFTS 

The curriculum in crafts requires 122 credit hours and emphasizes 
professional training for the development of the self-sustaining crafts- 
man, the teacher of crafts, and the designer-craftsman in industry. The 
curriculum provides a choice of three areas of concentration: ceramics, 
glassworking, and metalworking. The emphasis within these areas of 
concentration is on the development of individual design capabilities 
and perceptions and upon the mastery of comprehensive technical 
skills. In conjunction with these individual areas of emphasis, each 
student is given experience in other craft media. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105 or 108 — English composition 

3 Composition II 

15 One approved sequence of six hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 

technology, and social and behavioral sciences. ARTHI 112 

satisfies half of the humanities requirement. 

Quantitative reasoning 

Non-Western culture 

Western culture 

Total 



3 
3 
3 
31 

HOURS 

4 
4 
6 
14 



ART HISTORY 

ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 

Advanced art history 

Total 



HOURS GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 

6 ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

6 ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

12 Total 

MAJOR IN CERAMICS 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

6 ARTSC 151 and 152— Sculpture, I and II 

4 ARTPA 125 and 126— Life Drawing (or ARTPA 143— Painting 

Composition I) 
3 ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

3 ARTCR 288— Glass, I 

25 Major sequence in ceramics. Select from: 

ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 

ARTCR 171— Ceramics, II 

ARTCR 270— Ceramics, III 

ARTCR 271— Ceramics, IV 

ARTCR 274— Ceramics, V 

ARTCR 275— Ceramics, VI 

ARTCR 374— Ceramics 

3 ARTSC 219 — Seminar: Sculpture, Glass, and Ceramics 
44 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

6 General electives (see college list) 

18 Professional and technical electives 

24 Total 

MAJOR IN GLASS 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

6 ARTSC 151 and 152— Sculpture, I and II 

4 ARTPA 125 and 126— Painting, I and II 
3 ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

3 ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 

25 Major sequence in glass. Select from: 

ARTCR 288 and 289— Glass, I and II 

ARTCR 384— repeat for 19 hours 
3 ARTSC 219 — Seminar in Sculpture, Glass, and Ceramics 

44 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

6 General electives (see college list) 

18 Professional and technical electives 

24 Total 

MAJOR IN METALS 

HOURS REQUIRED COURSES 

3 ARTGP 121— Drawing Theory 

2 ARTGP 125— Life Drawing 

6 ARTSC 151 and 152— Sculpture, I and II; or ARTID 133 and 

134 — Industrial Design Studio, I and II 

3 ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 
3 ARTCR 288— Glass, I 

3 Select one: 

ARTCR 171— Ceramics, II 

ARTCR 289— Glass, II 

ARTCR 291— Individual Crafts Problems 
Major sequence in metals 
3 ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

3 ARTCR 161— Jewelry, II 

3 ARTCR 260— Jewelry, HI 

3 ARTCR 261— Jewelry, IV 

4 ARTCR 262— Metal Technology (repeat twice) 

5 ARTCR 264— Jewelry, V 
5 ARTCR 265— Jewelry, VI 
3 ARTCR 266— Enameling 

3 ARTCR 263— Metalsmithing 
52 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

4 General electives (see college list) 
9 Art and design electives 

13 Total 

CURRICULUM IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 



FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN GRAPHIC 
DESIGN 

The curriculum in graphic design requires 122 credit hours and 
prepares the student for entrance into the professional practice of 
visual communications. Studio work encompasses typography, im- 
age making, production techniques, and the process of communica- 
tion planning. 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



109 



HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105 or 108— English composition 

3 Composition II 

15 One approved sequence of six hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 
technology, and social and behavioral sciences. ARTHI 112 
satisfies half of the humanities requirement. 

3 Quantitative reasoning 

6 Western and non-Western culture 

31 Total 

HOURS ART HISTORY 

4 ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

4 ARTHI 112— Renaissance and Modern Art 

6 Advanced art history 

14 Total 

HOURS GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 

6 ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

6 ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

12 Total 

HOURS GRAPHIC DESIGN 

3 ARTGD 300— Design History Survey 

3 ARTGD 120— Visual Organization 

3 ARTGD 130— Production 

3 ARTGD 140— Typography 

3 ARTGD 210— Digital Imaging 

3 ARTGD 220— Image Making 

3 ARTGD 230— Advanced Typography 

3 ARTGD 240— Methodology 

3 ARTGD 360— Sequential Design 

4 ARTGD 370— Advanced Graphic Design, I 
4 ARTGD 380— Advanced Graphic Design, II 
35 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

12 General electives (see college list) 

18 Art and design and other professional electives 

30 Total minimum electives required 

CURRICULUM IN THE HISTORY OF ART 

FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN THE HISTORY 
OF ART 

The curriculum in the history of art requires 122 credit hours and 
offers a broad cultural education that unites academic and studio 
training. The curriculum provides sound preparation for the graduate 
study required for museum work or teaching at the college level. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105 or 108 — English composition 

3 Composition II 

21 One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 
technology, social and behavioral sciences, and Western and 
non-Western culture. ARTHI satisfies half of the humanities 
requirement. 

25-43 Electives (see college list of approved electives) 

(One foreign language through the 104 level or equivalent is 
required. French or German is strongly recommended.) 

6 Supportive electives. In addition to the general education 

requirements, a minimum of six hours can be chosen with the 
consent of the adviser in one of the following areas: ancient 
and modern literature, anthropology, classics, history, 
philosophy. Some may satisfy general education 
requirements. 

3 Quantitative reasoning 
62-80 Total 

HOURS SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS IN ART 

4 ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

4 ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 

ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 

6 ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

6 ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

10-16 Art electives 

30-36 Total 

HOURS ADVANCED ART HISTORY 

18-36 Advanced art history 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN INDUSTRIAL 
DESIGN 

The curriculum in industrial design requires 130 credit hours and 
provides education in three-dimensional design for production, to 
meet the needs of people and their environment. Emphasis is placed 
on the awareness of the market demand for design, cognizance of 
methods and materials of production and their relative costs, creation 
of designs that are in visual harmony with their environment and that 
are satisfying to the consumer, and responsiveness to the changes in 
technology and cultural patterns. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105 or 108— English composition 

3 Composition II 

21 One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following 
areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 
technology, social and behavioral sciences, and Western and 
non-Western culture. ARTHI satisfies half of the humanities 
requirement. 

3 Quantitative reasoning 
31 Total 

HOURS ART HISTORY 

4 ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

4 ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 

3 ARTGD 300 — Design History Survey 

3 Advanced art or architecture history 
14 Total 

HOURS GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 

6 ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

6 ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

4 ARTGP 121 and 122— Design Drawing, I and II 
3 ARTGD 120— Visual Organization 

3 ARTPH 115 — Photography for Industrial Designers 

22 Total 

HOURS INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

6 ARTID 133 and 134 — Industrial Design Studio, I and II 

6 ARTID 135 and 136— Model Making, I and II 

2 ARTID 175— Design Methodology 

4 ARTID 210 and 211— Design Methods, I and II 

3 ARTID 371 — Computer Applications in Design, I 

4 ARTID 271 and 272— Materials and Processes, I and II 

6 ARTID 275 and 276— Industrial Design Studio, III and IV 

8 ARTID 277 and 278— Industrial Design Studio, V and VI 

2 ARTID 280— Professional Practices 

3 ARTID 371 — Computer Applications in Design, I 
44 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

8 Technical electives from approved list below 

9 Art electives 

2 General electives (see college list of approved electives) 

19 Total 

HOURS TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

8 min Select from: 

3 ADV 281 — Introduction to Advertising 

4 ARCH 251— Statics and Dynamics 

4 ARCH 252— Strength of Materials and Design 

Applications 
3 ARCH 323— Social and Behavioral Factors for 

Design 

2 ARTID 372 — Computer Applications in Design, II 

3 B ADM 202 — Principles of Marketing 

3 B ADM 210 — Management and Organizational 

Behavior 
3 B ADM 247 — Introduction to Management 

3 B ADM 320— Marketing Research 

3 B ADM 344 — Buyer Behavior 

3 COMM 220 — Communications and Popular Culture 

2 C S 101 — Introduction to Computing for Application 
to Engineering and Physical Science 

3 C S 103— Introduction to Computing with 
Application to Social and Behavioral Sciences 

3 Mathematics (calculus or analytic geometry) 

3 PHYCS 140— Practical Physics: How Things Work 

3 PHYCS 150— Physics and the Modern World 

4 PHYSL 305 — Principles of Ergonomics 

3 PSYCH 356 — Human Performance and Engineering 

Psychology 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



10 



CURRICULUM IN PAINTING 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN PAINTING 

The curriculum in painting requires 122 credit hours and provides 
extensive training in preparation for professional practice as an artist. 

The first year is devoted primarily to the study of design, compo- 
sition, and the acquisition of both representational and abstract draw- 
ing skills. The second year concentrates on introducing the student to 
beginning painting skills and techniques with further studies in 
drawing and composition. The last two years are devoted to the 
development of individual creative expression in painting and other 
media. 

When followed by a program leading to a degree of Master of Fine 
Arts in Painting, this curriculum is recommended as preparation for 
a career as an artist and as a teacher of painting and drawing and 
related subjects at the college level. 



HOURS 
4 

3 
21 



3 
31 

HOURS 

4 
4 
6 
14 

HOURS 


6 
6 
12 

HOURS 

4 
6 
4 
2 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
43 

HOURS 

7 

15 

22 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

RHET 105 or 108— English Composition 

Composition II 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 

technology, social and behavioral sciences, and Western and 

non-Western culture. ARTHI satisfies half of the humanities 

requirement. 

Quantitative reasoning 

Total 

ART HISTORY 

ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 
ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 
Advanced art history 
Total 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113 — Orientation to Art and Design 
ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 
ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 
Total 

PAINTING 

ARTPA 125 and 126— Life Drawing, I and II 

ARTPA 141 and 142— Beginning Painting, I and II 

ARTPA 143 and 144— Painting Composition I and II 

ARTPA 219— Current Art Issues 

ARTPA 225 and 226— Intermediate Drawing 

ARTPA 231 and 232— Intermediate Composition 

ARTPA 233 and 234 — Advanced Composition 

ARTPA 245 and 246 — Advanced Painting and Drawing 

Printmaking course 

Total 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 

Professional electives 

Total 



CURRICULUM IN PHOTOGRAPHY 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN 
PHOTOGRAPHY 

The curriculum in photography requires 122 credit hours; its purpose 
is to encourage the study of photographic media for personal expres- 
sion, to explore the social implications of pictures, and to develop the 
skills needed for careers in photography. General art requirements 
and electives provide a broad foundation in the visual arts, and 
photography courses provide a strong background in the history, 
theory, and practice of photography as art. 

A graduating senior will be required to complete a portfolio of 
photographs under the supervision of a photography faculty adviser. 
Students must provide certain materials in all photography studio 
classes. These include film, paper, and a fully adjustable 35mm or 120 
roll film camera. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105 or 108 — English composition 

3 Composition II 

21 One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 
technology, social and behavioral sciences, and Western and 
non-Western culture. ARTHI satisfies half of the humanities 
requirement. 



3 
31 

HOURS 

4 
4 
3 
3 
14 

HOURS 


6 
6 
12 

HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
6 
6 
3 
6 
30 

HOURS 

12min 



12-17 

HOURS 

12-17 

6 
18-23 



Quantitative reasoning 
Total 

ART HISTORY 

ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 

ARTHI 357— History of Photography 

Advanced art history 

Total 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113 — Orientation to Art and Design 

ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

Total 

PHOTOGRAPHY 
ARTPH 115— Basic Photography 
ARTPH 215— Photography, II 
ARTPH 216— View Camera and Studio 
ARTPH 315— Photography, III 
ARTPH 316— Advanced Photography 
ARTPH 220— Color Photography 
ARTPH 350— Photography Seminar 
Total 

PHOTOGRAPHY ELECTIVES 

Select from: 

1-4 ARTPH 291— Individual Photography Problems 
ARTPH 330 — Alternative Processes 
ARTPH 331— Digital Photography 
ARTPH 360— Video for Artists, I 
ARTPH 361— Video for Artists, II 
ARTPH 398— Photography Workshop 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
Total 



ELECTIVES 

Professional electives (art and design courses other than 

photography) 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 

Total 



CURRICULUM IN SCULPTURE 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN 
SCULPTURE 

The curriculum in sculpture requires 122 credit hours and provides a 
broad and solid foundation in the fundamental disciplines of draw- 
ing, design, and painting, including both traditional and contempo- 
rary concepts. The learning of the time-honored techniques of sculp- 
ture such as modeling and carving is required, and experimentation 
with welding, metal casting, and plastics is fostered. The student is 
encouraged to experience a wide range of materials, techniques, 
methods, and styles. 



HOURS 

4 
3 
21 



3 
31 

HOURS 

4 
4 
6 
14 

HOURS 


6 
6 
4 
6 



28 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

RHET 105 or 108— English composition 

Composition II 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following 

areas: humanities and the arts, natural sciences and 

technology, social and behavioral sciences, and Western and 

non-Western culture. ARTHI satisfies half of the humanities 

requirement. 

Quantitative reasoning 

Total 

ART HISTORY 

ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTHI 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 

Advanced art history 

Total 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

ARTGP 113— Orientation to Art and Design 

ARTGP 117 and 118— Drawing, I and II 

ARTGP 119 and 120— Design, I and II 

ARTPA 125 and 126— Life Drawing 

Choose two of the following: 

ARTPA 141 and 142— Beginning Painting, I and II 

ARTPA 143— Painting Composition 

Choose two of the following: 

ARTCR 160— Jewelry, I 

ARTCR 170— Ceramics, I 

ARTCR 288— Glass, I 

Total 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



III 



HOURS MAJOR SEQUENCE IN SCULPTURE 

Qualified students are encouraged to arrange special projects 
in conjunction with advisers. 
6 ARTSC 151 and 152— Sculpture 

3 ARTSC 219— Current Issues in Sculpture, Glass, and 
Ceramics 

4 ARTSC 253 and 254— Intermediate Sculpture, I and II 

6 ARTSC 255 and 256— Sculpture Materials and Techniques, I 

and II 
4 ARTSC 257 and 258— Advanced Sculpture, I and II 

6 ARTSC 259 and 260— Advanced Sculpture Materials and 

Techniques, I and II 

3 ARTSC 290 — Senior Honors in Sculpture 
32 Total 

HOURS ELECTIVES 

4 General electives (see college list of approved electives) 
13 Professional and technical electives 

17 Total 

Department of Dance 

907 V2 W. Nevada Street 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-1010 
dance@uiuc.edu 

The Department of Dance, an autonomous unit in the College of Fine 
and Applied Arts, offers a small, personalized program within the 
context of a large university setting. The resident faculty of eight full- 
time members is augmented by part-time faculty and artists-in- 
residence. The teaching staff includes ten graduate teaching assistants 
who teach dance in the general education program. Major enrollment 
numbers approximately 50 BFA candidates and 12 MFA. candidates. 
The department is an accredited institutional member of the National 
Association of Schools of Dance. 

Program focus at the graduate and undergraduate levels is on the 
professional preparation of performers, choreographers, and teachers 
with a breadth of understanding in the discipline. Two degree pro- 
grams are offered: bachelor of fine arts and master of fine arts. The 
choreographic and performance emphasis is in contemporary dance; 
ballet is included as an integral component of training. Classes in 
pointe, jazz, tap, and theatre dance are offered in the major curricu- 
lum. The field of dance science is addressed through courses in 
movement fundamentals /dance kinesiology, and the Alexander Tech- 
nique. 

The performance component of the department is housed in the 
Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, utilizing the exceptional 
performing, production, and teaching resources of this world-class 
facility. Additional studio and classroom facilities and the faculty and 
administrative offices are housed in two adjacent buildings in close 
proximity to the Krannert Center. Four department concerts per year 
are produced in the theatres of the Krannert Center, including two 
concerts of student choreography. Numerous opportunities for per- 
formance exist with the Illinois Dance Theatre, in faculty and student 
concerts, in operas and new music performances at the Krannert 
Center, in university and community musicals, and in regional and 
national college dance festivals. 

CURRICULUM IN DANCE 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance 

The BFA curriculum in dance is an intensive program of study for the 
dedicated student, offering concentration in the areas of technique, 
composition, and performance. The curriculum also includes require- 
ments in production, improvisation, music theory and literature for 
dance, teaching, history, movement sciences, Alexander technique, 
theatre dance, and repertory. Electives may be taken in ballet, modern, 
tap, and jazz; advanced improvisation; Labanotation; video choreog- 
raphy; choreographer-composer workshop; and independent study. 
Program requirements include core daily technique classes con- 
sisting of three modern and two ballet classes per week each semester 
in residence, plus elective technique classes for a minimum of one 
additional credit hour per semester. A minimum of two courses in 
other dance forms (jazz, tap, ballroom, etc.) is required. Technique 
placement is assigned by the faculty, and majors must achieve the 
advanced technical level in modern and the intermediate level in 



ballet for a minimum of two semesters prior to graduation. The 
improvisation/composition sequence consists of a minimum of 11 
hours of studio courses culminating in the performance of a senior 
choreographic project. A minimum of six hours of credit is required in 
performance/repertory courses. The curriculum includes as much as 
31 hours of credit in professional electives, which may be taken in 
professional dance courses and /or related arts and sciences. 

Evaluation of majors is an ongoing process. Continued enrollment 
in the program is contingent upon satisfactory performance. A stu- 
dent is expected to maintain a minimum 2.75 grade point average in 
all professional course work and a 3.0 cumulative average in studio 
classes in order to remain in good standing in the department. 

It is possible for transfer students to complete degree requirements 
in a three-year period contingent upon prior completion of general 
education requirements and the fulfillment of the advanced technique 
requirement for two semesters prior to graduation. 

A total of 130 hours is required for this degree. 



HOURS 

4-6 

6 

6 

6 

3 

6 

31-33 

HOURS 

34 



77 

HOURS 

20-22 



GENERAL EDUCATION 

RHET 105 or equivalent 

Humanities and the arts 1 

Social and behavioral sciences 1 

Natural sciences and technology 1 

Quantitative reasoning 

Cultural Studies, Western and non-Western 

Total 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN DANCE 

TECHNIQUE (minimum number of hours) 

DANCE 160— Modern Technique, I 

DANCE 166— Ballet, I 

DANCE 260— Modern Technique, II 

DANCE 266— Ballet, II 

DANCE 360— Modern Technique, III 

DANCE 366— Ballet, III 
Four credit hours per semester, to include core technique 
classes each semester in residence, consisting of three modern 
and two ballet classes per week (3 hours of credit), plus 
elective technique courses for a minimum of one additional 
credit hour per semester. 

A minimum of two courses (two credit hours) in other dance 
forms (jazz, tap, ballroom, etc.) is also required. 
IMPROVISATION 

DANCE 162— Improvisation, I 

DANCE 163— Improvisation, II 
COMPOSITION 

DANCE 164 — Beginning Composition 

DANCE 264 — Intermediate Composition 

DANCE 365 — Advanced Composition 

DANCE 298— Senior Project 
PRODUCTION 

DANCE 131 and 331 — Production Practicum (one hour per 
laboratory for a total of four hours.) 
MUSIC FOR DANCE 

DANCE 168— Music Theory and Practice for Dance 

DANCE 269— Music Literature for Dance 
DANCE EDUCATION 

DANCE 350— Teaching Workshop 
CURRENT ISSUES AND TOPICS 

DANCE 150— Orientation to Dance 

DANCE 295— Career Seminar 
DANCE HISTORY 

DANCE 340— History of the Dance, I (Composition II) 

DANCE 341— History of the Dance, II (Composition II) 
REPERTORY AND PERFORMANCE 

DANCE 130 and 330— Performance Practicum (1-2 hours 
per dance) 

DANCE 335 — Dance Repertory Workshop (2-4 hours) 
DANCE SCIENCES 

DANCE 345 — Dance Kinesiology and Somatics (4 hours) 
Total 

ELECTIVES 1 

RECOMMENDED: 

Additional courses in ballet and modern technique: DANCE 

160, 166, 260, 266, 360, 366 (up to 16 additional hours may be 

counted toward degree requirements) (1-2 per course). 

DANCE 130— Performance Practicum 3 

DANCE 151— Production for Dance 

DANCE 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar (maximum 
number of hours) 

DANCE 210— Jazz Dance 

DANCE 220— Tap Dance 

DANCE 230— Dance Practicum 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



12 



3 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

1-4 

2 

1-2 

3 
3 



2 

3 

3 

3 

2 

2-3 

3 

4 

2 

4 
4 
4 
4 
3 



DANCE 240 — African-American Dance and American 

Culture 
DANCE 243 — Creative Dance for Children 
DANCE 300— Viewing Dance 

DANCE 301 — The Alexander Technique for Dancers 
DANCE 312— Theatre Dance, I 
DANCE 313— Theatre Dance, II 
DANCE 314 — Musical Theatre Choreography 
DANCE 320— Dance Internship 
DANCE 328 — Choreographer-Composer Workshop 
DANCE 330 and 335 — (performance and repertory 

courses) 3 
DANCE 347— Labanotation, I 
DANCE 348— Labanotation, II 
DANCE 351 — Independent Study and Special Topics 

(maximum number of hours) 
DANCE 367 — Choreography for the Video Camera 
ARTCI 180 — Introduction to Cinematography 
ARTHI 115— Art Appreciation 
MUSIC 133 — Introduction to World Music 
MUSIC 158 — Group Piano for Non-Music Majors 
MUSIC 181— Voice 
THEAT 170 — Fundamentals of Acting 
THEAT 175 — Improvisation in Acting 
THEAT 291 — Costume Design for Dance (under 

Individual Topics) 
THEAT 332— Stage Management 
THEAT 340 — Lighting Design for Dance 
THEAT 355 — History of the American Musical Theatre, I 
THEAT 356 — History of the American Musical Theatre, II 
THEAT 372 — Introduction to Theatre Management 



1. See college-approved general education distribution lists. 

2. A minimum of eight hours must be in the area of professional electi ves. It is strongly 
recommended that dance majors consider professional electives outside the dance 
area itself. 

3. A maximum of 16 hours may be accumulated toward degree requirements in 
Dance 130, 330, and 335. 



Department of Landscape Architecture 

101 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall 
611 East Lorado Taft Drive 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-0176 
Fax: (217) 244-4568 

The Department of Landscape Architecture offers a four-year under- 
graduate curriculum, leading to the professional degree of Bachelor of 
Landscape Architecture. The degree is accredited by the American 
Society of Landscape Architects. 

The curriculum is a balanced program of technical, design, and 
general education courses that equips the student with the necessary 
skills for entry-level professional practice in private offices or public 
agencies. Program requirements include design studio courses and 
classes in plants and planting design, engineering, site construction, 
communication techniques, computer-aided design, history, and 
theory. The curriculum includes a minimum of 15 hours of credit in 
supporting electives that are taken in related art and science courses. 
A total of 128 semester hours of credit are required for graduation. 

A student must have and maintain a minimum 2.5 cumulative 
University of Illinois grade point average to continue beyond the 
sophomore-level year. Transfer applicants must have completed 30 or 
more semester hours of undergraduate course work with an earned 
GPA of at least 2.5 (A = 4.0) including prerequisite credits in Compo- 
sition I, physical geography, plant biology, and trigonometry. 

The department's administrative office, upper-level studios, fac- 
ulty offices, and classrooms are located in Temple Hoyne Buell Hall. 
The sophomore studio and departmental library are located in 
Mumford Hall. 

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 
First year 



6 General education electives 1 

4 GEOG 103— Earth's Physical Systems 2 

4 RHET 105 or 108— Composition I 

16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 LA 170 — Introduction to Behavorial Factors in Design 

3 PLBIO 102— Plants, Environment, and Man 2 

2-5 MATH 114 or 116— Trigonometry 

6 General education electives 

14-17 Total 

Second year 



HOURS 

5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 

HOURS 

5 
3 
3 
3 
3 
17 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

L A 133 — Basic Landscape Design 

L A 150 — Introduction to Environmental Factors in Design 

L A 180 — Design Communications, I 

U P 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions 

Supporting elective 3 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

L A 134— Site Design 

L A 142 — Landform Design and Construction 

L A 181 — Design Communications, II (Composition II) 

Quantitative reasoning (see approved list) 

Supporting elective 3 

Total 



HOURS 

5 
4 
3 
3 
15 

HOURS 

5 
4 
3 
3 
15 

Fourth year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

L A 235 — Recreation and Community Design 

L A 243 — Site Engineering 

NRES 253 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamentals, I 

L A 214 — History of Landscape Architecture 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

L A 236 — Design Workshops, I 

L A 244 — Landscape Construction 

NRES 254 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamentals, II 

Supporting elective 3 

Total 



HOURS 

2 



FIRST SEMESTER 

L A 101 — Introduction to Landscape Architecture 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

5 LA 337 — Regional Landscape Design 

3 LA 252— Planting Design, I 

2 LA 246 — Professional Practice 

3 Supporting elective 3 

4 Elective 
17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 LA 253— Planting Design, II 

5 LA 338 — Design Workshops, II 
3 Supporting elective 3 

3-6 Elective 

14-17 Total 



1 . A minimum of six credit hours of approved general education electives is required 
in each of the areas of humanities and the arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural 
sciences and technology, and Western and non- Western cultural studies for a minimum 
of 18 credit hours (see college-approved general education distribution list). 

2. PLBIO 102 and GEOG 103 fulfill the natural sciences and technology general 
education requirement for this curriculum. 

3. A minimum of 15 credit hours of professionally related courses selected from the 
department's recommended list of supporting electives is required, with a minimum 
of three credit hours in each of the categories of history, communications, techniques, 
and environment. 

School of Music 

2134 Music Building 
1114 West Nevada Street 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2620 

The School of Music occupies the Music Building, Smith Memorial 
Hall, Harding Band Building, Music Annex, and space in the Krannert 
Center for the Performing Arts. These facilities include studios, class- 
rooms, and practice and rehearsal rooms; experimental electronic 
music, computer music, digital piano, and computer-assisted music 
instruction laboratories; and musical instruments, audio equipment, 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



113 



and several auditoriums used for concert, recital, opera, and musical 
theatre performances. 

The Music Library is one of the largest collections of music items 
in America. The faculty and students of the school present nearly 700 
concerts, recitals, and stage performances throughout the year, both 
on and off campus. In addition, visiting artists and scholars from 
throughout the world present master classes and lectures which 
complement the concert and academic offerings provided on the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. 

The School offers two professional undergraduate degrees: the 
Bachelor of Music and the Bachelor of Music Education. Undergradu- 
ate students whose musical interests are in the broad historical, 
cultural, and theoretical aspects of music (rather than professional 
training) may want to investigate the bachelor of arts degree offered 
through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, described elsewhere 
in this catalog. Graduate degrees are offered in a variety of fields of 
study in music at the master's and doctoral levels. 

Bands, choral ensembles, orchestras, jazz bands, new music en- 
sembles, world music ensembles, opera theatre, and many other 
musical organizations are open to music and non-music majors and 
members of the university and civic communities by audition. Private 
lessons and courses in history, theory, and music appreciation are 
open to all qualified students in the University. 

All applicants for admission to the School of Music must apply and 
be admitted to the University of Illinois, must audition successfully on 
their major performance instrument or in voice, and must take the 
Music Fundamentals Proficiency Exam. On-campus auditions are 
preferred, but taped auditions are acceptable under certain circum- 
stances. In addition, applicants for music composition-theory and 
history of music majors must submit original scores or other pertinent 
writings to substantiate their ability to pursue work in these areas. 
Applicants in music education must also complete an interview with 
the music education faculty. 

For complete information concerning audition schedules, special 
admission requirements, and curricula, prospective students should 
contact the coordinator of undergraduate admissions, School of Mu- 
sic, 1114 West Nevada Street, Urbana IL 61801, (217) 244-0551. 

CURRICULA IN MUSIC 



For the Degree of Bachelor of Music 

These curricula require 130 semester hours of credit for graduation. 
Required courses in composition, quantitative reasoning, humanities 
and the arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and 
technology, and cultural studies, and electives must be chosen from 
the college general education distribution lists available from college 
and departmental advisers. 

Public performance is an integral part of the training in applied 
music, and all students, when sufficiently prepared, are required to 
participate in student recitals. 

All students are required to enroll in at least one approved perfor- 
mance ensemble each semester in residence with a maximum of 10 
semester hours of ensemble applicable to their degree. 

All students pursuing majors in this curriculum are required to 
successfully complete at least one course in conducting and must 
demonstrate keyboard competency. 

The sequences of classes given below are based on a typical four- 
year course of study but may be modified with an adviser's approval 
to meet the student's individual needs. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC MAJOR 

Students may major in piano, organ, violin, viola, violoncello, double 
bass, flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, bassoon, trumpet or cornet, 
horn, euphonium, baritone, trombone, tuba, percussion, or harp. 

A student enrolled in this program normally takes two applied 
subjects, one a major (32 semester hours) and the other a minor (8 
semester hours). Third- and fourth-year students must present satis- 
factory public junior and senior recitals as part of the requirements for 
the Bachelor of Music degree. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

4 Major applied music subject 1 

2 Minor applied music subject 

2 MUSIC 101— Music Theory and Practice, I 

2 MUSIC 110 — Introduction to Art Music: International 



Perspectives 

2 MUSIC 111— Aural Skills, I 

1 Music ensemble 

3-4 Composition I or SPCOM 111 

16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

4 Major applied music subject 1 

2 Minor applied music subject 

2 MUSIC 102— Music Theory and Practice, II 

2 MUSIC 112— Aural Skills, II 

1 Music ensemble 

5-6 Composition II, SPCOM 112, or Electives 

16-17 Total 

Second year 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


4 
2 

2 


Major applied music subject 1 
Minor applied music subject 
MUSIC 103— Music Theory and Practice, III 


2 


MUSIC 113— Aural Skills, III 


3 
1 


MUSIC 213— History of Music, I 
Music ensemble 


4 
18 


Foreign language 
Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


4 
2 
2 
1 


Major applied music subject 1 

Minor applied music subject 

MUSIC 104 — Music Theory and Practice, IV 

MUSIC 114— Aural Skills, IV 


3 
1 


MUSIC 214— History of Music, II 
Music ensemble 


4 

17 


Foreign language 
Total 


Third year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


4 
3 
3 
1 


Major applied music subject 1 - 2 
Music theory 3 
Music history 4 
Music ensemble 


5 


Electives 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


4 
3 
3 

1 


Major applied music subject" 
Music theory 3 
Music history 4 
Music ensemble 


5 


Electives 


16 


Total 


Fourth year 



HOURS 

4 
2 

1 
9 
16 

HOURS 

4 

2 



15 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Major applied music subject 1,2 

MUSIC 330— Applied Music Pedagogy, or MUSIC 331- 

Piano Pedagogy, I s 

Music ensemble 

Electives 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Major applied music subject 1,2 

MUSIC 330— Applied Music Pedagogy, or MUSIC 332- 

Piano Pedagogy, II s 

Music ensemble 

Electives 

Total 



1. Concurrent registration in MUSIC 250 is required for all students who register for 
any of MUSIC 183-186 and MUSIC 383-386. 

2. String majors will register for MUSIC 269 (one semester hour) concurrently with 
the major applied subject (three semester hours), for a total of four semester hours each 
semester in the third and fourth years. 

3. The music theory requirement for the third year is to be satisfied by MUSIC 300 and 
308, three semester hours each, or by MUSIC 308, six semester hours, with each 
semester devoted to a specifically listed topic. 

4. To be chosen from MUSIC 310-317, 333-337. 

5. For string and piano majors only. String majors will register for MUSIC 330; piano 
majors will register for MUSIC 331 and 332. Other majors may choose two semester 
hours of electives. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



I 14 



MUSIC COMPOSITION-THEORY MAJOR 

In this major, emphasis mav be placed on music composition or on the 
theory of music. Necessary course adjustments require approval of 
the composition-theory division. 

If the emphasis is on composition, the fourth-year student must 
present a satisfactory senior recital of original compositions. If the 
emphasis is on theory, an advanced project approved by the compo- 
sition-theory division is required in the fourth year. 



Fourth year 



NOTE: Revisions in this major were pending at the time of publication. Students 
should consult with a composition-theory adviser for more information. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 Applied music 1 

2 MUSIC 101— Music Theory and Practice, I 

2 MUSIC 106 — Beginning Composition 

2 MUSIC 110 — Introduction to Art Music: International 

Perspectives 
2 MUSIC 111— Aural Skills, I 

1 Music ensemble 

3-4 Composition I or SPCOM 111 

2 Electives 
16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 Applied music 

2 MUSIC 102— Music Theory and Practice, II 

2 MUSIC 106 — Beginning Composition 

2 MUSIC 112— Aural Skills, II 

1 Music ensemble 

5-6 Composition II, SPCOM 112, or Electives 

14-15 Total 

Second year 



HOURS 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 
4 
18 

HOURS 

2 
2 

1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
4 
17 

Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Applied music 

MUSIC 103— Music Theory and Practice, HI 

MUSIC 113— Aural Skills, HI 

MUSIC 200— Instrumentation 

MUSIC 206 — Intermediate Composition 

MUSIC 213— History of Music, I 

Music ensemble 

French, German, or Italian 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 
Applied music 

MUSIC 104— Music Theory and Practice, IV 
MUSIC 114— Aural Skills, IV 

MUSIC 204 — Compositional Problems: Serial Techniques 
MUSIC 206 — Intermediate Composition 
MUSIC 214— History of Music, II 
Music ensemble 
French, German, or Italian 
Total 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 


Applied music 

MUSIC 300— Counterpoint and Fugue 

MUSIC 306 2 — Composition 

Music theory 2 

Music history 3 

Music ensemble 


3 


Electives 


17 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 
3 
3 


Applied music 

MUSIC 306 2 — Composition 

MUSIC 308 4 — Analysis of Musical Form 


2 
3 

1 


Music theory 2 
Music history' 
Music ensemble 


3 


Electives 


17 


Total 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 Applied music 

3 MUSIC 302— Music Acoustics 
3 MUSIC 306 2 — Composition 

2 Music theory 2 

1 Music ensemble 
6 Electives 

17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 Applied music 

3 MUSIC 306 2 — Composition 

3 MUSIC 315 — Music of the Twentieth Century 

2 Music theory 2 

1 Music ensemble 

3 Electives 
14 Total 



1 . It is strongly recommended that students in this major acquire a thorough practical 
knowledge of the piano as part of the applied music study. 

2. The music theory electives for the third and fourth years are to be chosen from 
MUSIC 301, 303, 304 (may be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours), 305, 308 
(may be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours in addition to MUSIC 308, 
sections D or E), 320 (may be repeated to a maximum of four semester hours; senior 
standing in music required), 321, 322, 328, and 345. If the curricular emphasis is in 
music theory, the following will apply: juniors will substitute an additional three 
semester hours of MUSIC 308 for MUSIC 306; seniors will take MUSIC 229, 301, and 
305, and substitute an additional 300-level music history course for MUSIC 306. 

3. To be chosen from MUSIC 310-314, 316, 317, 333-337. 

4. Must include either Section D (music in the first half of the twentieth century) or 
Section E (music since World War II). 

HISTORY OF MUSIC MAJOR 

This major offers a broad cultural education that unites academic and 
musical training. It also provides preparation for the graduate study 
required for research and teaching in musicology or ethnomusicol- 

°gy- 

The fourth-year student, working with an adviser, must complete 
a satisfactory thesis as part of the requirements for the bachelor of 
music degree. 

First year 



HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 


Applied music 1 


2 


MUSIC 101— Music Theory and Practice, I 


2 


MUSIC 110 — Introduction to Art Music: International 




Perspectives 


2 


MUSIC 111— Aural Skills, I 


1 


Music ensemble 


3-4 


Composition I or SPCOM 111 


4 


Electives 


16-17 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 


Applied music 


2 


MUSIC 102— Music Theory and Practice, II 


2 


MUSIC 112— Aural Skills, II 


1 


Music ensemble 


7-8 


Composition II, SPCOM 112, or Electives 


14-15 


Total 


Second 


year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 


Applied music 


2 


MUSIC 103— Music Theory and Practice, III 


2 


MUSIC 113— Aural Skills, HI 


3 


MUSIC 213— History of Music, I 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


French or German 2 


2 


Electives 


16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 


Applied music 


2 


MUSIC 104 — Music Theory and Practice, IV 


1 


MUSIC 114— Aural Skills, IV 


3 


MUSIC 214— History of Music, II 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


French or German 2 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



115 



Electives 
Total 



Third year 



HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 Applied music 

3 Music history 3 

3 MUSIC 300— Counterpoint and Fugue 

1 Music ensemble 

4 French or German 2 
3 Literature 4 

2 Electives 
18 Total 



HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 
3 
3 
1 


Applied music 

Music history 3 

MUSIC 308— Analysis of Musical Form 

Music ensemble 


4 


French or German 2 


3 


Literature" 


2 


Electives 


18 


Total 


Fourth year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 
3 
3 
2 


Applied music 
Music theory 5 
Music history 3 
MUSIC 229— Thesis 


1 


Music ensemble 


3 
1-2 


History 4 
Electives 


15-16 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 
3 
3 

2 


Applied music 
Music theory 5 
Music history 3 
MUSIC 229— Thesis 


1 


Music ensemble 


3 
1-2 


History 4 
Electives 


15-16 


Total 



1. It is strongly recommended that students in this major acquire a thorough practical 
knowledge of the piano as part of the applied music study. 

2. Two years in one language are required except with special permission of the 
student's adviser. 

3. Third- and fourth-year music history courses are tobechosen from MUSIC 310-319, 
333-337; however, a minimum of two courses must be chosen from MUSIC 310-315. 

4. May not be used to satisfy general education sequence requirements. 

5. To be chosen from MUSIC 306 and 308. 

VOICE MAJOR 

The primary applied subject in this major includes both private 
lessons in voice and classes in vocal diction. 

At least eight semester hours each in the Italian, French, and 
German languages are required for the voice major. A student who 
has not completed at least two years of one of these languages in high 
school should begin study of languages during the first year. 

Third- and fourth-year students must present satisfactory public 
junior and senior recitals as part of the requirements for the Bachelor 
of Music degree. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 MUSIC 101— Music Theory and Practice, I 

2 MUSIC 110 — Introduction to Art Music: International 

Perspectives 

2 MUSIC 111— Aural Skills, I 

1 MUSIC 166— English Diction, or Music 167— Italian Diction 

3 MUSIC 181— Voice 

1 Music ensemble 

2 Piano 

3-4 Composition I or SPCOM 111 

16-17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

2 MUSIC 102— Music Theory and Practice, II 



2 


MUSIC 112— Aural Skills, II 


1 


MUSIC 166— English Diction, or MUSIC 167— Italian Diction 


3 


MUSIC 181— Voice 


1 


Music ensemble 


2 


Piano 


5-6 


Composition II, SPCOM 112, or Electives 


16-17 


Total 


Second 


year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 


MUSIC 103— Music Theory and Practice, III 


2 


MUSIC 113— Aural Skills, III 


1 


MUSIC 168— German Diction, or MUSIC 169— French 




Diction 


3 


MUSIC 181— Voice 


3 


MUSIC 213— History of Music, I 


1 


Music ensemble 


2 


Piano 


4 


Foreign language 


18 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 


MUSIC 104— Music Theory and Practice, IV 


1 


MUSIC 114— Aural Skills, IV 


1 


MUSIC 168— German Diction, or MUSIC 169— French 




Diction 


3 


MUSIC 181— Voice 


3 


MUSIC 214— History of Music, II 


1 


Music ensemble 


2 


Piano 


4 


Foreign language 


18 


Total 


Third year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


3 


Music theory 1 


3 


Music history 2 


1 


MUSIC 366— Vocal Repertoire, I 


3 


MUSIC 381— Voice 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


Foreign language 


2 


Electives 


17 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


3 


Music theory 1 


3 


Music history 2 


1 


MUSIC 367— Vocal Repertoire, II 


3 


MUSIC 381— Voice 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


Foreign language 


1 


Electives 


16 


Total 


Fourth year 


HOURS 


FIRST SEMESTER 


2 


MUSIC 330— Applied Music Pedagogy 


3 


MUSIC 381— Voice 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


Foreign language 


5 


Electives 


15 


Total 


HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


2 


MUSIC 330— Applied Music Pedagogy 


3 


MUSIC 381— Voice 


1 


Music ensemble 


4 


Foreign language 


5 


Electives 


15 


Total 



1 . The music theory requirement for the third year is to be satisfied by MUSIC 300 and 
308, three semester hours each, or by MUSIC 308, six semester hours, with each 
semester devoted to a specifically listed topic. 

2. To be chosen from MUSIC 310-317, 333-337. 

OPEN STUDIES 

Open Studies is available only to undergraduate students who have 
completed at least one semester in residence at the University of 
Illinois as a major in instrumental performance, history of music, 
composition- theory, voice, or music education. It allows concentra- 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



116 



tion in diverse fields such as music of other cultures, jazz, piano 
pedagogy, or other areas and requires a minimum of 130 semester 
hours of credit for graduation. 

Admission to Open Studies is initiated by petition to a committee 
of three faculty, the open studies adviser, and the assistant dean of the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Studies in Music, Music 
Building Room 3030. 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Music Education 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. This 
curriculum prepares its graduates for teaching music in grades kin- 
dergarten through twelve. For teacher education requirements appli- 
cable to all curricula, see the Council on Teacher Education section 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

All students are required to enroll in at least one approved perfor- 
mance ensemble each semester in residence except the semester when 
the}' student teach and must demonstrate keyboard competency. 

HOURS GENERAL EDUCATION* 

9 Composition I, Composition II, and Speech Performance 

3 American or English literature 

3-4 American history 

3 POL S 150 

3 Non-Westem culture 

3 General elective (to be chosen from literature and arts, 

historical and philosophical perspectives, social perspectives, 

or non-Western cultures and traditions) 

9 Biological and physical sciences 

3 Mathematics 

4 PSYCH 100 

2 Health and physical development 

42-43 Total 

*AU courses must appear on the Council on Teacher Education approved list. 

HOURS MUSICIANSHIP 

12 Applied major 

15 Music theory, and aural skills 

8 Music history and literature 

4 Ensemble 

39 Total 



HOURS 
30 



10-18 



46-54 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Courses in area of professional specialization (choral, 
elementary-general, instrumental, or piano pedagogy) 1 
Clinical experience 2 

2 Early field experience 
8-16 Student teaching" 

Education 

3 EPS 201— History and Philosophy of Education 
3 EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

Total 



HOURS PROFESSIONAL AND/OR GENERAL ELECTIVES (as needed) 
2-8 Total 



1. Does not lead to certification. 

2. If public school certification is not desired, the student selects alternative courses 
totaling 13 semester hours in consultation with his or her adviser, seven semester 
hours of which must be from the student's applied major, music theory, or music 
history. 

3. Only eight hours of student teaching apply toward graduation. 

Department of Theatre 

4-122 Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 
500 South Goodwin Avenue 
Urbana, IL 61801 
(217) 333-2371 

The curricular options in the Department of Theatre provide intensive 
and extensive preparation for the rigorous demands of a professional 
career in the theatre. A strong commitment to work in the theatre and 
a realistic understanding of its intellectual, aesthetic, and physical 
demands are therefore necessary in students who enter the department. 
Before acceptance in the undergraduate programs in theatre, 
applicants must participate in one of several preadmission work- 
shops, which take place at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts 
five or more weekends each year, and at selected regional locations 



(normally New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles). In these workshops, 
applicants who ultimately plan to pursue the curriculum in acting in 
their junior year should present a four-minute audition, comprised of 
two contrasting works from dramatic literature. Applicants who 
ultimately wish to pursue a curriculum in design, technology, or 
management should present a portfolio of previous theatre work. 
Applicants who intend to pursue the performance studies curriculum 
should also bring a portfolio of their previous theatre work, and any 
written work that reflects the student's interests and accomplish- 
ments. Information on these workshops will be sent to applicants once 
their admissibility to the University has been determined by the Office 
of Admissions and Records. 

Three curricula are offered in theatre: (1) the Professional Studio in 
Acting, (2) the Performance Studies Curriculum, and (3) the Division 
of Design, Technology and Management, which has specialized op- 
tions in scene design, costume design and construction, theatre tech- 
nology and lighting, and stage management. Students are formally 
admitted to these curricula only after an evaluation by the faculty 
during the students' second year. The programs in acting and theatre 
design, technology, and management are intended for students who, 
in the judgment of the faculty, are ready to concentrate in these 
specialties in an intensive undergraduate professional tiaining cur- 
riculum . The performance studies curriculum is intended for students 
who plan to pursue advanced training and /or careers in theatre 
history, criticism, directing, theatre for youth, and playwriting. 

The Department of Theatre, as one of the resident producing 
organizations of the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, pro- 
duces seven fully mounted productions each academic year and three 
each summer. The theatres and workshops of the Krannert Center 
serve as laboratories for theatre students, who have the opportunity to 
learn and to work alongside an outstanding staff of resident theatre 
professionals and visiting artists, preparing performances in theatre, 
opera, and dance. In addition, the department sponsors a small 
experimental theatre space for student-directed productions. 

All theatre majors must successfully complete five production 
crew assignments at the Krannert Center under THEAT 100 — Practi- 
cum, I. Acting and performance studies students cast in Krannert 
Center productions may receive additional credit for their roles under 
THEAT 300 — Practicum, II. Design, technology, and management 
students also receive credit for additional production duties at the 
Krannert Center under THEAT 300 — Practicum, II. Students seeking 
credit for practical theatre work outside the Krannert Center must 
secure the approval and supervision of theatre faculty in the form of 
an Individual Project (THEAT 291 or THEAT 292) or as a Professional 
Internship (THEAT 390). 

CURRICULA IN THEATRE 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre 

A minimum of 128 hours of credit is required for the degree. 

First year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

2 THEAT 120— Basic Theatre Practice: Scenecraft 

2 THEAT 121 — Basic Theatre Practice: Costume Design and 
Technology 

3 THEAT 170 — Fundamentals of Acting 

3 THEAT 178— The Arts of Theatre 

4 RHET 105 or 108— Composition I 
3 General education 

17 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

3 THEAT 109— Dramatic Analysis 

2 THEAT 122— Basic Theatre Practice: Lighting 

2 THEAT 123— Basic Theatre Practice: Makeup 

3 THEAT 175— Improvisation in Acting, or THEAT 125— 
Graphic Skills 

6 General education 

16 Total 

PROFESSIONAL STUDIO IN ACTING 

The acting program provides intensive training in a wide variety of 
performing media. In the first and second years, students take intro- 
ductory courses in movement, voice, and acting. Near the end of their 
second year of study in the department, students must audition for 
acceptance into the professional studio in acting. In addition to 
successful completion of all classes in their first and second years, 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



117 



acceptance will be based on an evaluation of each student's potential 
for professional-caliber performance, commitment to theatre, and the 
necessary discipline for intensive study. Third- and fourth-year stu- 
dents meet in daily four-hour sessions, each of which includes sections 
in dynamics, voice and speech, movement, and acting. Semester-long 
acting sections include advanced scene study, musical theatre, Shake- 
speare, and acting for the camera. Students in the professional studio 
in acting must audition for department productions and perform as 
cast. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 Composition I 

Composition II (fulfilled by THEAT 110) 
3 Quantitative reasoning 

21 General education 

3 Humanities and the arts. (The other half of this 

requirement is fulfilled by THEAT 110.) 
6 Natural sciences and technology 

6 Social and behavioral sciences 

6 Cultural studies (Western and non-Western 

cultures) 
9 General electives 

11 General and/or professional electives 

48 Total 

HOURS REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

20 Required first-year theatre courses 

5 THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

3 THEAT 110— Literature of the Modern Theatre 

3 THEAT 176 — Relationships in Acting 

3 THEAT 177— Acting: The Author, the Play, and the Role 
2 THEAT 179— Acting: Voice 

2 THEAT 182— Acting: Movement 

8 THEAT 253— Acting Studio, I 

8 THEAT 254— Acting Studio, II 

8 THEAT 255— Acting Studio, III 

8 THEAT 256— Acting Studio, IV 

2 THEAT 300— Practicum, II 

4 THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 
4 THEAT 362— Development of Theatrical Forms, II 
80 Total 

DIVISION OF DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT 

Students planning careers in professional theatre audio design, cos- 
tume design, costume construction, lighting design, scene design, 
stage management, and theatre technology are selected for the options 
in this division by a process of faculty evaluation in their second year 
of study in the department. Criteria for acceptance and continuance in 
these options include satisfactory completion of all course work in the 
first and second years, potential for professional-caliber work, com- 
mitment to theatre, and the necessary discipline for intensive study 
and practice. Students in these options are assigned to teams that 
design, mount, and manage more than twenty productions annually 
in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. 

HOURS GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

4 Composition I 

Composition II (fulfilled by THEAT 110) 

3 Quantitative reasoning 

21 General education 

3 Humanities and the arts. (The other half of this 

requirement is fulfilled by THEAT 110.) 

6 Natural sciences and technology 

6 Social and behavioral sciences 

6 Cultural studies (Western and non-Western 

cultures) 

9 General electives 

8-9 General and/or professional electives 

45-46 Total 

Costume Design and Construction Option 

HOURS REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

20 Required first-year theatre courses 

5 THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

3 THEAT 110— Literature of the Modern Theatre 

3 THEAT 225— Scene Design, I 

6 THEAT 227— Senior Projects in Design, I 
6 THEAT 228— Senior Projects in Design, II 

3 THEAT 231— Introduction to Stage Lighting 

3 THEAT 242— Introduction to Costuming 

3 THEAT 336— History of Decor 

3 THEAT 342— Costume Patterning 

4 THEAT 343— Costume Draping 

4 THEAT 345— Costume History for the Stage, I 



4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
82 



THEAT 346— Costume History for the Stage, II 

THEAT 347— Costume Rendering 

THEAT 348— Costume Fabrication 

THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 

THEAT 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms, II 

Total 



Scene Design Option 

HOURS REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

20 Required first-year theatre courses 

5 THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

3 THEAT 110— Literature of the Modern Theatre 

4 THEAT 223— Stage Mechanics, I 
3 THEAT 225— Scene Design, I 

3 THEAT 231 — Introduction to Stage Lighting 

3 THEAT 233— Stage Drafting 

4 THEAT 325A— Advanced Scene Design, I 
4 THEAT 325B— Advanced Scene Design, I 
4 THEAT 326A— Advanced Scene Design, II 
4 THEAT 326B— Advanced Scene Design, II 

3 THEAT 336— History of Decor 

2 THEAT 337— Scene Painting Techniques 

2 THEAT 338— Rendering Techniques for the Stage 

2 THEAT 339 — Property Management and Design 

4 THEAT 345— Costume History for the Stage, I 
4 THEAT 346— Costume History for the Stage, II 

4 THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 

4 THEAT 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms, II 

82 Total 



Stage Management Option 



HOURS 

20 

5 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

10 

4 

4 

4 

3 



4 
4 
3 
82 



REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

Required first-year theatre courses 

THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

THEAT 110 — Literature of the Modern Theatre 

THEAT 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar: Management 

THEAT 225— Scene Design, I 

THEAT 230— Technical Direction 

THEAT 231— Introduction to Stage Lighting 

THEAT 281 — Directing: Script Preparation 

THEAT 300— Practicum, II 

THEAT 332— Stage Management 

THEAT 345— Costume History for the Stage, I 

THEAT 346— Costume History for the Stage, II 

THEAT 355 — History and Development of American Musical 

Theatre, I 

THEAT 356 — History and Development of American Musical 

Theatre, II 

THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 

THEAT 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms, II 

THEAT 372 — Introduction to Theatre Management 

Total 



Theatre Technology and Lighting Option 

HOURS REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

20 Required first-year theatre courses 

5 THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

3 THEAT 110— Literature of the Modern Theatre 

4 THEAT 223— Stage Mechanics, I 
3 THEAT 225— Scene Design, I 

3 THEAT 230— Technical Direction 

3 THEAT 231— Introduction to Stage Lighting 

3 THEAT 232— Advanced Stage Lighting 

4 THEAT 233— Stage Drafting, I 

3 THEAT 330 — Theatre Sound Technology 

4 THEAT 332— Stage Management 

2 THEAT 337 — Scene Painting Techniques 

4 THEAT 346— Costume History for the Stage, II 

4 THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 

4 THEAT 362— Development of Theatrical Forms, II 

13 All courses from one of the concentrations below: 

TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

4 THEAT 224— Stage Mechanics, II 

4 THEAT 323— Stage Mechanics, III 

3 THEAT 331— Sound Design 

3 THEAT 339 — Property Management and Design 

LIGHTING CONCENTRATION 

3 THEAT 334 — Video Lighting and Production 

3 THEAT 335 — Lighting for the Musical Stage 

4 THEAT 340— Lighting Design for Dance 

3 THEAT 341— Sketching for Lighting Design 

82-83 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



I 18 



HOURS 

4 



3 
21 



PERFORMANCE STUDIES CURRICULUM 

The performance studies curriculum provides professional training 
in areas of theatre and related studies for which further advanced 
training or experience is necessary. The performance studies curricu- 
lum is intended to lay the groundwork for students planning to 
pursue professional careers in such areas as theatre history and 
criticism, directing, playwriting, theatre for youth, and dramaturgy — 
areas in which a specialization at the graduate level is normally 
required. The performance studies curriculum provides both a work- 
ing knowledge of a wide range of performance arts and a proficiency 
in research and writing skills associated with theatrical production 
and scholarship. Primary emphasis is given to students gaining a 
comprehensive knowledge of the drama and performance practices of 
the past and an understanding of current practice. 

After successful completion of the second year of study, students 
are admitted into the performance studies curriculum after a review 
of their work by the performance studies curriculum committee. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

Composition I 

Composition II (fulfilled by THEAT 110) 

Quantitative reasoning 

General education 

3 Humanities and the arts. (The other half of this 

requirement is fulfilled by THEAT 110.) 

6 Natural sciences and technology 

6 Social and behavioral sciences 

6 Cultural studies (Western and non-Western 

cultures) 
General electives 

General or professional electives (12 hours must be chosen 
from a list of approved supporting professional electives.*) 
Total 

REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

Required first-year theatre courses 

THEAT 100— Practicum, I 

THEAT 110— Literature of the Modern Theatre 

THEAT 176— Relationships in Acting, or THEAT 180— Oral 

Interpretation 

THEAT 199— Playwriting 

THEAT 281— Directing: Script Preparation 

THEAT 291— Individual Topics 

THEAT 292— Individual Topics 

THEAT 332— Stage Management 

One course to be chosen from: 
THEAT 225— Scene Design, I 
THEAT 231— Introduction to Stage Lighting 
THEAT 336— History of Decor 
THEAT 346— Costume Design for the Stage, II 

THEAT 361 — Development of Theatrical Forms, I 

THEAT 362— Development of Theatrical Forms, II 

Two courses to be chosen from: 

THEAT 350— Multi-Ethnic Theatre 
THEAT 351— History of Theatre in Western Society, I 
THEAT 352— History of Theatre in Western Society, II 
THEAT 355 — History of the American Musical Theatre, I 
THEAT 356 — History of the American Musical Theatre, II 
THEAT 365— History of the American Theatre 
THEAT 371 — Contemporary Theatrical Forms 

THEAT 372— Theatre Management 

One course to be chosen from: 
THEAT 353— Creative Dramatics 
THEAT 354— Theatre for the Child Audience 
THEAT 375 — Acting: Rehearsal Techniques 
THEAT 376— Oral Interpretation of Fiction 
THEAT 381— Directing: Rehearsal 

Total 



12 
20 

60 

HOURS 

20 

5 
3 
3 

3 
3 
2 
2 
4 
3 



68 



"Supportingprofessional electives are approved by the performance studies curriculum 

committee. An up-to-date list of approved courses is on file in the Department of 

Theatre office. Currently approved supporting professional electives include the 

following courses: 

Theatre: all courses. 

Anthropology: 244 (Anthropology of Play). 

Asian Studies: 185 (Kabuki), 199 (Beijing Opera), 325 (Modern Japanese Drama). 

Classical Civilization: 222 (The Tragic Spirit). 

Dance: 340 (History of Dance, I), 341 (History of Dance, II), 346 (Theory and Philosophy 

of Dance). 

English: 180 (Drama in Production), 243-244 (Development of Modern Drama, I and 

II), 316 (Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries), 318-319 (Shakespeare, I and II), 328 

(English Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century), 343 (Bernard Shaw), 365 

(Comedy), 366 (Topics in Modern Drama). 

German: 332 (German Drama). 

Music: 265 (Opera-Musical Theatre). 



Rhetoric: 199 (Playwriting). 

Russian: 335 (Russian Drama). 

Scandinavian: 361 (Ibsen), 362 (Strindberg). 

Speech Communications: 203 (Dramatics for Teachers). 

Department of Urban and Regional 
Planning 

111 Temple Hoyne Buell Hall 
611 East Lorado Taft Drive 
Champaign, IL 61820 
(217) 333-3890 

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers a program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Urban Planning. Urban 
planning gives practical expression to human values. Its aim is to 
sustain and enhance the quality of life in cities and regions, to create 
the good society. Therefore, in addition to special technical skills, each 
student is helped to acquire a broad liberal education that leads to an 
understanding of the natural and social environments, their prob- 
lems, and their potentialities for enriching human life. Undergraduate 
planning education leads to diverse professional employment careers 
or graduate study in urban planning or related professions and is 
particularly useful as a pre-law program. Continuation in the pro- 
gram requires the student to maintain a 2.5 grade point average. The 
degree is professionally accredited by the Planning Accreditation 
Board. 

A transfer student must have completed 30 or more semester 
hours of acceptable undergraduate college work (including introduc- 
tory courses in microeconomics, statistics, political sciences, and 
sociology; a sequence in English composition is desirable) with an 
earned grade point average of at least 2.5 (A = 4. 0) . Transfer applicants 
not meeting these requirements will be considered in special cases. 

The department's administrative offices, classrooms, and work- 
shop space are located in Temple Hoyne Buell Hall. Students may go 
to Room 111 for information. 

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning also offers a 
program of graduate studies leading to the Master of Urban Planning 
degree, dual degree programs with the Master of Architecture and the 
Juris Doctor degrees, and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Regional 
Planning. 

CURRICULUM IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Urban Planning 

A minimum of 120 hours is required for this degree. 

First and second years 



HOURS 

4 

6 

3 



HOURS 

3 
3 



3 
18 



REQUIRED GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

RHET 105 or equivalent (Composition I) 

Humanities and the arts 

Natural sciences and technology 

Social and behavioral sciences (Cultural Studies, General Ed) 

3 ECON 102 — Microeconomics 

4 SOC 100— Introduction to Sociology 

3 POL S 150 — American Government: Organization 

and Powers 

REQUIRED URBAN PLANNING COURSES 

U P 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions 

U P 108 — Planning Policy and Law (transfer students take 

U P 308 in the senior year) 

U P 116 — Analytical Planning Research Methods 

(Quantitative Reasoning I, General Ed) 

U P 203 — Cities, Regions and Social Science 

U P 205 — Ecological Systems in Planning (Natural Science, 

General Ed) 

UP 260 — Social Inequality and Social Welfare Planning 

General electives 3 



60 First and second year total 

Third year* 



HOURS 



FIRST SEMESTER 
U P 212 — Graphics and Written Communications for Planners 
(Composition II) 
U P 216 — Planning Analysis 
Department elective in Urban Planning 1 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



19 



3 Planning elective 2 

2 General elective' 
16 Total 

HOURS SECOND SEMESTER 

6 UP 247— Planning Workshop, I 

3 Department elective in Urban Planning 1 
3 Planning elective 2 

2 General elective 3 

14 Total 

•Transfer students must fulfill first and second year requirements. 
Fourth year 

HOURS FIRST SEMESTER 

3 UP 308 — Law and Planning Implementation (Transfer 
students) 

6 Planning electives 2 

6 General electives 3 

15 Total 



HOURS 


SECOND SEMESTER 


6 
3 

3 


Urban Planning Workshop" or Independent Study 
Department elective in Urban Planning 1 
General elective 3 


3 
15 


Planning elective 2 
Total 



1. A total of nine hours of electives must be taken in Department of Urban and 
Regional Planning courses. 

2. Planning elective courses totaling 15 hours must be chosen from courses taught in 
other departments (in addition to introductory courses listed under the first two 
years), with approval of departmental adviser. A list is maintained by the department. 

3. General electives as needed to complete the total hours required are to be selected 
from the approved college list. Excess department and planning courses may be 
applied toward this requirement. 

4. Urban planning workshop classes include U P 327, 347, 348, and 378. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES'" 

Students electing the urban studies minor must consult with the head 
of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. 

A minimum of 21 hours of course work in urban and regional 
planning and urban studies (approved planning elective courses) is 
required for the completion of this minor. 



"This minor does not lead to endorsements in an additional teaching field. 



College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 



270 Lincoln Hall 

702 South Wright Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

(217) 333-1705 

http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/ 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) has four missions: 
scholarly inquiry and the generation of knowledge, preparation of 
individuals for an array of careers and professions, service to the 
public, and the provision of the intellectual core of the University. The 
college shares the first three missions with professional schools and 
other colleges on this campus, but the last mission is uniquely the 
responsibility of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. By fulfilling 
this responsibility, the college helps develop broadly educated indi- 
viduals who are committed to or characterized by open inquiry, 
critical thinking, effective communication, and responsiveness to the 
needs of individuals and society. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the largest individual 
college within a university setting in the state of Illinois. The college 
enrolls more than 40 percent of the undergraduates on the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. The college serves the entire campus by provid- 
ing a full range of required general education and service courses in 
basic disciplines. 

Students in the college are expected to understand the content and 
develop skills in areas that reflect the overall purpose of the college: 
fluency and facility in English; literacy in at least one foreign language; 
broad exposure to a number of different disciplines; and intensive 
study in one discipline (or an interdisciplinary program). The student 
has a wide choice of courses to satisfy these requirements; however, 



ultimately he or she must plan a diverse and intensive program of 
study, prepare for an occupational/professional and intellectual fu- 
ture, and develop that clarity and range of mind that is the goal of 
educated people. 

Admission 

The general admission requirements and procedures of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences are outlined in the Admission chapter. These 
requirements were established to enable students admitted here to 
make the most effective use of the facilities of the University. The 
requirements should ensure that entering students have the capability 
of completing a degree program successfully. 

The high school subjects required for admission provide a reason- 
ably rigorous preparation for most students. The college nonetheless 
urges prospective students to build on the minimum requirements 
whenever possible. In the study of foreign language, for example, 
successful completion of four years of a single language in secondary 
school will satisfy the College graduation requirement in foreign 
language so students should include as much foreign language as 
possible in their secondary school program. 

Advising 

Academic advising is a critical resource for students in developing a 
program of study. Especially on a large campus, a continuing, com- 
mitted association with a faculty member can be a valuable and 
rewarding part of the student's educational experience. Advisers are 
available to aid students in choosing majors, planning for career 
choices, and selecting courses for each semester. All students in 
degree programs in the college have academic advisers available in 
their major departments except for interdisciplinary work such as 
international studies which is advised at the college level. In addition, 
the assistant and associate deans in the college assist students in 
handling a variety of problems and questions. 

In order to simplify minor changes in course selections, a student 
who has successfully completed at least 30 semester hours of course 
work and who understands the requirements of the college and the 
University may choose courses without obtaining approval from an 
academic adviser unless informed otherwise by the college. See the 
following Web site for the most current available course offerings: 

http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/las_course_offerings.html 

A student does need to obtain approval from an adviser for a 
number of arrangements, including a formal plan of study for the 
major and the election of the credit-no credit grading option. A 
student may be requested by the college office to obtain approval from 
an adviser and /or the dean for all course changes under certain 
circumstances. It is very important for advanced students to confer 
with advisers on a regular basis; therefore, the college encourages all 
students to consult with their academic advisers at least once each 
semester. 

One particular resource for a student in the college who has not 
decided on a plan of study is the General Curriculum. The General 
Curriculum is an advising center for students who want to investigate 
a variety of subjects before selecting their majors or who have decided 
on programs that require transfer at the sophomore or junior level. The 
General Curriculum is not a degree program and does not serve as a 
formal program of study. Entering freshmen and continuing students 
with less than 45 semester hours of credit may elect to enter the 
General Curriculum and may remain in the program until they 
complete 56 academic semester hours. The office provides individual 
advising; group orientation sessions; and printed materials describ- 
ing majors, curricula, and many career opportunities. Students in the 
General Curriculum are LAS students and must follow LAS policies 
and regulations. The General Curriculum Office serves as the college 
office for students in the program. 

Another special resource in the college is qualified advising for 
students who are interested in law school. An assistant dean in the 
LAS Student Affairs Office (270 Lincoln Hall) counsels students who 
have declared a prelaw interest. All such students are encouraged to 
consult the prelaw adviser. Students preparing for law school may 
elect any major. To obtain a handbook on prelaw advising, contact the 
Prelaw Adviser at 270 Lincoln Hall. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



120 



Graduation Requirements 



DEGREES GRANTED 

A degree can be earned by completing the requirements for either a 
Sciences and Letters Curriculum or one of the Specialized Curricula. 
A student completing the Sciences and Letters Curriculum receives 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts 
and Sciences, depending on the student's major. A student electing 
one of the majors in the physical sciences, life sciences, psychology, 
mathematics, or statistics will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 
A student in any of the other majors will receive the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. 

COMPONENTS OF THE SCIENCES AND LETTERS 
CURRICULUM 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION REQUIREMENT 

The ability to write effectively is a cornerstone of a liberal education. 
All students in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum must satisfy the 
campus rhetoric requirement. Students are strongly encouraged to 
include additional writing courses in their programs whenever pos- 
sible. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

Each student in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum is expected to 
learn a foreign language in the undergraduate program. A minimum 
expectation is that the student obtain a knowledge equivalent to the 
completion of the fourth semester of college study in a language. Some 
programs may require additional study or the study of a specific 
language. A student planning on graduate study may wish to consult 
the department of intended graduate study about language require- 
ments for the graduate program. This may dictate the student's choice 
of language study during undergraduate work. The foreign language 
requirement may be met in any of the following ways: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of four years of the same foreign language 
in high school; 

2. Satisfactory completion of the fourth-semester level of a language in 

college; 

3. Satisfactory completion of the third-semester level in each of two 

languages by any combination of high school and college work; 

4. Satisfactory performance at the fourth-semester level in a language 

proficiency examination approved by the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and the appropriate department. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT 

Through required General Education courses, each student in the 
college is expected to obtain an understanding of the ways in which 
knowledge is acquired and used in the diverse disciplines represented 
by the University's curricula. The graduate must have some acquain- 
tance with literature and the arts, history, philosophical inquiry, and 
the insights and techniques of the social and behavioral sciences, the 
aims and methods of the natural sciences, and quantitative reasoning. 

Students enrolled in the Sciences and Letters Curricula (the 
exceptions are the Teaching Options) are therefore required to 
complete broadly distributed course work from the approved LAS 
General Education course lists. Specific LAS General Education 
requirements and current lists of courses approved for each of the 
general education categories may be obtained in the LAS Student 
Affairs Office, 270 Lincoln Hall or may be viewed at the following 
Web site: http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/undergrad_degree_ 
programs. html#general_education. 

Students enrolled in Sciences and Letters Curricula Teaching 
Options and Teacher Education majors in Computer Science and 
Foreign Languages must complete General Education requirements 
as mandated by the state of Illinois. Students should contact their 
adviser to be sure of degree and certification requirements in their 
particular areas. 

Students enrolled in Specialized Curricula must fulfill the Campus 
General education requirements. 

Students are urged to consult with their advisers regarding the 
choice of General Education courses. Some of the approved courses 
have prerequisites. 

MAJOR/MINOR 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences requires in-depth study in 
one discipline as well as substantial experience in a number of other 
areas. The in-depth study portion of the student's program of study is 



called the major. A minor constitutes a coherent program of study 
requiring some depth in the subject, but not as extensive a program as 
the major. Minors are optional. 

ADVANCED HOURS REQUIREMENT 

Each student is expected to complete a minimum portion of the 
undergraduate program in courses that presume some prior knowl- 
edge of the discipline. A course is considered advanced if it presumes 
such prior knowledge as indicated by the faculty (specially desig- 
nated 200-level courses), by the course number (most courses num- 
bered 300 or above), by the prerequisites necessary for enrollment in 
the course, or by the quality and depth of work expected of students 
in the course. All students in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum are 
expected to complete at least 21 hours of courses designated as 
advanced by the college in order to graduate. All such courses must be 
taken at baccalaureate-granting institutions. At least 12 advanced 
hours in the major must be taken on this campus. Courses designated 
as advanced are those courses numbered 300 or above and those 200- 
level courses that are specially designated as advanced. A list of 200- 
level courses that are designated as advanced may be found in the LAS 
Student Handbook. 

ELECTIVES 

Most liberal arts majors allow time in the student's program for a 
number of courses chosen freely from among the University's offer- 
ings. These courses, called electives, may be used to prepare for 
professional study, to prepare for business and career opportunities, 
or simply to explore additional interests. In addition to all courses 
used in fulfilling the minimum graduation requirements of the college 
(rhetoric, foreign language, general education, and major), a student 
following a major may use as electives: 

— Courses offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; 

— Courses offered by departments and schools in other colleges of the 
University that sponsor majors in LAS [art (excluding applied art 
courses), computer science, economics, finance, music (excluding 
applied music courses), or physics]; 

— A maximum of 24 hours (to be counted toward graduation) of 
courses not included in either of the above, that is, courses offered 
by departments and schools in other colleges on campus. Ex- 
amples of courses in this category are accounting, business admin- 
istration, engineering, applied art courses, and applied music 
courses. 

Undergraduate students of high academic standing (i.e., a 3.0 
grade point average or higher in courses taken beyond the sophomore 
level) within 10 semester hours of earning their bachelor's degrees 
may elect courses in the Graduate College for graduate credit with the 
consent of the dean of that college. Also, students with senior standing 
may petition the Graduate College for permission to elect graduate 
courses for undergraduate credit. Interested students should first 
consult the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 270 Lincoln Hall. 

RESIDENCE 

Students must satisfy the University residence requirement for gradu- 
ation. They must complete on this campus, uninterrupted by work 
elsewhere, either the first three years (at least 90 hours of course work) 
or the last year (at least 30 hours) . The hours must be applicable toward 
the degree sought. In addition, all students must earn 60 hours of 
course work at four-year (baccalaureate-granting) institutions after 
any work at community colleges. 

TOTAL HOURS 

A total of 120 semester hours acceptable toward the degree is required 
for graduation in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum. 

Students should be aware that there are several specific limitations 
on the amount of particular kinds of credit that may be used in the 120 
hours: no repeated courses; no more than 24 elective hours outside the 
college, as discussed above; no more than 4 hours of credit in basic 
kinesiology courses; no more than 11 hours of credit in calculus and 
analytic geometry; no more than 12 hours of credit in basic physics; no 
more than 18 hours of credit in 100-level life science courses toward a 
School of Life Sciences major; no more than 9 hours of credit in basic 
rhetoric courses; no more than 10 hours of first- and second-year 
foreign language proficiency; no more than 24 hours of credit in 
aviation courses (must be from the pilot training curriculum); no more 
than 6 hours (200 and 300 level) of credit in ROTC courses; no more 
than 4 hours of credit in religious foundation courses; no more than 12 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



121 



hours of credit in undergraduate open seminar (199 course); and no 
more than 18 hours of credit in independent study and 199 courses. 
See the LAS Student Handbook for details about the credit limitations in 
each of these areas. 

Students matriculating at some college or university in June 1989 
or later may not use credit in algebra (MATH 112 or equivalent) 
toward a baccalaureate degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. In addition, students in the programs requiring trigonom- 
etry for admission (e.g., the specialized curricula in chemical engi- 
neering, chemistry, and physics) may not use credit in trigonometry 
(MATH 1 14 or equivalent) toward an LAS degree. See the LAS Student 
Handbook for further details. 

Areas of Study 

MAJORS IN THE SCIENCE AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

The major consists of course work designated by the department 
and approved by the faculty of the college. The major should be 
chosen no later than the junior year. Since most majors require that 
the student choose courses in consultation with a faculty adviser, 
students should plan to discuss the major with a faculty adviser 
early in the junior year. In most cases, a student will be expected to 
submit to the LAS Student Affairs Office (270 Lincoln Hall) a Major 
Plan of Study Form (available at Departmental Offices) before the 
end of their fifth semester. 

Students must take all course work for the minimum requirements 
of the major for a traditional letter grade (or on the satisfactory- 
unsatisfactory basis). The credit-no credit grading option may not be 
used for courses in the major. 

The satisfactory completion of a major requires not only the 
completion of a stated amount of course work, but also that the 
student earn at least a 2.0 average in courses for the major. In order to 
graduate, a student should earn at least a 2.0 grade point average in all 
courses that are included in the major average and taken on this 
campus and at least a 2.0 average in all courses that are included in the 
major average and taken here and elsewhere. Consult the department 
or the college office for a list of courses included for a specific major's 
average. 

Bachelor degree programs are offered in the following areas: 

Actuarial Science 
Anthropology 
Art History 
Astronomy 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Option 

Chemistry Teaching Option 
Classics 

Classical Archaeology Option 

Classical Civilization Option 

Classics Option 

Greek Option 

Latin Option 
Comparative Literature 
East Asian Languages and Cultures 
Economics 
English 

English Option 

English Teaching Option 
Finance 
French 

French Studies Option 

French Commercial Studies Option 
Geography 

General Human and 

Physical Geography Option 

Urban and Social Geography Option 

The Physical Environment 

(The Earth's Land and Biota) Option 

Historical and Regional Studies Option 

Natural Resources Evaluation Option 

Economic Geography Option 

Spatial Graphics and Analysis Options 
Geology 

Geology Option 



Earth Science Teaching Option 
Germanic Languages and Literatures 

German and Commercial Studies Option 

Language and Literature Option 

Language Studies Option 

Modern German Studies Option 

Scandinavian Studies Option 
History 

History Option 

Social Studies Teaching Option 
Humanities 

American Civilization Option 

Cinema Studies Option 

Medieval Civilization Option 

Renaissance Studies Option 
Individual Plans of Study 
Italian 

Latin American Studies 
Life Sciences 

Bioengineering 

Biology General 

Biology Honors 

Biology Teaching 

Biophysics 

Cell and Structural Biology 

Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution 

Entomology 

Microbiology 

Molecular and Integrative Physiology 

Plant Biology 
Linguistics 

General Linguistics Option 

Hebrew Language and 

Linguistics Option 
Mathematics 

Mathematics Option 

Graduate Preparatory Option 

Applied Mathematics Option 

Operations Research Option 

Mathematics Teaching Option 
Mathematics and Computer Science 
Music 

Ethnomusicology Option 

Music History Option 

Music Theory /Composition Option 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Physics Option 

Physics Teaching Option 
Political Science 
Portuguese 
Psychology 
Religious Studies 

Asian Religions Option 

Biblical Studies Option 

Christianity Option 

Islam Option 

Judaica Option 

Philosophy of Religion Option 

Religion and Culture Option 
Rhetoric 

Creative Writing Option 

Professional Writing Option 
Russian and East European Studies 
Russian Language and Literature 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech Communication 

Interpretation Option 

Rhetorical and Communication 
Theory Option 

Speech Teaching Option 
Statistics 
Statistics and Computer Science 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



122 



SPECIALIZED CURRICULA 

Specialized curricula are designed for specific educational purposes 
which cannot be accommodated within the majors of the Sciences and 
Letters Curriculum. Specialized curricula are prescriptive programs 
that are offered as preprofessional study, preparation for graduate 
pursuits, or designed to meet the demands of an outside accrediting 
agency. Students in the specialized curricula are not eligible to receive 
minors. 

Each specialized curriculum consists of a more rigidly structured 
course of study than that generally described for the sciences and 
letters majors. 

Biochemistry 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 

Geology and Geophysics 

Geology Option 

Geophysics Option 

Environmental Geology Option 
Physics 

MINORS AND INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

A minor is a coherent program of study (generally 16-21 hours) 
requiring some depth in the subject, but is not as extensive as the 
major. Students must take the specified courses listed for each minor. 
No course substitutions are allowed. Minors are optional but must be 
completed in conjunction with a major in the Sciences and Letters 
Curriculum. Some majors may allow use of a minor in place of other 
supporting course work. 

While the minor does not replace other degree requirements, 
courses may be used both for the minor and to meet other degree 
requirements as appropriate. Students must see their records officer 
during the first semester of their senior year if they want to declare a 
minor. Students are advised to consult with the department offering 
the minor for information on the courses that will fulfill the require- 
ments. 

MINORS 

Anthropology 

Astronomy 

Cinema Studies 

Classical Archaeology 

Classical Civilization 

Comparative Literature 

Computer Science 

East Asian Languages and Cultures 

English 

English as a Second Language 

French 

Geology 

German 

Greek 

History 

Italian 

Latin 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 

Portuguese 

Religious Studies 

Russian and East European Studies 

Russian Language and Literature 

Sociology 

Spanish 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 

There are several interdisciplinary areas in which scholarly needs or 
employment demands require recognition. In these areas, the college 
offers an interdisciplinary minor. 

The interdisciplinary minor differs from the standard minor in that 
it may require attainment of a predetermined and approved grade 
point average in the courses for the program and students are required 
to consult with an adviser regarding selection of course work. 

African Studies 
Afro- American Studies 
Gerontology 
International Studies 



Jewish Culture and Society 
Latina/Latino Studies 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 
Women's Studies 

TEACHER EDUCATION MAJORS FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE 
AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

See also teaching options in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, En- 
glish, Mathematics, Physics, Social Studies, and Speech listed above 
under majors. 

Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Computer Science 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of French 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of German 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Latin 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Russian 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Spanish 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINORS 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Cinema Studies 

Computer Science 

Earth Science 

English 

English as a Second Language 

French 

General Science 

German 

History 

Italian 

Latin 

Mathematics 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Portuguese 

Psychology 

Rhetoric 

Russian 

Social Studies 

Spanish 

Speech 

Women's Studies 

Combined Degree Programs 

LAS/ENGINEERING 

For a number of years, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the 
College of Engineering have jointly sponsored a five-year program 
leading to a B.A. or B.S. degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences and a B.S. 
degree in a field of engineering. The program allows motivated 
students to combine a professional engineering education with a 
broad liberal arts background. Students are required to complete all 
the degree requirements of both colleges. 

Freshmen normally apply for entrance through the College of 
Engineering, but students who have applied to and been accepted by 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may be able to enter the 
program. All students must meet the entrance requirements of both 
colleges. In addition, they may be required to meet the intercollegiate 
transfer requirements of both colleges. For further information about 
the program, students should consult their college office. 

LAS/COMMERCE 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences together with the College of 
Commerce and Business Administration offer two joint-degree pro- 
grams that lead to the degrees of B.A. or B.S. in Liberal Arts and 
Sciences and M.A.S. or M.B.A. Each program takes five years to 
complete. These programs allow students to complete master's pro- 
grams in accounting or business administration while they provide 
students with the broad opportunities unique to a liberal arts pro- 
gram. Students interested in these opportunities should contact the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 270 Lincoln Hall for additional 
information and advising. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



123 



BACCALAUREATE-MASTER OF ACCOUNTING SCIENCE DEGREE 
PROGRAM 

The B.A./B.S.-M.A.S. program is designed to enable the qualified 
student to earn both a bachelor's degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and the Master of Accounting Science degree in five 
years rather than the normal six years. The program integrates an 
undergraduate education with a professional education without di- 
luting the quality or purpose of either. Program objectives will be met 
primarily by the completion of courses during the student's fourth 
year that are simultaneously electives in the baccalaureate program 
and requirements for the M.A.S. degree. A student who is interested 
in the joint degree should contact a program adviser (in 270 Lincoln 
Hall) early in the initial year. 

The program is open to all students in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences who meet the requirements below. In most cases, partici- 
pants in the B.A./B.S.-M.A.S. program will complete their under- 
graduate majors by the end of the third year. As a consequence, some 
students will have to plan their course work carefully to meet their 
undergraduate educational objectives and to participate in the pro- 
gram; this will be particularly true for undergraduates whose majors 
require extensive sequential course work. 

Because the B.A./B.S.-M.A.S. program is based on careful course 
selection and program planning, an interested student should consult 
with a B.A./B.S.-M.A.S. adviser during the first year at the University. 
The program's objectives and requirements will be explained so that 
the student, in consultation with his or her baccalaureate degree 
program adviser, may plan course work to meet both objectives. 

A student who wishes to participate in the B.A./B.S.-M.A.S. pro- 
gram must make formal application by March 31 in the second 
semester of the junior year. To be eligible for consideration, the 
student must have at least a 3.25 cumulative grade point average, with 
at least 96 hours of course work completed, and at least a score of 550 
on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). 

BACCALAUREATE-MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEGREE 
PROGRAM 

The B.A./B.S.-M.B.A. program is designed to enable the qualified 
student to earn both a bachelor's degree in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences and the Master of Business Administration degree in five 
years rather than the normal six years. The program integrates an 
undergraduate education in a field such as English, political science, 
or economics with a professional business education without diluting 
the quality or purpose of either. Program objectives will be met 
primarily by the completion of courses during the student's fourth 
year that are simultaneously electives in the baccalaureate program 
and requirements for the M.B.A. degree. A student who is interested 
in the joint degree should contact the program adviser (in 270 Lincoln 
Hall) early in the first year. 

The program is open to all students in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences who meet the requirements below. In all cases, partici- 
pants in the B.A./B.S.-M.B.A. program must complete their under- 
graduate majors by the end of the third year. As a consequence, some 
students will have to plan their course work carefully to meet their 
undergraduate educational objectives and to participate in the pro- 
gram; this will be particularly true for undergraduates whose majors 
require extensive sequential course work. 

Since the B.A./B.S.-M.B.A. program is based on careful course 
selection and program planning, an interested student should consult 
with a B.A./B.S.-M.B.A. program adviser during the first year. The 
program's objectives and requirements will be explained so that the 
student, in consultation with his or her baccalaureate degree program 
adviser, may plan the course work to meet both objectives. A student 
who wishes to participate in the B.A./B.S.-M.B.A. program must 
make formal application by March 31 in the second semester of the 
junior year. To be eligible for consideration, the student must have at 
least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average on the last 45 hours of 
course work completed, with at least 96 hours of course work com- 
pleted by the beginning of the student's fourth year, and at least a score 
of 600 on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). 

Multidisciplinary Programs 

Two multidisciplinary majors are offered in the College. They are 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Russian and East Euro- 
pean Studies. 

The following units do not have formal undergraduate degree 
programs; however, a major may be created through the Individual 



Plans of Studies program and faculty advisers from one of the units. 
The units assist students interested in their subjects and coordinate 
research efforts in these areas. 

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES AND RESEARCH PROGRAM 

The Afro- American Studies and Research Program coordinates 
campus-wide curricular, research, and programming activities that 
concentrate on the population of African descent in North America, 
and to a lesser extent on the rest of the hemisphere. The program 
integrates multidisciplinary curricular offerings from the social 
sciences and the humanities. Five core faculty work with forty 
faculty affiliates in departments in the Colleges of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences; Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences; 
Communications; Education; Fine and Applied Arts; and Law. The 
Afro- American Studies office is located at 1201 West Nevada, 
Urbana, IL 61801. 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 

Atmospheric Sciences involves the application of physics, chemistry 
and mathematics to the study of problems ranging from the very small 
scale (formation of small aerosols and cloud particles, reactions be- 
tween atmospheric gases) to regional scales (variations in local to 
regional weather, local air pollution) to global scales (changes in 
climate, changes in global chemistry and physics affecting the ozone 
layer). The broad spectrum of activities in the atmospheric sciences, 
including environmentally related studies, are represented by the 
education and research opportunities within the department. 

Undergraduate course offerings include topics such as severe and 
unusual weather, climate and global change, atmospheric physics and 
chemistry, satellite and radar meteorology, weather analysis and 
forecasting, and several multidisciplinary courses intended for non- 
specialists including one which examines the role of interacting physi- 
cal, biological, and human processes of the global Earth System in 
shaping the past, present, and future environments in Illinois. For 
more information, please contact the Department of Atmospheric 
Sciences, 101 Atmospheric Sciences Building, 105 South Gregory, 
Urbana, IL 61801. 

CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES 

The Center for African Studies is concerned with all aspects of African 
affairs and cultures. The center sponsors instruction in African lan- 
guages and cultures, offering a number of African studies courses 
each semester. Support for graduate students and arrangements for 
field experiences in Africa are also concerns of the center. The Center 
for African Studies is located at 210 International Studies Building, 910 
South Fifth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

LATINA/LATINO STUDIES PROGRAM 

The Latina/ Latino Studies Program provides support for interdisci- 
plinary teaching, outreach, and research in Latina/Latino Studies. 
The Program coordinates a range of course offerings in various 
disciplines. It also coordinates the activities that enhance curricular 
offerings through conferences, lectures, and colloquia that reach out 
to the campus at large and to the Illinois community. The Latina/ 
Latino Studies Program is located at 510 E. Chalmers, Champaign, IL 
61820. 

WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM 

The Women's Studies Program is an interdisciplinary academic unit 
designed to teach, coordinate, and develop women's studies courses 
and advise undergraduate students. With over 40 affiliated faculty 
members, the program also initiates activities and programs to main- 
tain and expand scholarship on women and gender issues. The 
Women's Studies Program is located at 91 1 South Sixth Street, Cham- 
paign, IL 61820. 

Prelaw Advising 

Are you interested in attending law school or pursuing a career in the 
legal profession? The prelaw advising service in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, 270 Lincoln Hall, has information at all stages of an 
undergraduate career for students enrolled in any college on campus. 
Since "prelaw" is more a "state of mind" than a specific curricu- 
lum, students have great flexibility in pursing an undergraduate 
degree program and in selecting courses to prepare themselves for 
law school. Admission is based primarily on the undergraduate grade 
point average and the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) which 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



124 



students should plan on taking in the summer between their junior 
and senior years. Law schools admit students from almost every 
undergraduate background; for instance, among the students apply- 
ing to law school from the University in a recent year, no less than 
fortv-nine separate undergraduate majors were represented, and 
students were accepted from every college. 

On the other hand, if law schools could advise students as to what 
they should do, they would emphasize that students take a good, 
broad liberal education, and they would urge students to challenge 
themselves by moving to advanced-level courses as soon as they find 
a subject in which they have significant interest. Since law study places 
a high emphasis on verbal and analytic skills, course work in areas that 
develop such skills is often chosen; specifically classes in the humani- 
ties and social sciences that emphasize writing and reading compre- 
hension are helpful. The LAS Student Affairs Office has a one-page 
handout which suggests some courses that students interested in a 
career in law might find helpful. Also, students in the general curricu- 
lum and in sciences and letters majors in LAS can request a prelaw 
coding. Although this coding has no curriculum implications, it 
enables students to be placed on a mailing list which permits them to 
receive information mailed from the prelaw adviser. Students from 
other colleges without access to the prelaw coding can be placed on the 
mailing list by pro viding the prelaw secretary in 270 Lincoln Hall with 
their current addresses each semester. 

The prelaw secretary also oversees a "Letter of Recommenda- 
tion Service" that students planning to apply to law school can use 
from the beginning of their undergraduate program. Letters of 
recommendation can be solicited from faculty and be placed on file 
until the individual is ready to send off applications. Details can be 
obtained in 270 Lincoln Hall. 

When the student is ready to apply to law school, the prelaw 
adviser can help in overseeing the application process and in answer- 
ing questions about specific schools and their programs, about forms 
and procedures, and about where and when to apply. The adviser also 
can review with a student the personal statement and make students 
aware of special programs and opportunities, such as visits to campus 
from representatives of the law schools. 

The prelaw adviser also keeps a library of material from law 
schools and from Law Services which oversees the administration of 
the LSAT. LSAT booklets also are available in 270 Lincoln Hall. 
Additionally, admission statistics at all of the nearly 180 American Bar 
Association-approved law schools are available not only in The Guide 
to U.S. Law Schools published by Law Services, but also from the data 
compiled by the prelaw adviser. The Prelaw Handbook, which answers 
the most asked questions, and a pamphlet on the application process 
also can be obtained from the prelaw adviser. Some information on 
careers in law and on alternative directions with a law school educa- 
tion also can be found in the prelaw advising service. 

An informational meeting for freshmen prelaw students takes 
place in the fall of every year, and a similar meeting for third year 
students who will be in the process of applying to law school in the fall 
of their senior year is conducted each spring. Students can make an 
appointment with the prelaw adviser at any stage of their under- 
graduate programs to discuss these or other concerns. 

Teacher Education Curricula (Secondary) 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Education 
have developed a coherent set of experiences on campus, in schools, 
and in communities that will prepare our students to become skilled, 
knowledgeable, and committed teachers. There are two ways that 
students may obtain teacher certification through the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Students preparing for teacher certification in biology, chemis- 
try, earth science, English, mathematics, physics, social studies, and 
speech: These students complete a teaching option offered through an 
LAS major and the Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School 
Teaching. Upon completion of the option and the Teacher Education 
Minor in Secondary School Teaching, students will earn a Bachelor of 
Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences as 
well as teaching certification. Conferral of the degree of Bachelor of 
Science or Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to completion of the 
minor requires approval by petition to the LAS Student Affairs Office. 

Students preparing for teacher certification in any of five foreign 
languages — French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish — or in 
computer science: Students following these programs complete the 



requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of French (or 
German, etc. ) Education courses and other courses required for teacher 
certification are integrated within each curriculum. 

More detailed information pertaining to specific course require- 
ments for each of the programs in both groups is provided by aca- 
demic advisers . Only through regular communication with the teacher 
education adviser may the student be assured of the appropriateness 
of his or her program. Students are advised that certification require- 
ments may be altered at any time by the State Teacher Certification 
Board or by the legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled 
to satisfy the new requirements to qualify for the University's recom- 
mendation for certification. Also see the Council on Teacher Educa- 
tion section for information pertinent to all teacher education and 
specific areas of teacher education listed in the LAS Programs of Study 
section of this catalog. 

TEACHING OF BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, EARTH SCIENCE, 
ENGLISH, MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS, SOCIAL STUDIES, AND 
SPEECH 

Students following any of the teaching options in the Sciences and 
Letters Curriculum must complete all the course requirements for that 
curriculum. When they select their major, they may also select a "Pre- 
Teaching professional indicator", which reflects their intent to com- 
plete the requirements for teacher certification as part of their under- 
graduate program. 

Transfer into the Teaching Option within a major can be made only 
by students who have received approval to complete the Teacher 
Education Minor in Secondary School Teaching. Approval for the 
Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School Teaching is gained by 
successful application to the Department of Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion in the College of Education, upon recommendation by the subject 
area committees of the Council on Teacher Education. 

Two prerequisite courses must be completed before transfer to the 
Teaching Option in any major: EDPSY 21 1 and E P S 201. Additionally, 
each major stipulates other prerequisite courses that must be com- 
pleted before admission to the Teaching Option. Interested students 
should see the academic advisers in the major for information on 
prerequisite courses. 

Some students will be able to complete all the prerequisite courses 
for transfer into the Teaching Option of their major by the spring of 
their sophomore year; those students may be able to complete the 
requirements for the Bachelor's degree in LAS, the Teacher Education 
Minor in Secondary School Teaching and all other requirements for 
teacher certification in four years. 

Students who establish eligibility to transfer into the teaching 
option of their major in the spring of their junior year will need five 
years to satisfy the requirements for teacher certification. Those stu- 
dents, however, may be able to convert up to 15 hours of course credit 
in excess of the minimum required for the Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Bachelor's degree into graduate credit. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

The state of Illinois has mandated completion of certain general 
education requirements for all students applying for certification on 
or after July 1, 1992. These requirements are reflected in the general 
education categories listed below. Students should contact their ad- 
visers to be sure of degree and certification requirements in their 
particular areas. 

Students in LAS undergraduate programs leading to secondary 
certification will be expected to complete the following distribution. 
Courses used to meet the requirements must be from the Council on 
Teacher Education-approved course list. NOTE: The Council on 
Teacher Education-approved list is more restrictive than the LAS 
College course lists for general education. 

The distribution of these requirements is as follows: 

Communication: RHET 105 or 108, and SPCOM 101 or a speech 
performance elective, and one course approved by the university as 
satisfying the Composition II requirement. Alternatively, students 
may complete SPCOM 111 and 112, and one course satisfying the 
Composition II requirement. NOTE: Some departments specify par- 
ticular courses within their major to satisfy the Composition II re- 
quirement. 

Foreign Language: Students are expected to obtain knowledge of a 
foreign language equivalent to the completion of the fourth semester 
of college study in a language. The requirements can be satisfied in the 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

125 



same manner as the language requirement for the Sciences and Letters 
Curriculum. 

American or English Literature: One course. 

American History: One course. 

American Government: One course. 

One additional course chosen from literature and the arts, historical 
and philosophical perspectives, or social perspectives. 

Non- Western Culture: One course. 

Biological Science: One course. 

Physical Science; One course. 

One additional course in biological or physical science. One of the 
three courses in biological and /or physical science must have a 
laboratory. A minimum of 9 semester hours of science is required. 

Mathematics: One course applicable to the campus Quantitative 
Reasoning requirement. 

PSYCH 100 or equivalent. 

Health and Physical Development: Two hours. 

In addition, to satisfy state certification requirements a student 
must show on his or her transcript at least 15 hours of humanities 
courses. By the state definition, humanities courses are those in 
American history, English, history, literature, foreign language (in- 
cluding first- and second-year language courses for the foreign lan- 
guage requirement), art, music, theater, linguistics and philosophy. 
While most students in LAS teacher education programs will auto- 
matically have at least 15 hours of humanities under the state's 
definition, students should review their programs to ensure they do 
so. Any courses used for other requirements (foreign language, distri- 
bution requirements above, teaching major, teaching minors, etc.) 
may be counted in the 15 hours. 

TEACHING OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ALL FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 

This section contains a description of the requirements for programs 
leading to the bachelor's degree in teacher education. More detailed 
information pertaining to specific course requirements for each area of 
specialization is provided by faculty advisers. It is essential that the 
student fulfill the specific course requirements of his or her program 
in order to be eligible for the bachelor's degree in teacher education. 
Only through regular communication with the teacher education 
adviser may the student be assured of the appropriateness of his or her 
semester program. Students are advised that certification require- 
ments may be altered at any time by the State Teacher Certification 
Board or by the legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled 
to satisfy the new requirements to qualify for the University's recom- 
mendation for certification. Also see the Council on Teacher Educa- 
tion section for information pertinent to all teacher education cur- 
ricula. 

General education requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences must be fulfilled by students pursuing teacher education 
curricula in that college (see General Education requirements listed 
above). If the requirements of the teaching major satisfy the general 
education requirements in an area, they will be noted in the curricu- 
lum statement. For more information, consult the certification officer 
(130 Education Building). 

Transfer Between Programs 

Students should be advised that they may have to satisfy specific 
grade point average requirements for transfer into most specialized 
curricula and some majors. Contact an adviser or the LAS Student 
Affairs Office (270 Lincoln Hall) for specific information. 

Honors Programs 

DEAN'S LIST 

Each semester students are recognized by the college for placement on 
the Dean's List. Those students are eligible who meet the following 
criteria and are in the top 20 percent of their classes. To be eligible for 
Dean's List recognition, you must have completed at least 14 hours of 
course work, excluding military and religious foundation courses and 
graduate-level courses taken for unit credit. Of these 14 hours, at least 



12 hours must be earned in courses taken for traditional letter grades, 
which excludes courses graded credit/no credit, satisfactory/unsat- 
isfactory, and test-based credit, which is graded pass/fail. Course 
work completed through study abroad may be included in determin- 
ing Dean's List eligibility, subject to these same limitations. Students 
with work graded excused or deferred are not considered for the 
Dean's List until grades have been submitted for that work. These 
students should notify the honors dean when such work has been 
completed if they expect to be placed on the Dean's List. 

JAMES SCHOLAR PROGRAM 

The official honors program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
is called the Edmund J. James Scholar Program. This program allows 
students with exceptional ability to pursue rigorous academic study 
and provides the opportunity for those students to meet with faculty 
members on an individual basis. There are honors advisers available 
in some departments and an honors dean in the college office. James 
Scholars register in some special honors sections and they arrange 
individualized honors credit learning agreements for specific courses. 
James Scholars have open access to the University Library stacks 
(ordinarily open only to graduate students and the faculty); such 
access to library stacks is particularly helpful for students involved in 
independent study and/or undergraduate research projects. James 
Scholars also have their program requests processed early to mini- 
mize conflicts in scheduling honors courses. 

Any qualified LAS student may become a James Scholar Nominee. 
Entering freshmen in the top 15 percent of the admitted class are 
invited immediately into the program as James Scholar Nominees. In 
order to remain a James Scholar, students must maintain a cumulative 
grade point average of 3.5 and must complete two honors courses each 
academic year. Official certification of James Scholar standing on the 
University transcript is made at the end of the academic year (upon 
completion of these requirements). 

Further information about the James Scholar Program is available 
from the LAS Student Affairs Office, 270 Lincoln Hall. 

ROGERS MERIT SCHOLAR PROGRAM 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has established the Robert W. 
Rogers Merit Scholarship program for highly qualified freshmen. A 
freshman chosen as a Robert W. Rogers Scholar enrolls in any curricu- 
lum in the college and is awarded $1,000 for the year; the award may 
be renewed for the sophomore year if the student maintains at least a 
3.5 grade point average and continues in the college. Admitted fresh- 
men with the highest qualifications are invited to apply. The selection 
of a Rogers Scholar is made by a faculty committee and based on 
exceptional scholastic achievement, high performance on either the 
ACT or SAT examination, and evidence of leadership in the school or 
community. No more than twelve new awards are made each year. 
Rogers Scholars participate in an extended orientation with activities 
drawing on some of the University's academic and cultural resources. 

COHN SCHOLARS HONORS PROGRAM 

The Conn Scholars Program provides intellectual and financial sup- 
port and special academic opportunities for a small group of highly 
qualified freshmen majoring in the humanities. Each Cohn Scholar 
participates in a yearlong independent study course in his or her field 
of interest (or in a closely related field) with a faculty mentor from one 
of the humanities disciplines. The independent study course offers 
each student the opportunity to interact with a faculty member on an 
individual basis through intensive study in a selected subject. 

Cohn Scholars also enroll in a two-semester course sequence in 
Western civilization offered by the Department of History or the 
Program in Comparative Literature, with special discussion sections. 
Periodic seminars feature informal discussions among students and 
invited faculty members on selected topics. Cohn Scholars participate 
in special campus activities designed to acquaint them with some of 
the University's many academic and cultural resources. 

Applications to the program are invited in early spring from 
highly qualified high school students who have been admitted for the 
following year to one of the humanities departments or programs in 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Potential students are se- 
lected by a faculty committee on the basis of an application, high 
school class rank, and performance in a competitive entrance exami- 
nation (ACT or SAT). Inquiries should be addressed to the Cohn 
Scholars Program, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 294 Lincoln 
Hall, Urbana, IL 61801. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



126 



HONORS AT GRADUATION 

College honors at graduation are awarded on the basis of academic 
excellence and satisfaction of one of the following: (1) successful 
completion of 25 hours of honors courses (including work taken on 
honors credit learning agreements); (2) successful completion of 35 
hours of advanced hours course work; or (3) earning departmental 
distinction. Provided that one of the requirements above is satisfied, 
the award of college honors is made according to the following ranges: 
cum laude, if the college grade point average places a student in the 
top 12 percent of the graduating class but not in the top 7 percent; 
magna cum laude, if the college grade point average places a student 
in the top 7 percent of the graduating class but not in the top 3 percent; 
and summa cum laude, if the college grade point average places a 
student in the top 3 percent of the graduating class. 

DEPARTMENTAL DISTINCTION 

Students who have shown exceptional competence in one or more 
areas of study may earn distinction in their major(s) or curricula. 
Criteria for awarding distinction are established by the departments. 
Students interested in working for distinction should consult their 
honors adviser early in the junior year. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Invitations for membership into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest 
honor society, are sent to outstanding students in Liberal Arts and 
Sciences each April. Eligibility requires rank in the top 7 percent of 
seniors in LAS, as well as a minimum number of graded hours and 
appropriate course distribution. Precise criteria and detailed 
information may be obtained from the chapter secretary, Office of 
the Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Swanlund 
Building, University of Illinois, 601 East John Street, Champaign, IL 
61820, (217) 333-2353. 

AWARDS 

There are a number of prizes and awards available to outstanding 
students in certain areas of the college. A department will generally 
notify the student of the possibility of such an award; however, an 
interested student may obtain information on the awards from the 
college office, 270 Lincoln Hall. 

Study Abroad Programs 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences supports the Study Abroad 
Office to aid students who plan to study at approved foreign institu- 
tions or in programs of their choice other than those offered by 
departments within the college itself. The option is open not only to 
students in LAS, but also to students in other colleges within the 
University. A student's program for study abroad must have prior 
approval from the major department, the student's college, and the 
Study Abroad Office. Final determination of appropriate credit is 
made upon the student's completion of the work after returning to 
campus. LAS students are encouraged to consult with an Assistant 
Dean in the LAS Student Affairs Office (270 Lincoln Hall) before 
undertaking programs abroad to ensure their work overseas will be in 
conformity with UIUC courses. 

Students register in LAS 299 and may earn a maximum of 18 hours 
in a semester, 8 hours in a summer session, 36 semester hours for the 
academic year, or 44 hours for the calendar year. 

Four LAS language units sponsor programs abroad that are not 
restricted to language majors: the Department of French (one semester 
or academic year study in the Illinois Program in Paris); Department 
of Germanic Languages and Literatures (one semester or academic 
year in Vienna, Austria); Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portu- 
guese (an academic year at the University of Barcelona); and the 
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures (an academic year 
at Konan University in Kobe, Japan). In addition, the LAS College 
sponsors a limited number of summer session I courses at overseas 
sites for advanced work in majors and languages each May. 

Interested students should contact the appropriate department 
early in the fall semester prior to the year in which the overseas study 
is planned to receive details of course prerequisites, GPA require- 
ments and costs. 



Programs of Study 



Actuarial Science 



This major is sponsored by the Department of Mathematics and is 
designed to prepare students to enter the actuarial profession. See also 
Mathematics, Mathematics and Computer Science. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: OFFICE@math.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ACSCI.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 52-53 hours including 27 hours of mathematics beyond 
calculus. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: To qualify for distinction, the student must 
take MATH 372, have a grade point average in mathematics 
courses of at least 3.25, and pass at least six hours of examinations 
offered by the professional actuarial societies. To qualify for high 
or highest distinction, the student must have passed at least eight 
hours of professional exams, with highest distinction going to 
those whose grade point averages in mathematics are at least 3.75. 
Finance courses and additional professional exams may also be 
given consideration in close decisions. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

10-11 Calculus through MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables; 

or MATH 243 — Multivariable Calculus and Vector Analysis; 
or MATH 245 — Calculus, II; or equivalent 
3 Select from: 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing for Application to 
Engineering and Physical Science 
or 

C S 105 — Introduction to Computing with Application to 
Business and Commerce 
or 

C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science, or equivalent 

3 MATH 210— Theory of Interest 

4 MATH 308— Actuarial Statistics, I 
4 MATH 309— Actuarial Statistics, II 

3 MATH 369— Methods of Applied Statistics 

3 Select from: 

MATH 315 — Linear Transformation and Matrices 
or 

MATH 383 — Linear Programming 
3 Select one course from the following: 

ECON 372— Econometrics 1 

MATH 257— Numerical Methods 

MATH 370 — Actuarial Numerical Analysis 

MATH 376— Actuarial Risk Theory 

MATH 383 — Linear Programming (if not used to satisfy 
above requirement) 

MATH 393— Statistical Computing 

MATH 394— Time Series Analysis 
7 MATH 371— Actuarial Theory I and MATH 372— Actuarial 

Theory IF 
12 Four finance courses chosen in consultation with an adviser. 

Choose from: 

FIN 254 — Corporate Finance 

FIN 260 — Introduction to Insurance 

FIN 262 — Wealth Management and Life Insurance 

FIN 300— Financial Matters 

FIN 323 — International Corporate Finance 

FIN 341 — Property-Liability Insurance 

FIN 343 — Financial Risk Management of Insurance 
Enterprises 

FIN 345 — Corporate Risk Management 

FIN 360— Employee Benefit Plans 

FIN 361— Investments 

FIN 364 — International Financial Markets 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- or approved 200-level) courses in 
the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



127 



NOTE: The student is urged to elect ACCY 200 (or 201) or B ADM 261 in the junior or 
senior year. 

1. ECON 372 counts toward the 27 hours mathematics-beyond-calculus requirement. 

2. With adviser approval, students may substitute another course for MATH 372. The 
replacement course may be chosen from: MATH 313, 318, 344, 347, 358, 365, 368, 384; 
C S 225, 232, 300. 

AFRICAN STUDIES 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN AFRICAN STUDIES 

The Center for African Studies offers an interdisciplinary minor as a 
complement to any major. A minimum grade point average of 2.75 in 
African Studies courses is required for completion of the minor. 

The 21 hours selected by students for the African studies minor 
should form a coherent program of study. This program must be 
approved by the Center for African Studies. 

E-mail: african@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_AFRST.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

variable Study of, or demonstration of competence in, a foreign 

language of pertinence to African language studies to the 
level of the LAS foreign language requirement. Languages 
such as Arabic, Bambara, French, Zulu, Lingala, Portuguese, 
Swahili, and Wolof are pertinent. A student who chooses to 
satisfy this requirement with an indigenous African language 
(e.g., Arabic, Bambara, Lingala, Swahili, Wolof, or Zulu) may 
count the second year of language study toward satisfaction 
of 6 of the total hours required for the interdisciplinary 
minor. 

21 African studies core courses. These courses normally contain 

a minimum of 50 percent African content and are defined 
according to a list maintained and regularly updated by the 
Center for African Studies. Courses must include: 
3 hrs AFRST 222— Introduction to Modern Africa 
6 Maximum of six hours second year language study 

9 Courses approved for advanced hours (300-level or 

approved 200-level courses). 
Courses from at least two separate departments in addition to 
those of the center 

21 Total 

AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 

The Afro- American Studies and Research Program offers an interdis- 
ciplinary minor as a complement to any major. This minor represents 
a coherent vehicle for students who wish to structure and formalize 
their study of Afro-American subjects as part of their liberal educa- 
tion. The minor provides a strong intellectual complement to majors 
in various humanities and social sciences disciplines as well as to 
majors in preprofessional programs including law, medicine, social 
work, education, business, and urban planning. A minimum grade 
point average of 2.75 is required for completion of courses taken in this 
program. A student's plan of courses for the minor must be approved 
by the Afro- American Studies and Research Program. 

E-mail: aasrp®. uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_AFRO.html 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



HOURS 

21 



21 



REQUIREMENTS 

Courses in the Afro-American studies core, which consists of 
program courses and approved courses from other 
departments. Courses must include: 

3 hrs AFRO 100 — Introduction to Afro-American Studies 
3 AFRO 224 — Humanistic Perspectives of the Afro- 

American Experience 
3 AFRO 244 — Social Science Perspectives in Afro- 

American Studies 
No more than one course in addition to AFRO 100 from the 

100-level course offerings. 
3-6 hrs Approved 200-level courses 

6 Minimum of six hours of approved 300-level courses 

Total 



The Anthropology major and minor are administered by the Depart- 
ment of Anthropology. Anthropology, which views human biology, 
behavior, and society (both past and present) in a cross-cultural 
perspective, combines scientific and humanistic interests in a modern 
social sciences framework. It includes biological anthropology (bio- 
logical diversity and evolutionary history of human and nonhuman 
primates), archaeology (human prehistory and the organization and 
growth of technology), sociocultural anthropology (comparative study 
of social structures and institutions from hunter-gatherer settings to 
urban settings), and linguistic anthropology (comparative study of 
languages and communication). Although the student should strive 
for a topical and geographical balance, an undergraduate may special- 
ize in one of these four branches and may also study some world 
cultural area intensively through an area studies program. Anthropol- 
ogy is an appropriate major for those seeking a general liberal educa- 
tion; for those preparing for professional study and careers in law, 
medicine, or commerce; and for those planning further graduate 
study in anthropology. Professional anthropologists work as research 
scientists and teachers in museums, universities, and archaeological 
surveys; as staff members in government agencies, social service 
programs, and business firms in which international understanding 
of human and social concerns is important; or as independent consult- 
ants to such agencies, programs, and firms. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: anthro@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ANTH.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work equates to 54 
hours including 36 hours of Anthropology courses. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: To be eligible for distinction, a student must 
complete 40 hours of anthropology courses, maintain a 3.6 average 
in those hours, including at least 2 hours of ANTH 291 and at least 
2 hours of ANTH 293, and submit a thesis for judgment by the 
departmental honors board. 

All students must discuss their selection of anthropology courses and 
supporting course work with a departmental adviser. 

HOURS 

4 
4 
3 
3 



REQUIREMENTS 

ANTH 102 — Anthropology: Human Origins and Culture 
ANTH 103— Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 1 
ANTH 220 — Introduction to Archaeology 
ANTH 230 — Introduction to Social Anthropology and 
Ethnology 
3 ANTH 240 — Introduction to Biological Anthropology 

3 ANTH 270 — Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology 

12 Minimum of 12 hours which includes four courses at the 

advanced level (generally 291, 293, and 300-level), only one of 
these four courses may be ANTH 398. 

4 Elective in Anthropology 

18 Courses in another department. Of these courses, at least 9 

hours must be at the 300 level. Students may substitute an 
official minor offered by another department as long as the 
supporting course work, hours, and level requirements are 
met. 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) Anthro- 
pology courses must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 



1. ANTH 104 for honors students 



MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

The minor in anthropology may be tailored to each student's indi- 
vidual needs, thus accommodating students with interests as diverse 
as premedicine, prelaw, geography, and art history. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



128 



E-mail: anthro@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ANTH.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

6 Select at least two of the following courses: 

ANTH 220 — Introduction to Archaeology 
ANTH 230 — Introduction to Social Anthropology and 

Ethnology 
ANTH 240 — Introduction to Biological Anthropology 
ANTH 270 — Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology 
6 Minimum of six hours of advanced-level (300 or approved 

200) courses: this may not include more than a single offering 
of ANTH 398. 
6 Anthropology courses at any level 

18 Total required hours 

ART HISTORY 

Like the other humanities, the history of art as an undergraduate 
major offers an enrichment of and a preparation for life, rather than 
training for a specific occupation. The student who goes on to gradu- 
ate work in the field can look forward to becoming a teacher of the 
subject, to membership on the staff of a museum, or to employment in 
a commercial art gallery. 

Working in consultation with the undergraduate adviser for art 
history in the School of Art and Design, each student will design a 
program of study that satisfies the requirements listed below. Stu- 
dents who wish to take a considerable number of studio courses as 
part of their major should enroll in the history of art option offered by 
the School of Art and Design within the College of Fine and Applied 
Arts. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail address: art@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ARTH.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work equates to 47 
hours including 32 hours of Art History courses 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: To be eligible for distinction, a student must 
earn a high grade point average and complete at least 4 semester 
hours of independent research. See the undergraduate adviser for 
details. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

4 ARTHI 111— Ancient and Medieval Art 

4 ARTHI 112— -Renaissance and Modern Art 

24 200- and 300-level courses in Art History including one 3 hour 

course in each of the following areas: 1 
Ancient and medieval art 
Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo art 
Late eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century art 
African, Asian, Oceanic, and pre-Columbian art 
15 200- and 300-level courses in supporting areas chosen with 

the approval of the adviser. Although the program in art 
history allows considerable latitude in the selection of such 
courses, they should be chosen with the goal of enhancing the 
student's understanding of the cultural context within which 
works of art and architecture have been created. Recent 
practice suggests that supporting courses will most 
commonly be drawn from such fields as anthropology, 
classics, history, literature, music and dance history, 
philosophy, psychology, and religious studies. 

Twelve hours of ad vanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. French or Ger- 
man is strongly recommended for fulfilling the foreign language 
requirement; however, another language may be used with the ap- 
proval of the adviser as the needs of the student's program dictate. A 
student who has decided to make the history of Oriental art his or her 
major study area in undergraduate and graduate work would be well 
advised to satisfy the foreign language requirement with Chinese or 
Japanese rather than with a European language. 



A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 



1. Courses in the history of architecture, excluding ARCH 210, may be used with the 
approval of the adviser for as many as 12 hours of credit in meeting the 24 hour 
requirement. 

ASTRONOMY 

The major in astronomy, administered by the Department of As- 
tronomy, is based upon both a broad and an in-depth exploration into 
astronomy and allied disciplines, and is an excellent way to gain a 
general science education. It may be chosen by students who wish to 
have an astronomy research career or an astronomy background for 
use in related fields, such as working in national laboratories, obser- 
vatories, planetariums, NASA, aerospace industry, many computer- 
related fields, journalism, or science writing to name a few. As- 
tronomy courses can also be customized to satisfy a secondary field for 
the undergraduate curriculum in General Engineering. 

Astronomy students are also encouraged to minor in a second field 
such as chemistry, computer science, geology, or mathematics. Spe- 
cific programs of study in other areas such as biology, economics, 
English, history, or journalism for individual students can be de- 
signed and periodically updated through mutual discussions be- 
tween the students and their academic advisers. All students, espe- 
cially those interested in pursuing astronomy research as a career, 
should take part in independent study or research projects with 
faculty members as part of the astronomy major curriculum. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: astronomy@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kmgbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ASTR.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 44-48 hours. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction. A student majoring in astronomy may earn 
distinction by attaining a minimum grade point average of 3.5 in 
300-level astronomy, math, and physics courses. Students desiring 
distinction should consult with an astronomy adviser before the 
senior year. 



HOURS 
3-6 



1 

10-11 



12 



18 



REQUIREMENTS 

Select from: 

ASTR 100 — Perspectives in Astronomy 
or 

ASTR 121— The Solar System and ASTR 122— Stars and 
Galaxies 
or 

ASTR 210— General Astronomy 
ASTR 301 — Scientific Writing for Astronomers 
Math: select from the following: 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry I, MATH 
130 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II, and MATH 
242 — Calculus of Several Variables or equivalent 
or 

MATH 135— Calculus, and MATH— 245 Calculus, II 
PHYCS 111— General Physics ( Mechanics), 
PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism), 
PHYCS 113— General Physics (Fluids and Thermal Physics) 
and PHYCS 114 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum 
Physics) 

Minimum of 18 hours of 300-level astronomy and physics 
courses (excluding PHYCS 319), of which at least 10 hours 
must be astronomy courses 



Recommended courses for students intending to pursue graduate 
study in Astronomy: MATH 225 or MATH 315, MATH 280 , MATH 
285, PHYCS 225, PHYCS 301, PHYCS 326, PHYCS 335, PHYCS 336, 
PHYCS 361, PHYCS 365, PHYCS 386, PHYCS 387. 

Twelve hours of advanced-level (300 or approved 200) Astronomy/ 
Physics courses must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



129 



MINOR IN ASTRONOMY 

The minor in astronomy is designed to broaden the student's knowl- 
edge of science and our place in the universe. The minor in Astronomy 
will benefit especially those students who are eager to learn as- 
tronomy but who do not anticipate it to be their career. The Astronomy 
minor is also suitable for students who intend to pursue careers in 
areas that may benefit from a good knowledge of astronomy such as 
aerospace industry, science writing, scientific journalism, or science 
teaching in schools. 

E-mail: astronomy@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kmgbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ASTR.html 



HOURS 

12 



18 



REQUIREMENTS 

Select from the following: 

ASTR 100 — Perspectives in Astronomy 

ASTR 121— The Solar System 

ASTR 122— Stars and Galaxies 

ASTR 210— General Astronomy 

ASTR 304— Astrophysics, I 

ASTR 305— Astrophysics, II 

ASTR 314 — Astronomical Techniques 
Additional Astronomy courses at any level (four of the six 
hours must be from courses other than ASTR 199 and ASTR 
290) 
Total 



NOTE: Credit in ASTR 100, 121, 122, and 210 may be mutually exclusive (see the 
Courses catalog for details). 

ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 

See Multidisciplinary Programs. 
E-mail: dept@uiatma.atmos.uiuc.edu 
Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ATMOS.html 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



MAJOR IN SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

A total of at least 120 semester hours of course work as outlined below, 
with a minimum 2.0 academic grade point average required for 
graduation. In addition, in order to graduate, students must attain a 
2.0 average in the chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics, physics, and 
advanced electives in life science courses specified in this curriculum. 
All proposals for substitutions must be approved by the faculty 
adviser. This curriculum is intended for those students who desire a 
rigorous education in chemistry, biochemistry, and the life sciences, 
but whose career objectives require sufficient flexibility to obtain 
proficiency in other areas as well. 

For information regarding the cooperative education program in 
the School of Chemical Sciences, see the chemistry major in the 
Sciences and Letters Curriculum. 

E-mail: inquiry@scs.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_BIOCH.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry 

General education: All campus general education requirements must 
be satisfied. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: In addition to meeting the above require- 
ments, a student seeking distinction must satisfy the following: 

a. Complete 10 hours of BIOCH 292. 

b. Earn at least a 3.0 grade point average. 

c. Present a senior thesis for deposit in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 12 

9-11 General chemistry, select from: 

CHEM 107— Accelerated Chemistry, I; CHEM 108— 
Accelerated Chemistry, II; CHEM 109— Accelerated 
Chemistry Laboratory, I; and CHEM 110 — Accelerated 
Chemistry Laboratory, II 
or 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 
Chemistry Laboratory, CHEM 102— General Chemistry 
(Biological or Physical Version) and CHEM 106 — 
General Chemistry Laboratory, CHEM 223— 



Quantitative Analysis Lecture, and CHEM 224 — 
Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 
8-9 Organic chemistry, select from: 

CHEM 236— Fundamental Organic Chemistry, I; CHEM 
237— Structure and Synthesis; CHEM 336— 
Fundamental Organic Chemistry, II 
or 

CHEM 231— Elementary Organic Chemistry; CHEM 234— 
Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory; CHEM 
331 — Organic Chemistry 
7-8 Physical chemistry: select from: 

CHEM 340— Principles of Physical Chemistry and BIOCH 
346 — Physical Biochemistry 
or 

CHEM 342— Physical Chemistry and CHEM 344— Physical 
Chemistry, II 
14 Biochemistry: 

BIOCH 352— General Biochemistry 
BIOCH 353— General Biochemistry 
BIOCH 355 — Biochemistry Laboratory 
BIOCH 356 — Lectures on Biochemistry Laboratory 
Methods 
10-11 Mathematics, select from: 

MATH 135— Calculus, and MATH 245— Calculus, II 
or 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I; MATH 
130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II; and MATH 
242 — Calculus of Several Variables 
10-12 Physics, Select from: 

PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound), 
and PHYCS 102— General Physics (Light, Electricity, 
Magnetism, and Modern Physics) or equivalent as approved 
by academic adviser 
6 Advanced electives in life sciences (300 level) 

variable Nontechnical Requirements: 3 
General education: 

Foreign language — four semesters of college study (or four 

years of high school study) in a single foreign language 

Composition I writing requirement (RHET 105, RHET 108, 

SPCOM 111 and 112, or equivalent) 
Composition II writing requirement 4 
Humanities/Arts to satisfy the campus general education 

requirements 
Social/Behavioral sciences to satisfy the campus general 

education requirements 
Cultural Studies to satisfy the campus general education 
requirement 5 
variable Electives 

(not including any credit in satisfaction of the above 
requirements) 



1. Transfer credit must be approved by an adviser in biochemistry in order to be used 
to satisfy degree requirements. 

2. A more detailed description of the requirements is listed in the Biochemistry 
Curriculum Brochure, available in room 420A of Roger Adams Laboratory. 

3. The requirements for the Campus General Education categories Natural Sciences 
and Technology and Quantitative Reasoning I are fulfilled through required course 
work in the curriculum. 

4. The course taken to satisfy the Composition II requirement may also be used to 
partially satisfy one of the core chemistry, advanced chemistry, physics, or technical 
electives requirements (if appropriate), or may be used to partially satisfy the free 
electives requirements. 

5. Thecourses taken to satisfy Western and/or Non-Western Civilization requirements 
may also be used to satisfy nontechnical and/or free elective categories. 

BIOENGINEERING 

An option in Bioengineering is sponsored by the School of Life 
Sciences; see Life Sciences. In addition, a minor in Bioengineering is 
available within the College of Engineering; see Engineering section. 

BIOLOGY 

Options in Biology General, Biology Honors, and Teaching of Biology 
are sponsored by the School of Life Sciences. 

E-mail: lifesci@life.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_BIOL.html 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN BIOLOGY 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



130 



Electives totaling 12 hours are to be chosen from the various 
departments in the School of Life Sciences, in consultation with the 
adviser. An attempt should be made to obtain background in each of 
the general areas in the School of Life Sciences to give the student 
minoring in the teaching of biological sciences as much breadth as 
possible as a prospective biology teacher. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

12-15 Principles of biology 

Select one group of courses: 
BIOL 104 — Animal Biology 
PLBIO 100— Plant Biology 
BIOL 210— Genetics 
or 

BIOL 120 — Genetics, Evolution, and Biodiversity 
BIOL 121 — Ecology and Organismic Biology 
BIOL 122— Molecular and Cellular Biology 
12 Electives to be taken in the life science areas chosen in 

consultation with the biology education adviser 
24-27 Total hours 

Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach 
middle grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 
Education Building for additional information. 

BIOPHYSICS 

An option in Biophysics is sponsored by the School of Life Sciences. 
See Life Sciences. 

CARIBBEAN STUDIES 

See Latin American Studies. 

CELL AND STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY 

An option in Cell and Structural Biology is sponsored by the School of 
Life Sciences. See Life Sciences. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

MAJOR IN SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 

The chemical engineering curriculum is arranged in a flexible manner 
to permit students to use their elective hours and to substitute courses 
in order to arrange programs incorporating various specific areas of 
chemical engineering or interdisciplinary areas. For example, se- 
quences can be set up in conjunction with the student's adviser to 
emphasize environmental engineering, bioengineering, computer 
science, or one of many other options. It will be advantageous to the 
student to plan course sequences with an adviser as early in the 
student's academic career as possible. 

Students entering without adequate preparation in mathematics 
and chemistry may find it difficult to complete the chemical engineer- 
ing curriculum in four years. A typical program, including all re- 
quired courses and electives, is shown below. Individual students 
may vary the order in which the various courses are taken to suit their 
individual needs. However, care must be exercised in scheduling to 
ensure that necessary course prerequisites are met. 

Students in the curriculum of chemical engineering must maintain 
a 2.5 general average, excluding military training in order to be 
accepted by the department as juniors and seniors. 

For information regarding the cooperative education program 
and internships in the School of Chemical Sciences, see the Chemistry 
major in the Science and Letters curriculum. 

E-mail: chemeng@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CH_E.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

General education: All campus general education requirements must 
be satisfied. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 129 hours including 16 
hours of approved social sciences and humanities sequences 

Departmental distinction: A student is recommended for departmen- 
tal distinction on the basis of grade point average and work 
presented in CH E 292— Senior Thesis or CH E 390— Projects. 



First year 



HOURS 

3 
1 
5 
4 
3 
16 

1 

3 
2 
3 

3 
4 
16 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CHEM 107 1 — Accelerated Chemistry, I 

CHEM 109 — Accelerated Chemistry Laboratory, I 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I 

RHET 105 or 108 — Composition I writing requirement 

Elective" 

Total 

SECOND SEMESTER 

CH E 161 — The Chemical Engineering Profession 

CHEM 108— Accelerated Chemistry, II 

CHEM 110 — Accelerated Chemistry Laboratory, II 

C S 101 — Introduction to Computing for Engineering and 

Physical Science 

MATH 130— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics) 

Total 



Second year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CH E 261 — Introduction to Chemical Engineering 

CHEM 236— Fundamental Organic Chemistry, I 

CHEM 237— Structure and Synthesis 

MATH 242— Calculus of Several Variables 

PHYCS 112— General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism) 

Total 



3 
4 
2 
3 
4 
16 

4 
3 

2 
3 

2 
3 
17 



SECOND SEMESTER 

CH E 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

CHEM 336 4 — Fundamental Organic Chemistry, II 

MATH 225 5 — Introductory Matrix Theory 

MATH 285 — Differential Equations and Orthogonal 

Functions 

PHYCS 114— General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics) 

Electives 2 - 6 

Total 



Third year 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CH E 371— Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 

CHEM 319 — Instrumental Characterization of Chemical 

Systems Laboratory 

CHEM 321 — Instrumental Characterization of Chemical 

Systems 

CHEM 342— Physical Chemistry, I 

Electives 2,6 

Total 



4 
3 
15 

4 
4 
9 
17 



SECOND SEMESTER 

CH E 373 — Mass Transfer Operations 
CHEM 344— Physical Chemistry, II 
Electives 2,6 
Total 



Fourth yeor 



FIRST SEMESTER 

CH E 374 — Chemical Engineering Laboratory 

CH E 381 — Chemical Rate Processes and Reactor Design 

CH E 389 — Chemical Process Control and Dynamics 

Electives 2,6 
Total 



4 
3 
3 
6 
16 

4 
2 

10 
16 



SECOND SEMESTER 

CH E 377 — Synthesis and Design of Chemical Systems 
CH E 390 — Individual Chemical Engineering Projects 
Electives 2,6 
Total 



1. Students who do not place into CHEM 107, or who do not satisfy the mathematics 
prerequisite for CHEM 107, may substitute the sequence CHEM 101, 102, 105, 106, 223, 
and 224 for CHEM 107, 108, 109, and 110. 

2. All Campus General Education requirements must be satisfied, including those in 
approved course work in the Humanities/Arts, Social/Behavioral Sciences, and 
Cultural Studies, including the Western, Non-Western and/or U.S. Minorities 
components. The requirements for the Campus General Education categories Natural 
Sciences/Technology, Quantitative Reasoning I, and Composition I and II are fulfilled 
through required course work in the curriculum. 

3. One year of college credit in one foreign language is required. Two years of high 
school credit in one foreign language are equivalent to one year of college credit. 

4. BIOCH 350 may be substituted for CHEM 336. 

5. Students may substitute MATH 315 for MATH 225. Students electing to do so 
should be certain that they have the prerequisites for MATH 315. 

6. Students must take at least 18 hours of technical electives in fields such as chemical 
engineering science. These must include at least 5 hours of chemical engineering 
electives plus at least 3 additional hours of 300-level electives (or CH E 292). Students 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



131 



should consult their departmental advisers for a current list of courses that may be 
used to satisfy this requirement. 

CHEMISTRY 

Students may pursue chemistry by following either the specialized 
curriculum in chemistry (leading to the Bachelor of Science in Chem- 
istry), or one of two options in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum 
(leading to the Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences). The 
department also sponsors a minor in chemistry and a teacher educa- 
tion minor in chemistry. These programs of study are administered by 
the Department of Chemistry. 

The chemistry option in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum is 
used by some students planning chemistry careers, but it is more often 
chosen by students wishing to obtain chemistry backgrounds for use 
in related fields. In contrast, the specialized curriculum in chemistry 
is a rigorous, specialized program suitable for those planning careers 
in chemistry. It meets standards prescribed by the American Chemical 
Society. 

Cooperative Education Program: Students accepted into the School of 
Chemical Sciences Cooperative Education Program spend alternate 
periods of attendance at the University with periods of employment 
in industry or government. Transcript recognition is given as well as 
a certificate of participation at graduation. Additional information 
and applications are available in the School of Chemical Sciences 
placement and advising office. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

Students must select one option. 

Chemistry Option 

E-mail: r-simon@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CHEM.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 48-51 hours including at least 30 hours in Chemistry 
courses 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: Students qualify for graduation with dis- 
tinction by exhibiting superior performance in both course work 
and in senior thesis research. To be eligible, a student must have a 
minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and must com- 
plete a senior thesis course (at least 6 hours of Chemistry 292). 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

30 Chemistry and biochemistry courses 1 including: 

CHEM 340— Principles of Physical Chemistry or CHEM 

342— Physical Chemistry, I 
4-8 hrs Two other 300-level courses, at least one of which 
must be outside physical chemistry. 
10-11 Mathematics through MATH 242— Calculus of Several 

Variables, or MATH 245— Calculus, II 
8-10 PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound) 

and PHYCS 102— General Physics (Light, Electricity, 
Magnetism, and Modern Physics) or PHYCS 111 — General 
Physics (Mechanics) and PHYCS 112— General Physics 
(Electricity & Magnetism) 

Twelve hours advanced-level courses (numbered 292 or 300 or higher) 
in Chemistry and /or Biochemistry must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

NOTE: Transfer credit in chemistry must be approved by an adviser in chemistry in 
order to be included in the 30 hours. 



1. Excluding CHEM 100, 103, 115, 122, and 199. 

Chemistry Teaching Option 

This option is designed to prepare the student to teach physical 
science with a major in chemistry and a second teaching field in 
physics or mathematics. A student must have at least 2.5 cumulative 
and University of Illinois grade point averages to remain in the 
teaching option. A student must also maintain at least a 2.0 grade point 
average in all attempts at science and mathematics courses taken at the 
University of Illinois in order to remain in the teaching option. 



A student must elect a second teaching field in either mathematics 
or physics. Completion of the second teaching field involves complet- 
ing all requirements for the teacher education minor in that field. 

E-mail: r-simon@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CHEM.html 
Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Minimum required courses normally equate to 50-64 hours 
General education: See the description of the general education re- 
quirements elsewhere in this catalog. Students may need addi- 
tional hours in humanities to complete the 15-hour minimum 
required for certification. 
Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 
Departmental distinction: Students in this major may earn distinction, 
high distinction, or highest distinction. Distinction is awarded on 
the basis of performance in student teaching and academic achieve- 
ment. 
Prerequisites to transfer to the Teaching Option: EDPSY 21 1; E P S 201; 
CHEM 107, 108, 109, 110 (or CHEM 101 and 105, 102 and 106, 223, 
224); CHEM 236 and 237 (or CHEM 231 and 234); MATH 120 and 
MATH 130 must be completed prior to transfer into the teaching 
option. 

In addition to the requirements for the option listed below, students 
must complete the Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School 
Teaching (36 hours). Conferral of the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to completion of the minor 
requires approval by petition to the LAS Student Affairs Office. 
While it is possible to complete this program in eight semesters, 
many students may require an extra semester or two. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

9-11 CHEM 107— Accelerated Chemistry I, CHEM 108— 

Accelerated Chemistry II, CHEM 109— Accelerated Chemistry 
Laboratory I, and CHEM 110 — Accelerated Chemistry 
Laboratory II (or CHEM 101 and 105, CHEM 102 and 106, 223, 
and 224) 

5-6 CHEM 236— Fundamental Organic Chemistry, I and CHEM 

237— Structure and Synthesis (or 231 and 234) 

4 CHEM 340— Principles of Physical Chemistry or CHEM 342 

8 At least eight additional hours of 300-level chemistry course 

work. At least one 300-level course must be outside physical 
chemistry. 

8 MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I and Math 

130 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 

10 At least 10 hours of general physics, including PHYCS 112 

6-17 Additional mathematics or physics to complete a second 

teaching field 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in Chemistry must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

MAJOR IN SPECIALIZED CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 

The typical program of courses required to satisfy this degree totals 
128-134 hours; in no case will a program totaling less than 120 hours 
qualify for graduation. Graduation requires grade point averages of at 
least 2.0 overall and 2.0 in chemistry, mathematics, and physics 
courses. The Department of Chemistry will supply, upon request, a 
brochure showing recommended semester-by-semester programs for 
the completion of the curriculum. 

Each graduate of the professional curriculum in chemistry is 
certified to the American Chemical Society as having met its specifi- 
cations for professional education in chemistry. 

E-mail: r-simon@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CHEM.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

General education: All campus general education requirements must 
be satisfied. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: Students qualify for graduation with dis- 
tinction by exhibiting superior performance in both course work 
and in senior thesis research. To be eligible, a student must have an 
overall grade point average of at least 3.0 and must complete a 
senior thesis course (at least 6 hours of CHEM 292). 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



132 



HOURS 

35' 



11 



11 



10 



14 



variable 



31 



REQUIREMENTS 
Core Chemistry: 

CHEM 107— Accelerated Chemistry, I 
CHEM 108— Accelerated Chemistry, II 
CHEM 109— Accelerated Chemistry' Laboratory, I 
CHEM 110 — Accelerated Chemistry Laboratory, II 2 
CHEM 236 — Fundamental Organic Chemistry, I 
CHEM 237 — Structure and Synthesis 
CHEM 315 — Inorganic Chemistry 

CHEM 319 — Instrumental Characterization of Chemical 
Systems Laboratory 

CHEM 321 — Instrumental Characterization of Chemical 
Systems 

CHEM 336 — Fundamental Organic Chemistry, II 
CHEM 342— Physical Chemistry, I 
CHEM 344— Physical Chemistry, II 

CHEM 345 — Physical Principles of Chemistry Laboratory, I 
Advanced Chemistry: 

Chemistry/Biochemistry courses numbered 300 or higher 
which must include one from the following: 3 
CHEM 316 — Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 
CHEM 337— Organic Chemistry 

CHEM 347 — Physical Properties of Chemistry Laboratory, 
II 
Additional laboratory work: 3 - 4 

BIOCH 355— Biochemistry Laboratory and BIOCH 356— 

Lectures on Biochemistry Laboratory Methods 
CHEM 316 — Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 
CHEM 322— Separation Methods 
CHEM 323— Electronic Circuits, I 
CHEM 337— Organic Chemistry 
CHEM 338 — Separation, Purification, and Identification of 

Organic Compounds 
CHEM 347 — Physical Principles of Chemistry Laboratory, 

II 
CHEM 392— Solid State Structural Analysis 
Additional chemistry/biochemistry courses to complete the 
11-hour requirement in advanced chemistry 
Mathematics: 1 

MATH 120— Calculus and Analytic Geometry, I; MATH 
130 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, II; and MATH 242— 
Calculus of Several Variables; or equivalent 
Physics: 1 

PHYCS 111— General Physics (Mechanics), PHYCS 112— 
General Physics (Electricity and Magnetism), and PHYCS 
114 — General Physics (Waves and Quantum Physics), or 
equivalent 
Technical Electives, including the following: 

Required Mathematics: 4 MATH 388 — Mathematical 

Methods in Engineering and Science; or MATH 225 — 
Introductory Matrix Theory and MATH 285 — 
Differential Equations and Orthogonal Functions, or 
equivalent 5 
Strongly Recommended: CHEM 292 — Senior Thesis 

(maximum of 10 hours) 
Recommended: basic computer science 
Other technical courses chosen from: 
Chemistry (300 or higher), biochemistry, chemical 

engineering (200 or higher) 
Courses in life sciences (all courses at 200 or higher) 
Mathematics or computer science above the basic level 
Other courses in the physical and biological sciences and 
engineering including CHEM 199 6 
Nontechnical Requirements: 7 
General education: 

Foreign language — two semesters of college study (or two 

years of high school study) in a single foreign language 
Composition I writing requirement (RHET 105, RHET 108, 

SPCOM 111 and 112, or equivalent) 
Composition II writing requirement 8 
Humanities/Arts to satisfy the campus general education 

requirements 
Social/Behavioral sciences to satisfy the campus general 

education requirements 
Cultural Studies to satisfy the campus general education 
requirement ' 
Free elective 10 



1. Hours given are those typical to meet requirement. 

2. If necessary, CHEM 101 and 105, 102 and 106, 223, and 224 may be substituted for 
CHEM 107, 108, 109, and 110. Warning: CHEM 223 and 224 are offered only in the fall 
semester. 

3. The course chosen from CHEM 316, 337, or 347 cannot be used to satisfy the 
chemistry lab requirement. 

4. Students who present less than 6 semester hours credit in CHEM 292 for graduation 
must complete two additional courses chosen from the list. Students who will present 



at least 6 semester hours credit in CHEM 292 for graduation are required to complete 
only one laboratory course from the list. 

5. Students contemplating transfer to the chemical engineering curriculum should 
choose MATH 225 and 285. 

6. Three hours maximum credit. Additional courses in the sciences and engineering 
can be taken upon the approval of the chair of the chemistry department advising 
committee. Most approved courses must have a strong technical prerequisite, such as 
one year of college-level math or science. 

7. The requirements for the Campus General Education categories Natural Sciences 
and Technology and Quantitative Reasoning I are fulfilled through required course 
work in the curriculum. 

8. The course taken to satisfy the Composition II requirement may also be used to 
partially satisfy one of the core chemistry, advanced chemistry, mathematics, physics, 
or technical electives requirements (if appropriate), or may be used to partially satisfy 
the free electives requirements. 

9. The courses taken to satisfy Western and /or Non-Western Civilization requirements 
may also be used to satisfy nontechnical and/or free elective categories. 

10. Restrictions: (1) Courses preparatory to or used tosatisfy the minimum requirements 
specified in the above requirements may not be included as free electives. (2) No first- 
year foreign language course (e.g., 101,102, or equivalent) may be included unless it 
is a different language than used to satisfy the foreign language nontechnical 
requirement. 

MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

E-mail: r-simon@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 

http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CHEM.html 



HOURS 

10 



4 
20 



REQUIREMENTS 

Maximum of 10 hours of Chemistry courses numbered 110 or 

lower. 

Minimum of 6 hours of advanced Chemistry and/or 

Biochemistry courses (numbered 292 or higher and 300-level) 

Chemistry courses selected in consultation with adviser 

Total 1 



1. CHEM 100 may not count in the 20 hours. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN CHEMISTRY 

Teacher Education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. 

E-mail: r-simon@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CHEM.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 1 

10-11 General chemistry, select from: 

CHEM 107— Accelerated Chemistry, I; CHEM 108— 
Accelerated Chemistry, II; CHEM 109— Accelerated 
Chemistry Laboratory, I; CHEM 110-Accelerated 
Chemistry Laboratory, II 
or 

CHEM 101— General Chemistry and CHEM 105— General 
Chemistry Laboratory; CHEM 102 — General Chemistry 
(Biological or Physical Version) and CHEM 106 — 
General Chemistry Laboratory; and CHEM 223 — 
Quantitative Analysis Lecture, and CHEM 224 — 
Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (CHEM 
122-Elementary Quantitative Analysis may be taken as 
an alternative to CHEM 223 and 224) 

5 Elementary organic chemistry including laboratory 

10-12 Chemistry or other physical science courses 

25-28 Total 



1. Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach middle 
grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 Education Building for 
additional information. 

CINEMA STUDIES 



MINOR IN CINEMA STUDIES 

Cinema studies, administered by the Unit for Cinema Studies, is an 
interdisciplinary curriculum with courses offered in a variety of 
departments. The minor is structured to provide students with certain 
core courses in the discipline while also allowing the freedom to 
explore various approaches to the subject presented by different 
departments. A Cinema Studies Option is also available (see Humani- 
ties). 

Students should consult the Unit for Cinema Studies for more 
information on the minor and for schedules of cinema studies courses 
offered each semester. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



133 



E-mail: cinema@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.Ias.uiuc.edu/las/p_Cine.html 



HOURS 

3 



21 



REQUIREMENTS 

ENGL 104— Introduction to Film, or ENGL 273— Intermediate 

Film Studies: Directors, Genres, Themes 

CINE 261 — Survey of World Cinema I: The Beginnings 

Through the Coming of Sound, and CINE 262 — Survey of 

World Cinema II: The Thirties to the Present 

Minimum of 6 hours of two foreign language cinema studies 

courses. (These include but are not limited to courses on 

French, German, East European, Japanese, Russian, and 

Scandinavian cinema. Please note that all cinema studies 

courses are taught in English.) 

Minimum of 6 hours of two additional cinema studies 

courses. 

Total 



1. At least 6 hours cf 300-level courses must be included in the above. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN CINEMA STUDIES 

Teacher education minors are available only to students in teaching 
majors. This minor does not lead to an endorsement in an additional 
teaching field. 

Upon electing this minor, a student should consult with the 
academic adviser of the Unit for Cinema Studies for assignment to a 
faculty adviser. The sequence of courses counted toward completion 
of this minor must be approved in writing by the cinema studies 
adviser prior to the completion of the student's sixth semester. See the 
cinema studies section in the Timetable each semester for a list of 
courses currently being offered. Contact the Unit for Cinema Studies 
for a more detailed description of these courses. 

E-mail: cinema@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_Cine.html 



HOURS 

3 



REQUIREMENTS 

ARTCI 180— Introduction to Cinematography, ARTCI 280— 

Basic Cinematography, or ARTCI 380 — Cinematography, or 

equivalent 

CINE 261 — Survey of World Cinema I: The Beginnings 

Through the Coming of Sound 

CINE 262— Survey of World Cinema II: The Thirties to the 

Present, or CINE 361 — Film Theory and Criticism 

ENGL 104— Introduction to Film 

HUMAN 297 — Special Topics: Junior Seminar and Tutorial, 

or equivalent 1 

Other cinema studies courses 2 

Total 



1. The cinema studies adviser may approve a specific substitution for the 
cinematography and the junior seminar/ tutorial requirements if the student is unable 
to secure these courses. 

2. This total must include courses in at least two different departments in the 
humanities. It must also include at least 3 hours at the 300 level. 

CLASSICS 

The study of the languages and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome 
is valuable for those seeking a broad education in the liberal arts or 
preparing for graduate study in one of the many fields of Classical, 
Medieval, or Renaissance scholarship. It is also excellent preparation 
for the advanced study of law and medicine; it is increasingly admired 
in the business world. Within the general requirements of the major, 
the Department of theClassics offers individual programs designed to 
meet the needs and interests of each student. Close interaction be- 
tween faculty and students, individual attention, tutorial instruction, 
opportunity for study abroad in Greece and Italy, and the unmatched 
resources of the Classics Library and the collections of ancient art and 
other objects from classical antiquity in the museums on campus 
provide unique advantages for the pursuit of classical studies. 

The department sponsors minors in Classical Archaeology, Clas- 
sical Civilization, Greek, Latin, and a Teacher Education Minor in 
Latin. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: classics@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CLASS.html 



Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 

equates to 42-48 hours. 
General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 
Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 
Departmental distinction: Students seeking departmental distinction 
must have at least a 3.5 average in relevant courses and should 
consult a member of the department's honors committee at the 
earliest opportunity. 

Students in Classics must choose one of the following options. Each 
option requires an additional 12 hours of approved supporting course 
work which may be drawn from a wide range of fields and disciplines. 
Students must plan their programs in consultation with a departmen- 
tal adviser. 

Classical Archaeology Option 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

30 Classical Civilization courses of which at least 20 hours must 

be chosen from the following list: 

CLCIV 131 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Greece 

CLCIV 132 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Rome 
and Italy 

CLCIV 217— Greek Art 

CLCIV 218— Roman Art 

CLCIV 231— The Development of the Ancient City 

CLCIV 232— Ancient Greek Sanctuaries 

CLCIV 240 — Sex and Gender in Classical Antiquity 

CLCIV 318— Etruscan and Italic Art 

CLCIV 343— The Archaeology of Greece 

CLCIV 344— The Archaeology of Italy 

CLCIV 391 — Topics in Classical Archaeology and 
Civilization 
12 Supporting courses selected with the approval of the adviser 

Classical Civilization Option 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

30 Classical Civilization courses at the level of 114 and above 

12 Supporting courses selected with the approval of the adviser 



Classics Option 



HOURS 

36 



12 



REQUIREMENTS 

Greek and Latin courses 1 including the following 

LAT 311 — Intermediate Prose Composition 

GRK 311 — Greek Prose Composition 
6 additional hours at the 300 level in each language 
Supporting courses selected with the approval of the adviser 



1. Only 4 hours at the 100-level may be counted. 
Greek Option 



HOURS 

24 



12 



REQUIREMENTS 

Greek courses (excluding GRK 101), including GRK 311 and 9 

additional hours at the 300 level 

Select from the following: 

CLCIV 114— Introduction to Greek Culture 

CLCIV 131 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Greece 

CLCIV 217— Greek Art 

CLCIV 232— Ancient Greek Sanctuaries 

CLCIV 343 — The Archaeology of Greece 

CLCIV 390— Topics in Classical Literature 1 

CLCIV 391 — Topics in Classical Archaeology and 
Civilization 1 
Supporting courses selected with the approval of the adviser 



1. CLCIV 390 and 391 apply only when offered on Greek topics. 

Latin Option 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

24 Latin courses (excluding LAT 101, 102, and 105), including 

LAT 311 and 9 additional hours at the 300 level 
6 Select from the following: 

CLCIV 116 — The Roman Achievement 

CLCIV 132 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Rome 

and Italy 
CLCIV 218— Roman Art 
CLCIV 318— Etruscan and Italic Art 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



134 



12 



CLCIV 344 — The Archaeology of Italy 
CLCIV 390 — Topics in Classical Literature 1 
CLCIV 391 — Topics in Classical Archaeology and 
Civilization' 
Supporting courses selected with the approval of the adviser 



1. CLCIV 390 and 391 applv only when offered on Latin/Roman topics. 

For All Options: 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300 or approved 200) courses in the 
major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 

NOTE: Majors choosing the Classical Civilization and Classical Archaeology options 
are advised, but not required, to satisfy the college foreign language requirement with 
one of the classical languages. 

CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

An option in Classical Archaeology is sponsored by the Department 
of the Classics. See Classics. 

MINOR IN CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

This minor is sponsored by the Department of the Classics. See also 
Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin. 

E-mail: classics@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CLASS.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

18 Classical Archaeology courses of which at least 6 hours must 

be at the 300 level. Select from the following: 

CLCIV 131 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Greece 

CLCIV 132 — Introduction to Classical Archaeology: Rome 
and Italy 

CLCIV 217— Greek Art 

CLCIV 218— Roman Art 

CLCIV 231— The Development of the Ancient City 

CLCIV 232— Ancient Greek Sanctuaries 

CLCIV 318— Etruscan and Italic Art 

CLCIV 343— The Archaeology of Greece 

CLCIV 344— The Archaeology of Italy 

CLCIV 391— Topics in Classical Archaeology and 
Civilization: Seminar and Tutorial 
18 Total 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

An option in Classical Civilization is sponsored by the Department of 
the Classics. See Classics. 

MINOR IN CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

This minor is sponsored by the Department of the Classics. See also 
minors in Classical Archaeology, Greek, and Latin. 

E-mail: classics@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CLASS.html 



HOURS 
18 



18 



REQUIREMENTS 

Classical Civilization courses, including: 
6 hours maximum of 100-level courses 
6 hours minimum advanced-level courses 

Total 



COMMERCEILAS 



See combined degree programs. 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



A student who elects comparative literature as a major must complete 
48 semester hours in the courses indicated below, including at least 12 
hours in courses numbered 300 or above. Besides knowing English, 



the student must have sufficient linguistic skill in at least one foreign 
language to participate in 200- and 300- level literature courses offered 
by the various foreign language and literature departments. 

As soon as a student contemplates choosing comparative litera- 
ture as a major, the faculty adviser should be consulted. The adviser 
will assist the student in selecting appropriate courses that will be 
especially helpful as preparation for the advanced comparative litera- 
ture training beginning with the junior year. Courses in classical 
civilization and in literature (particularly courses dealing with works 
from several countries) are especially recommended at relatively 
early stages of study. An ample selection of such courses at the 100- 
and 200-ievels exists in the various literature departments. 

The distribution of course work allows for considerable flexibility. 
The major is administered by the Program in Comparative Literature. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: comlit@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_C_LIT.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work equates to 48 
hours with at least 15 hours of Comparative Literature courses. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction. To be eligible for distinction, a student must 
have at least a 3.25 cumulative grade point average and a 3.75 
grade point average in departmental courses, complete a senior 
thesis (C LIT 293), and receive the approval of the departmental 
honors committee. The departmental honors committee will de- 
termine the level of distinction to be awarded. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

15 Comparative Literature Courses (minimum of 15 hours 

required): 

C LIT 201— Comparative Literary Studies, I and C LIT 

202 — Literature and Ideas 
The remaining hours should be selected from different 
types of courses (e.g., C LIT 141, 142, 189, 190, 341, 361, 
371). 
15 One Literature in the Original Language (minimum of 15 

hours required): 

Ancient or modern (including Far Eastern and African) 12 
hours of which are at the 200-level or above, studied in 
depth and in its historical development. (Normally this 
is the primary literature of the student's educational 
background.) 
9 Second Literature in the Original Language (minimum of 9 

hours required): 

200-level or above courses in a second literature in the 
original language. With the assistance of the adviser, 
these courses should be carefully chosen so as to 
correlate meaningfully with the student's primary 
literature. A student may center his or her interest on a 
cultural period such as medieval, Renaissance, neo- 
classical and enlightenment, or modern (nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries), or on genres, relations, or 
critical theory. 1 
9 Single National Literature (minimum of 9 hours required) or 

several national literatures, including comparative literature; 
or in other humanistic fields, such as history, philosophy, 
speech, art, music, psychology, sociology, theatre, 
anthropology, and Asian studies. Because some of the courses 
in these subjects are more suitable than others to balance a 
student's individual major in comparative literature, the 
student must follow the guidelines set by his or her adviser, 
variable Western Civilization. 2 Select from: 

C LIT 141 and C LIT 142 (6 hours) or either HIST 110 or 111 
and HIST 112 or 113 (6-8 hours) 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- or approved 200-level) courses in 
the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 



1. If one of the literatures studied is English, a student who continues in a graduate 
program in comparative literature will be required to acquire a reading knowledge of 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



135 



a second foreign language (i.e., one foreign language for the B.A., two foreign 
languages for the M.A., three foreign languages for the Ph.D.). 
2. These sequences may be used to satisfy the requirements, respectively, of 
comparative or national literature courses (see above). Beginning students in 
comparative literature are strongly urged to take the C LIT 141-142 sequence. 

MINOR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

This minor is sponsored by the Program in Comparative Literature. 
Students must choose from either the Western or the non-Western 
track. 

E-mail: comlit@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CLASS.html 

Western Track 



HOURS 

6 



18 



REQUIREMENTS 

C LIT 141— Masterpieces of Western Culture, I; and C LIT 

142 — Masterpieces of Western Culture, II 

C LIT 201— Comparative Literary Studies, I; and C LIT 202— 

Literature and Ideas 

Select two courses from the following list: 

C LIT 361 — International Literary Genres and Forms 
C LIT 371 — International Literary Relations 
C LIT 396 — Special Topics in Comparative Literature 
Other advanced courses approved by the undergraduate 
comparative literature adviser. 

Total 



Non-Western Track 



HOURS 

6 



18 



REQUIREMENTS 

C LIT 189 — Classical Masterpieces of Non-Western Cultures, 

and C LIT 190 — Modern Masterpieces of Non-Western 

Cultures 

C LIT 201— Comparative Literary Studies, I; and C LIT 202— 

Literature and Ideas 

Two courses chosen from the following list: 

C LIT 341 — Themes and Types in Western and Non-Western 

Narratives 

C LIT 361 — International Literary Genres and Forms 
C LIT 371 — International Literary Relations 
C LIT 396 — Special Topics in Comparative Literature 
Other advanced courses approved by the undergraduate 
Comparative Literature adviser. 

Total 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 



See also the major in Mathematics and Computer Science, and Statis- 
tics and Computer Science. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This program offers training for teaching computer science in the 
schools. 

E-mail: academic@cs.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CS.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Computer Science 

Minimum required course work normally equates to 63-67 hours 

General education: See the description of the general education re- 
quirements. Note that students in this curriculum satisfy the 
mathematics requirement by the requirements of the major. Stu- 
dents may need additional hours in humanities to complete the 15- 
hour minimum required for certification. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours. 

Additional requirements: It is required that a student electing the 
computer science teacher education major also elect an approved 
teaching minor. Students are advised that additional course work 
is necessary to teach middle grades six through eight. Consult the 
certification officer in 130 Education Building for additional infor- 
mation. 

Departmental distinction: Students interested in attaining depart- 
mental distinction should consult with the honors adviser for 
program requirements early in the junior year. 

HOURS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

3 C & I 301 — Introduction to Teaching in a Diverse Society 

3 C & I 302— Teaching Diverse Middle Grade Students 



3 
4 

3 
3 

5-8 
24-27 

HOURS 

10-11 

19 



6 
4 
39-40 



C & I 303 — Teaching Diverse Senior High School Students 

C & I 304 — Teaching and Assessing Secondary School 

Students 

EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

ED PR 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 

Total 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Calculus and analytic geometry through MATH 242, 243, or 

245 

Computer Science 

C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

C S 173 — Discrete Mathematical Structures 

C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

C S 231— Computer Architecture, I 

C S 232— Computer Architecture, II 

C S 273 — Introduction to Theory of Computation 

300-level Computer Science electives 1 

C S 317 — Computer-Assisted Instruction 

Total 



1 . Sample list of suitable computer science electives: programming — C S311,318,321, 
322, 323, 324, 326, 327, 328; logic design and computer architecture— C S 331, 333, 337, 
338, 339, 362; numerical analysis— C S 257, 350, 355, 358, 359; theory— C S 313, 373, 375; 
hardware— C S 335, 384; general— C S 397. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This minor is sponsored by the Department of Computer Science. 

E-mail: academic@cs.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CS.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

4 C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 

2 C S 173— Discrete Mathematical Structures 

4 C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 

3 At least one additional course chosen from: 

C S 231 — Computer Architecture, I (logic design) 
C S 232 — Computer Architecture, II (machine level 

programming) 
C S 257— Numerical Methods 
C S 273 — Introduction to Theory of Computation 
C S 348 — Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 
3 At least one 300-level course, select from: 

Software 

C S 321 — Programming Languages and Compilers 
C S 323 — Operating Systems Design 

Architecture 

C S 331 — Embedded Systems Architectures 
C S 333 — Computer System Organization 

Hardware 

C S 335— Introduction to VLSI System Design 

C S 337— VLSI System and Logic Design 

C S 384 — Computer Data Acquisition Systems 

Artificial Intelligence 

C S 341 — Mechanized Mathematical Inferences 
C S 342 — Computer Inference and Knowledge Acquisition 
C S 346 — Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning 
C S 347 — Knowledge-Based Programming 

Numerical Analysis 

C S 355 — Numerical Methods for Partial Differential 

Equations 
C S 358 — Numerical Linear Algebra 
C S 359 — Numerical Approximation and Ordinary 
Differential Equations 

Theory 

C S 373 — Combinatorial Algorithms 
C S 375 — Automata, Formal Languages, and 
Computational Complexity 
3 Another 200- or 300-level course, chosen either from the lists 

above or from these additional courses: 
C S 311— Database Systems 
C S 318— Computer Graphics 
C S 326 — Compiler Construction 
C S 327 — Software Engineering 

C S 328 — Computer Networks and Distributed Systems 
C S 338 — Communication Networks for Computers 
C S 339 — Computer-Aided Design for Digital Systems 
C S 362— Logic Design 
19 Total 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



136 



At least two courses (6 hours) of this minor must meet the LAS 
Advanced Hours requirement. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. Students 
taking this minor will be enrolled in one of the teacher education 
programs and will meet the general education requirements of that 
program. 

E-mail: academic@cs.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_CS.html 



HOURS 

4 
2 

4 
3 



19 



REQUIREMENTS 

C S 125 — Introduction to Computer Science 
C S 173 — Discrete Mathematical Structures 
C S 225 — Data Structures and Software Principles 
One 200-level course, choose from: 

C S 231 — Computer Architecture, I 

C S 257— Numerical Methods 

C S 273— Introduction to Theory of Computation 
Two additional 200- or 300-level courses, to be selected in 
consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Programs in 
the Computer Science Department 
Total 



NOTE: Completion of this minor does not result in certification to teach computer 
science in the state of Illinois. However, students who complete this minor will be 
eligible to teach computer science in the public schools upon satisfaction of additional 
requirements. For additional information about certification, contact the certification 
officer of the Council on Teacher Education. Students will need 32 hours of computer 
science to be certified in this area. 

DENTISTRY 

Academic advising for the pre-professional program in Dentistry is 
offered through the General Curriculum Office. See Pre-Professional 
Programs. 

EARTH SCIENCE 

A major in Earth Science Teaching is offered through the Department 
of Geology. See Geology. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN EARTH SCIENCE 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. Geology 
electives totaling 7-8 hours are to be chosen in consultation with an 
adviser. An attempt should be made to obtain as much breadth as 
possible as a prospective earth science teacher. 

E-mail: altaner@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_GEOL.html 



HOURS 

3-6 
3-4 



7-8 



25-30 



REQUIREMENTS 
ASTR 121 and 122; or 210; or 300 
ATMOS 100 or GEOG 102 
GEOL 107 and 108 1 — General Geology, I and II 
GEOL 233— Earth Materials and the Environment, or GEOL 
332 

Geology Electives: Chosen from Geology 143, 280, and 300- 
level courses (Geology 301, 311, 320, 352, 370 are 
recommended). 
Total 



Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach 
middle grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 
Education Building for additional information. 



1. Geology 107-108 are intended for science majors and are the preferred courses. 
Students entering this minor after taking GEOL 100, 101, 104, or 1 1 1 should take GEOL 
108 and 110. Students enteringaftertakingGEOL102shouldtakeGEOL 107. Students 
not taking the GEOL 107 field trip are required to take GEOL 110. 



EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 

The goal of this major is that the student gain an introductory knowl- 
edge of the civilizations of East Asia, competence in an East Asian 
language, familiarity with East Asian cultures through the disciplines 
of history and literature, and a more advanced knowledge of the 
region including research and writing in a seminar format. The major 
and minor, administered by the Department of East Asian Languages 
and Cultures, are useful for the student seeking a broad liberal arts 
education and preparation for graduate or professional study involv- 
ing East Asia. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: ealc@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_EALC.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 50-54 hours. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

26-30 Language students must have the following hours in the 

respective language by the end of the third year: 

30 Chinese 

30 Japanese 

26 Korean 

12 Disciplinary and period courses: 1-2 

EALC 170 — East Asian Civilizations: China, Japan, Korea 
One course on East Asia dealing substantially with the 

period before 1800 
One course in East Asian history 
One course in East Asian literature 
12 Advanced courses: 2 

EALC 298 — Colloquium in East Asian Languages and 

Cultures 
Three additional non-language courses at the advanced 
(300) level 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300 or approved 200) courses in the 
major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 



1. At least two of the four disciplinary and period courses must be at 200-level or 
above. 

2. No course may be counted more than once toward the disciplinary and period 
courses and advanced courses in the major. 

MINOR IN EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES 

E-mail: ealc@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_EALC.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

5 Select one from the following: 

CHIN 104— Intermediate Chinese, II 

JAPAN 104 — Intermediate Japanese, II 

KOREA 104 — Intermediate Korean, II 
15 Non-language courses as follows: 

3 EALC 170 — East Asian Civilizations; China, Japan, 

Korea 

12 Additional hours of East Asia-related courses (at 
least 6 of these hours must be at the 300 level) 
20 Total 

Note: Completion of CHIN, JAPAN, or KOREA 104 satisfies the LAS foreign language 
requirement. 

ECOLOGY, ETHOLOGY, AND EVOLUTION 

An option in Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution is sponsored by the 
School of Life Sciences. See Life Sciences. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



137 



ECONOMICS 



Economics is a social science that studies the problems caused by 
scarcity and how individuals, institutions, and societies may deal with 
these problems. Economics shares common interests with business- 
oriented disciplines such as finance and business administration. 
Economists frequently require quantitative skills, such as calculus 
and statistics, to derive economic principles that are useful in forming 
policies designed to solve economic problems. 

The major in economics requires course work in three areas. For 
further information, see the Economics Bulletin available in the office 
of undergraduate studies of the Department of Economics which 
administers this major. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: econ@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ECON.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 55-56 hours including a minimum of 24 hours of 
economics courses excluding ECON 172, 173, 199, 295, and 299. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: A student must have a grade point average 
of at least 3.25 overall and at least 3.5 in economics; complete a 
research project (e.g., complete ECON 299); and be recommended 
by the faculty research adviser. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

Economics and Statistics 
6 ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles, and ECON 103— 

Macroeconomic Principles 
6 ECON 172— Economic Statistics, I and ECON 173— Economic 

Statistics, II; or equivalent 
18 Additional economics 1 including: 

ECON 300 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory and ECON 
301 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory 
7-8 Mathematics, choose from: 

MATH 125 — Elementary Linear Algebra with 

Applications, and MATH 134 — Calculus for Social 
Scientists or Math 120 and 130; or equivalent (see 
Economics Bulletin). Additional mathematics courses 
are recommended. 
18 Supporting course work. 18 hours of courses outside 

economics but related to the student's major interest in 
economics (see Economics Bulletin for details and examples). 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 



1. Excluding ECON 199 and 299. 
ENGINEERINGILAS 



See Combined Degree Programs. 
ENGLISH 



The Department of English sponsors two options. The English Option 
is organized to provide instruction in literature in English, literary 
theory and criticism, the English language, expository and creative 
writing, writing studies, English education, film, cultural studies, and 
closely related fields. Students who major in English have many 
choices in planning a field of study, but the basic program is designed 
to accommodate students who seek to broaden their familiarity with 
our literature, to intensify their language skills for personal and 
professional reasons, and to learn more about literature's relationship 
to the other arts, history, philosophy, psychology, and the modern 
languages. 



The English Teaching Option leads to certification to teach in 
Secondary School. Students must select one option. The department 
also offers a major in Rhetoric with options in creative writing and 
professional writing, a teacher education minor in Rhetoric, and a 
teacher education minor in English which is described below. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

Students must select one option. 

English Option 

E-mail: english@english.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ENGL.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 54-58 hours including a minimum of 30 hours of English 
courses. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: A student interested in graduating with 
distinction or high distinction must enter the honors program with 
at least a 3.25 grade point average, complete three honors semi- 
nars, and write a senior honors essay. To be considered for highest 
distinction, a student must take an additional 3 hours and com- 
plete a senior honors thesis. The level of distinction is assigned by 
the honors committee on the basis of grade point average, work in 
English courses and in honors seminars, and the readers' evalua- 
tions of the honors essay or honors thesis. Interested students 
should consult the departmental honors adviser for details. 



HOURS 

3 



REQUIREMENTS 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Poetry (It is strongly 
recommended that this course and the following three 
surveys be taken prior to advanced courses in the major.) 
Three survey courses: 

ENGL 209— English Literature from the Beginning to 1798 
ENGL 210— English Literature from 1798 to Present 
ENGL 255 — Survey of American Literature, I 
300-level Shakespeare course 

Select one course from each of the following five groups. No 
single course can be used to fulfill the requirement of more 
than one group, and at least 12 hours must be at the 300-level. 
NOTE: ENGL 300— Writing About Literature is a 
required course and satisfies the University 
Composition II requirement for English majors 
(depending on the topic). ENGL 300 will be counted 
toward fulfilling either the 300-level Shakespeare 
requirement or one group requirement. English 
Honors students who complete ENGL 291 (English 
Honors Independent Study) are exempted from the 
requirement for English 300. 
GROUP I (British literature to 1800): 

ENGL 202— Medieval Literature and Culture 
ENGL 204 — Renaissance Literature and Culture 
ENGL 206 — Literature and Culture of the Enlightenment 
ENGL 315 — Poetry and Prose of the English Renaissance, 

1500-1600 
ENGL 316 — The Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries 
ENGL 321 — Poetry and Prose from the Metaphysicals to 

1660 
ENGL 326 — Literature of the Restoration and Early 

Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 327— Literature of the Later Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 328 — English Drama of the Restoration and 

Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 329 — Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Fiction 
GROUP II (British literature after 1800): 

ENGL 207 — Literature and Culture of the Romantic Period 

ENGL 208 — Victorian Literature and Culture 

ENGL 247— The British Novel 

ENGL 331 — English Romantic Literature 

ENGL 334 — Victorian Poetry and Nonfiction Prose 

ENGL 335— Nineteenth-Century British Fiction 

ENGL 341 — British Literature in the Twentieth Century to 

1930 
ENGL 342— British Literature in the Twentieth Century 
Since 1930 
GROUP III (American literature): 

ENGL 250— The American Novel to 1914 
ENGL 251— The American Novel Since 1914 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



138 



ENGL 256 — Survey of American Literature, II 

ENGL 259 — Afro-American Literature, I 

ENGL 260 — Afro-American Literature, II 

ENGL 349— American Literature, 1820-1865 

ENGL 350— American Literature, 1865-1914 

ENGL 351— American Modernist Literature, 1914-1945 

ENGL 352 — American Contemporary Literature, 1945- 

Present 
ENGL 360 — The Literature of American Ethnic and Racial 
Minorities 
3 Group IV (major author other than Shakespeare): 

ENGL 311— Chaucer 
ENGL 323— Milton 

ENGL 343— The Plays of Bernard Shaw 
ENGL 355 — Major Authors 
3-4 Group V (theme, mode, genre, and interdisciplinary 

approaches): 

ENGL 213— The Culture of Modernism 

ENGL 215 — Practical Criticism 

ENGL 241 — The Beginnings of Modern Poetry 

ENGL 242— Poetry Since 1940 

ENGL 243 — Development of the Modern Drama 

ENGL 244 — Development of the Modern Drama 

ENGL 247— The British Novel 

ENGL 248 — Modern British and American Fiction in 

Relation to Continental Fiction 
ENGL 250— The American Novel to 1914 
ENGL 251— The American Novel Since 1914 
ENGL 272 — Minority Images in United States Film 
ENGL 273 — Intermediate Film Studies: Directors, Genres, 

Themes 
ENGL 274 — Literature and Society 
ENGL 275 — Literature and Psychology 
ENGL 280— Women Writers 
ENGL 281 — Women in the Literary Imagination 
ENGL 284 — Modern Jewish Literature 
ENGL 285 — Postcolonial Literatures in English 
ENGL 303 — Historical Introduction to the English 

Language 
ENGL 361 — Topics in English and American Literature 
ENGL 362 — Topics in Modem Fiction 
ENGL 365— Comedy 
ENGL 366 — Topics in Modern Drama 
ENGL 373 — Special Topics in Film Studies 
ENGL 375 — Topics in the Relation of Other Disciplines to 

the Study of Literature 
ENGL 383 — Literary Criticism from 1800 to the Present 
6 Select from: 

C LIT 141 and C LIT 142 (6 hours) or HIST 111 and HIST 
112 or HIST 231 and 232 
18-21 Select from one of the following options, with the approval of 

the English adviser: 
18-21 hrs An official minor in another department or unit, 
or 20 additional hours in another department, 
chosen in consultation with an adviser, 
or 
20 hrs Courses from two or more fields and combined into 
an intellectually or professionally coherent study. 
At least 6 hours of advanced (300-level or designated 
200-level) courses are required. Up to 6 hours in 
English or cross-listed in English, Rhetoric, or B&T 
W and not counted toward major requirements may 
be approved for a topically organized study. 
Possibilities for topical studies include prelaw, 
premedicine, precommerce, business 
communications, marketing, publishing, medieval 
studies, and other cross-disciplinary topics. 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 

NOTE: Students planning to enter graduate school should elect as many 300-level 
courses as possible, including a course in either Chaucer or Milton; a course in the 
history or structure of the English language; and a course in critical theory. Further, 
these students should consult the specific requirements of the graduate schools they 
plan to enter. 



English Teaching Option 

This option is designed for students preparing to teach English at the 
secondary level. 

E-mail: english@english.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ENGL.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 45-46 hours 

General education: Refer to the description of the general education 
requirements. Students in this major satisfy the 15-hour humani- 
ties requirement by the requirements of the major. The Composi- 
tion II requirement is satisfied by English 300+ . 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: Distinction will be awarded on the basis of 
grade point average and satisfactory completion of honors, indi- 
vidual study, and honors thesis courses. See the English adviser for 
a detailed statement of the requirements. 

Prerequisites to transfer to the Teaching Option. In addition to EDPSY 
211 and EPS 201, students must also complete ENGL 101 and at 
least six hours from ENGL 209, 210, 255, or 256 prior to transfer into 
the Teaching Option. 

In addition to the requirements for the option listed below, students 
must complete the Teacher Education Minor in Secondary School 
Teaching (36 hours). Conferral of the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to completion of the minor requires 
approval by petition to the LAS Student Affairs Office. While it is 
possible to complete this program in 8 semesters, many students 
may require an extra semester or two. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

3 ENGL 101— Introduction to Poetry 

3 ENGL 209— English Literature from the Beginning to 1798 

3 ENGL 210— English Literature from 1798 to Present 

3 ENGL 255 — Survey of American Literature, I 

3 ENGL 256 — Survey of American Literature, II 

3 Select one from the following Shakespeare courses 1 

ENGL 118 — Introduction to Shakespeare 
ENGL 300+ —Writing About Literature 
ENGL 318— Shakespeare, I 
ENGL 319— Shakespeare, II 
3 One additional course in English literature. Select from: 12 

ENGL 202— Medieval Literature and Culture 
ENGL 204 — Renaissance Literature and Culture 
ENGL 206 — Literature and Culture of the Enlightenment 
ENGL 207— Literature and Culture of the Romantic Period 
ENGL 208 — Victorian Literature and Culture 
ENGL 247— The British Novel 
ENGL 300+ —Writing About Literature 
ENGL 315 — Poetry and Prose of the English Renaissance, 

1500-1600 
ENGL 316 — The Drama of Shakespeare's Contemporaries 
ENGL 321 — Poetry and Prose from the Metaphysicals to 

1660 
ENGL 326 — Literature of the Restoration and Early 

Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 327— Literature of the Later Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 328 — English Drama of the Restoration and 

Eighteenth Century 
ENGL 329 — Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Fiction 
ENGL 331 — English Romantic Literature 
ENGL 334 — Victorian Poetry and Nonfiction Prose 
ENGL 335 — Nineteenth-Century British Fiction 
ENGL 341— British Literature in the Twentieth Century to 

1930 
ENGL 342— British Literature in the Twentieth Century 
Since 1930 
3 One additional course in American literature 12 

ENGL 250— The American Novel to 1914 
ENGL 251— The American Novel Since 1914 
ENGL 259 — Afro- American Literature, I 
ENGL 260 — Afro-American Literature, II 
ENGL 300+ —Writing About Literature 
ENGL 349— American Literature, 1820 - 1865 
ENGL 350— American Literature, 1865 - 1914 
ENGL 351— American Modernist Literature, 1914 - 1945 
ENGL 352 — American Contemporary Literature, 1945 to 
the Present 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



139 



ENGL 360 — The Literature of American Ethnic and Racial 

Minorities 
3 One course in a major author other than Shakespeare 1 ' 2 

ENGL 300+ —Writing About Literature 
ENGL 311— Chaucer 
ENGL 323— Milton 

ENGL 343— The Plays of Bernard Shaw 
ENGL 355— Major Authors 
3-4 One course in theme/mode/genre/interdisciplinary 

approaches 1 ' 2 

ENGL 213— The Culture of Modernism 

ENGL 215— Practical Criticism 

ENGL 241 — The Beginnings of Modem Poetry 

ENGL 242— Poetry Since 1940 

ENGL 243 — Development of the Modern Drama 

ENGL 244 — Development of the Modern Drama 

ENGL 247— The British Novel 

ENGL 248 — Modem British and American Fiction in 

Relation to Continental Fiction 
ENGL 250— The American Novel to 1914 
ENGL 251— The American Novel Since 1914 
ENGL 272— Minority Images in United States Film 
ENGL 273 — Intermediate Film Studies: Directors, Genres, 

Themes 
ENGL 274— Literature and Society 
ENGL 275 — Literature and Psychology 
ENGL 280— Women Writers 
ENGL 281 — Women in the Literary Imagination 
ENGL 284 — Modern Jewish Literature 
ENGL 285 — Postcolonial Literatures in English 
ENGL 303 — Historical Introduction to the English 

Language 
ENGL 361 — Topics in English and American Literature 
ENGL 362 — Topics in Modern Fiction 
ENGL 365— Comedy 
ENGL 366 — Topics in Modern Drama 
ENGL 373 — Special Topics in Film Studies 
ENGL 375 — Topics in the Relation of Other Disciplines to 

the Study of Literature 
ENGL 383— Literary Criticism from 1800 to the Present 
3 ENGL 302— Descriptive English Grammar 

3 ENGL 381— Theory and Practice of Written Composition 

3 Select one course from the following: 

ENGL 301— Introduction to the Study of the English 

Language 
ENGL 303 — Historical Introduction to the English 

Language 
ENGL 382— Writing Technologies 
6 One sequence in Western culture. Select from: 

C LIT 141— Masterpieces of Western Culture, I and C LIT 

142 — Masterpieces of Western Culture, II 
or 

HIST 111— Western Civilization from Antiquity to 1660 

and HIST 112— Western Civilization from 1660 to the 

Present 
or 

HIST 231— British Isles to 1688 and HIST 232— The 

History of Great Britain Since 1688 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 

Students must maintain a 2.5 grade point to remain in good standing. 

1 . ENGL 300+ must be used to fulfill one of these requirements even if the student has 
taken another course that satisfies the COMP II requirement. Only English Honors 
students who complete ENGL 291 (English Honors Independent Study) are exempted 
from the requirement for English 300. 

2. One of the requirements in these groups must be selected in African-American, 
American ethnic minority, or women's literature. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 1 

E-mail: english@english.uiuc.edu 
Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ENGL.hrml 



HOURS 

6 



6 
3 
21 



REQUIREMENTS 

ENGL 101 — Introduction to Poetry, and no more than one 

other 100-level literature course. It is strongly recommended 

that 101 be taken prior to any advanced courses in the minor. 

One 200-level course in British literature before 1800 (ENGL 

202, 204, 206, 209), or ENGL 118— Introduction to 

Shakespeare 2 

One 200-level course in British or American literature after 

1800. 2 Select from: 

ENGL 207— Literature and Culture of the Romantic Period 
ENGL 208— Victorian Literature and Culture 
ENGL 210— English Literature from the Beginning to 1798 
ENGL 213— The Culture of Modernism 
ENGL 241 — The Beginnings of Modem Poetry 
ENGL 242— Poetry Since 1940 
ENGL 243 — Development of the Modern Drama 
ENGL 244 — Development of the Modem Drama 
ENGL 247— The British Novel 
ENGL 250— The American Novel to 1914 
ENGL 251— The American Novel Since 1914 
ENGL 256 — Survey of American Literature, II 
ENGL 259 — Afro-American Literature, I 
ENGL 260 — Afro-American Literature, II 
Minimum of six hours of 300-level work 
English course selected in consultation with adviser 
Total 



1. Six hours of advanced rhetoric courses (numbered 140 or above) may be included 
in the above minor. 

2. With the written permission of the English honors adviser, English honors seminars 
may be substituted for these listed courses, when such seminars are available, open to 
non-majors, and appropriate. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. 

E-mail: english@english.uiuc.edu 
Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_ENGL.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

4 RHET 105— Principles of Composition, or RHET 108— Forms 

of Composition 
6 Two courses in English literature (ENGL 209 — English 

Literature from the Beginning to 1789, and ENGL 210 — 

English Literature from 1798 to Present are strongly 

recommended) 
6 Two courses in American literature (ENGL 255 and 256 — 

Survey of American Literature, I and II are strongly 

recommended) 
3 ENGL 302— Descriptive English Grammar 

3 ENGL 381 — Theory and Practice of Written Composition, or 

RHET 133— Principles of Composition, or RHET 143 — 

Expository Writing (ENGL 381 is strongly recommended) 
6 Electives in English or American literature (ENGL 215 — 

Practical Criticism is strongly recommended) 
28 Total 

Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach 
middle grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 
Education Building for additional information. 

ENGLISH AS AN INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE 



MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 

This minor, sponsored by the Division of English as an International 
Language, is for students who wish to prepare to teach English 
overseas or in any context other than the public schools. 

E-mail: deil@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_esl.html 



HOURS 

3 
3 



REQUIREMENTS 

E I L 302 — Descriptive English Grammar for ESL Teachers 

E I L 388 — English Phonology and Morphology for ESL 

Teachers 

E I L 389 — Theoretical Foundations of Second Language 

Acquisition 

LING 200 — Introduction to Language Science 

LING 225 — Elements of Psycholinguistics 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



140 



21 



Two courses from those in groups A, B, or C. No more than 

one course mav be taken from each group. 

GROUP A: 

E I L 350 — Introduction to Sociolinguistics 

E I L 356 — Impact of Cultural Differences in TESL 

GROUP B: 

E I L 311— ESL Methods and Materials 

GROUP C: 

E I L 360 — Principles of Language Testing 
E I L 367 — Communicative Approaches to Second and 
Foreign Language Teaching 

Total 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND 
LANGUAGE 

For those in another teacher education curriculum who want to 
prepare themselves to gain an ESL approval on their teacher's certifi- 
cate related to their major field. Teacher education minors are avail- 
able only to students seeking to add additional teaching fields to their 
teaching majors. 

E-mail: deil@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_esl.html 



HOURS 

2 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 



3 
23 



REQUIREMENTS 

E I L 214— ESL in Elementary School or E I L 215— ESL in the 

Secondary School 

E I L 302 — Descriptive English Grammar for ESL Teachers 

E I L 311— ESL Methods and Materials 

E I L 356 — Impact of Cultural Differences in TESL, or C & I 

346 — Culture in the Classroom 

E I L 360 — Principles of Languages Testing 

E I L 388 — English Phonology and Morphology for ESL 

Teachers 

E I L 389 — Theoretical Foundations of Second Language 

Acquisition 

LING 200 — Introduction to Language Science 

Total 



ENTOMOLOGY 



An option in Entomology is sponsored by the School of Life Sciences. 
See Life Sciences. 



ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 



The Department of Geography sponsors The Physical Environment 
(the Earth's Land and Biota) Option. See Geography. The Specialized 
Curriculum in Geology and Geophysics administered by the Depart- 
ment of Geology sponsors the Environmental Geology Option. See 
Geology. 



FINANCE 



The field of finance is concerned with the acquisition of funds and the 
determination of the use of funds by a business or an individual. In this 
process, an important aspect is the valuation of assets, both financial 
and real. Specific areas of finance include the acquisition and use of 
funds by businesses (business finance), the valuation of financial 
assets (investments), the financial environment and participants (bank- 
ing and financial institutions), the valuation and financing of real 
properties (real estate), and an assessment of risks and programs to 
insure against risk (insurance and risk management). The major is 
administered by the Department of Finance. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: finance@cba.uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_fin.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work equates to 43 
hours with at least 15 hours in Finance courses. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction: Departmental distinction will be awarded 
on the basis of grade point average. See the Department for details. 



HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

15 Finance courses including: 

FIN 254 — Corporate Finance and FIN 300 — Financial 
Markets plus three additional finance courses except 
for Finance 199. Current recommendations of courses 
in each program area within finance are available in 
the department office. 
6 ACCY 201— Accounting and Accountancy, I and ACCY 202— 

Accounting and Accountancy, II 
4 MATH 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists, I; or equivalent 

3 C S 105— Introduction to Computing with Application to 

Business and Commerce 
6 ECON 102— Microeconomic Principles and ECON 103— 

Macroeconomic Principles 
3 ECON 172— Economic Statistics, I 

3 ECON 173— Economic Statistics, II 

3 Choose at least 3 hours from the following courses. Current 

recommendations of courses in each program area within 
finance are available in the department office. Additional 
courses may be substituted upon the approval of a finance 
adviser. 

ACCY 301, ACCY 302, ACCY 303, ACCY 304, ACCY 310, 

ACCY 312 
B ADM 200, B ADM 202, B ADM 210, B ADM 261, B ADM 

274, B ADM 321 
Economics (any course numbered above ECON 103, 

excluding ECON 172 and 173) 
GEOG 366, GEOG 383 

Mathematics (any course numbered higher than MATH 
120, excluding MATH 134) 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 

NOTES: 

— FIN 254 has as a prerequisite credit or concurrent registration in ACCY 202 and 

ECON 173. Therefore, ACCY 201-202 and ECON 172-173 should be taken in the 

sophomore year. 

—ECON 102 and 103, C S 105, and MATH 134 should be taken in the freshman year. 

— Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in their major to graduate. This includes both the 

finance and the supporting courses taken to fulfill graduation requirements. None of 

these courses may be taken on a credit-no credit basis. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

See also specific languages. 

CURRICULA PREPARATORY TO TEACHING FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers curricula for the 
preparation of teachers of French, German, Latin, Russian, and Span- 
ish. Teacher education minors are also available in these languages 
and in Italian and Portuguese. Students are advised that additional 
course work is necessary to teach middle grades six through eight. A 
student who wishes to prepare for teaching a foreign language at the 
elementary and secondary school levels should consult the certifica- 
tion officer at the Council on Teacher Education, 130 Education 
Building, for information concerning current state requirements and 
procedures. 

E-mail: flte@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_F_L.html 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

See the secondary education adviser for teacher education general 
education requirements. 

HOURS PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

3 HUMAN 279 — Introduction to Foreign Language Education 

2 C & I 229 — Field Experience in Secondary Education 

2 C & 1 240— Secondary Education in the United States 

3 EPS 201 — Foundations of American Education 

2 Parateaching 1 

3 EDPSY 211— Educational Psychology 

1 SP ED 218 — Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



141 



24 



ED PR 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 
Total 



1. The student is required to complete FR 270, GER 270, LAT 270, RUSS 270, or SPAN 
270, depending on his or her major. 

FRENCH 

This major is administered by the Department of French, which also 
sponsors a Year Abroad Program. See the Special Programs section. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: french@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_FR.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 63-68 hours beyond the 100 level plus the Western 
Civilization requirement 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction. A student must have at least a 3.5 cumula- 
tive grade point average, complete a senior thesis (FR 292), and 
complete two additional advanced-level courses in French or in 
supporting course work. Consult the honors adviser for details. 

Select an option in consultation with your adviser. 
French Studies Option 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
12 

12 



12-15 



6-8 



REQUIREMENTS 

FR 205 — Oral French, I or equivalent 

FR 207 — Grammar and Composition or equivalent 

FR 209 — Introduction to French Literature, I or equivalent 

FR 210 — Introduction to French Literature, II or equivalent 

Four courses in French language and linguistics including FR 

314 — Advanced Grammar and Style. 

Four courses in French literature: two courses in French 

literature prior to 1800, and two courses in French literature 

from 1800 to the present. 1 

Three additional courses in French civilization, French film, 

French language and linguistics, French literature, or 

francophone studies. 

Courses in other departments chosen with the approval of the 

option adviser. 

Western civilization. 2 Select from: 

HIST 110 — Composition II/Western Civilization from 
Antiquity to 1660 (or HIST 111— Western Civilization 
from Antiquity to 1660) and HIST 112— Western 
Civilization from 1660 to the Present (or HIST 113— 
Composition II/Western Civilization from 1660 to the 
Present) 
or 

C LIT 141— Masterpieces of Western Culture, I; and C LIT 
142 — Masterpieces of Western Culture, II 



1. FR 343 — Studies in French, when dealing with a literary topic, may be substituted 
for one of these courses. 

2. Other substitutions may be approved by the option adviser. 

French Commercial Studies Option 



HOURS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



12 



3 
3 
15 



6-8 



REQUIREMENTS 

FR 205 — Oral French, I or equivalent 

FR 207 — Grammar and Composition or equivalent 

FR 209 — Introduction to French Literature, I or equivalent 

FR 210 — Introduction to French Literature, II or equivalent 

Five courses in French language and linguistics, including: 

FR 314 — Advanced Grammar and Style 

FR 319 — Techniques in Translating 

FR 321 — Techniques in Translation, II 
Four courses in French civilization, French literature, or 
francophone studies 

FR 385 — Commercial and Economic French, I 
FR 386 — Commercial and Economic French, II 
Approved supporting course work in business 
administration, finance, and/or economics selected in 
consultation with the option adviser. 
Western civilization. 1 Select from: 

HIST 110 — Composition II/Western Civilization from 
Antiquity to 1660 (or HIST 111— Western Civilization 



from Antiquity to 1660) and HIST 112— Western 
Civilization from 1660 to the Present (or HIST 113— 
Composition II/Western Civilization from 1660 to the 
Present) 
or 

C LIT 141— Masterpieces of Western Culture, I; and C LIT 
142 — Masterpieces of Western Culture, II 

NOTE: Consult an adviser in this option concerning mathematics and economics 
courses appropriate for the fulfillment of LAS general education requirements. 



1. Substitutions may be approved by the option adviser. 
For AH Options: 

Twelve hours advanced-level (300- and approved 200-level) courses 
in the major must be taken on this campus. 

All foreign language requirements must be satisfied. 

A Major Plan of Study Form must be completed and submitted to the 
LAS Student Affairs Office before the end of the fifth semester (60-75 
hours). Please see your adviser. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF 
FRENCH 

E-mail: french@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_FR.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of French 

Minimum required course work normally equates to 73 hours. 

General education: See the description of the general education re- 
quirements elsewhere in this catalog. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours. Students are 
advised that additional course work is necessary to teach grades 
six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 Education 
Building for additional information. 

Departmental distinction: A student must have a minimum 3.5 cumu- 
lative grade point average, including a Satisfactory in the teaching 
practicum; complete two additional advanced-level courses in 
French or the teaching minor; complete a senior thesis (FR 292), 
and provide two letters of recommendation as evidence of excep- 
tional teaching potential. Consult the teacher education adviser for 
details. 



HOURS 

24 



HOURS 



6 

5 

49 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Professional education courses. (See the entry for Curricula 
Preparatory to Teaching Foreign Languages.) 

REQUIREMENTS 

FR 101 and 102 — Elementary French, I and II; or equivalent 

FR 133 and 134 — Accelerated Intermediate French, I and II; or 

equivalent 

FR 205 and 206— Oral French, I and II; and FR 217— Advanced 

Oral French; or equivalents 

FR 207 — Grammar and Composition, or equivalent 

FR 209 and 210 — Introduction to French Literature, I and II; or 

equivalent 

FR 275 — Developing and Implementing Communicative 

Language Teaching, or equivalent 

FR 335 and 336 — French Civilization, I and II; or equivalent 

French electives selected from among advanced-level courses 

in French civilization, language, and/or literature 

Total 1 



NOTE: French Study Abroad (FR 299) is strongly recommended. 



1. The total of 49 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through prerequisite 
credit for work equivalent to FR 101 through 104 taken in secondary school. 

MINOR IN FRENCH 

E-mail: french@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_FR.html 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

6 FR 205— Oral French, I; and FR 206— Oral French, II 

3 FR 207 — Grammar and Composition 

6 FR 209— Introduction to French Literature, I; and FR 210— 

Introduction to French Literature, II 
3 FR 335— French Civilization, I; or FR 336 — French 

Civilization, II 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



142 



21 



One other advanced (300- or approved 200-level) French 

course 

Total 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN FRENCH 

E-mail: french@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_FR.html 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. 



HOURS 

8 
8 



6 
22 



REQUIREMENTS 

FR 101 and 102 — Elementary French, I and II; or equivalent 

FR 133 and 134 — Accelerated Intermediate French, I and II; or 

equivalent 

FR 205 and 206 — Oral French, I and II; or equivalent 

Total 



Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach 
grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 
Education Building for additional information. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN GENERAL SCIENCE 1 

Teacher education minors are available only to students seeking to 
add additional teaching fields to their teaching majors. Additional 
hours in other sciences, such as astronomy, geology, and physical 
geography, are recommended for the student completing the minor in 
general science. 



HOURS 
10 



10 

8 
28 



REQUIREMENTS 

PHYCS 101— General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound), 

and PHYCS 102— General Physics (Light, Electricity, 

Magnetism, and Modern Physics) 

Principles of biology 2 

General chemistry 

Total 



Students are advised that additional course work is necessary to teach 
middle grades six through eight. Consult the certification officer in 130 
Education Building for additional information. 



1. A revision of the teacher education minor in general science was pending at the 
time of publication. 

2. Consult the certification officer in 130 Education Building for appropriate courses. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Students in geography must complete both the core courses in geog- 
raphy and one of the seven options. This major is administered by the 
Department of Geography. 

A student who elects one of the options in general human and 
physical geography, urban and social geography, historical and re- 
gional studies, or economic geography is encouraged to include 
MATH 124— Finite Mathematics and MATH 134— Calculus for Social 
Scientists, I as part of the undergraduate program. The options in 
physical environment, natural resource evaluation, and spatial graph- 
ics and analysis have specific mathematics requirements. 

MAJOR IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS CURRICULUM 

E-mail: geography@uiuc.edu 

Web address for most current program requirements: 
http://kingbird.las.uiuc.edu/las/p_GEOG.html 

Degree title: Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Minimum required major and supporting course work normally 
equates to 42-57 hours including at least 30 hours of Geography 
courses. 

General education: The LAS General Education requirements are set 
up so students automatically complete the Campus General Edu- 
cation requirements. 

Minimum hours required for graduation: 120 hours 

Departmental distinction. All students majoring in geography who 
have maintained a University grade point average of 3.25 and who 
satisfactorily complete an independent project (GEOG 291) in their 
senior year will be eligible to graduate with distinction in geogra- 
phy. Students should consult their advisers about distinction 
requirements as soon as they enter the major (no later than the end 
of their junior year). 



Students must complete the core requirements listed below and select 
one option in consultation with an academic adviser. 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

11-12 Three introductory geography courses: 

Select one physical geography course: 
GEOG 102— Weather and Climate 
GEOG 103 — Earth's Physical Systems and Human 
Geography 
Select one human geography course: 

GEOG 101 — Geography of Developing Countries 
GEOG 104 — Social and Cultural Geography 
GEOG 205 — Business Location Decision Making: Theory 
and Practice 
Select one additional course from physical or human 
geography 
4 GEOG 271— Spatial Analysis 

15-16 Required total core hours 

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect GEOG 373 — Map Compilation and 
Construction. Students are encouraged to elect techniques courses as part of their 
programs. Techniques courses include: 

GEOG 185 — Introduction to Social Statistics 

GEOG 273 — Spring Field Course 

GEOG 277 — Interpretation of Aerial Photographs 

GEOG 290 — Individual Study (Spatial Programming) 

GEOG 370 — Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Geography 

GEOG 373 — Map Compilation and Construction 

GEOG 377 — Introduction to Remote Sensing 

GEOG 378 — Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis 

General Human and Physical Geography Option 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

Geography courses, selected from 200- and 300-level courses, 
excluding GEOG 210, in: 

6 Physical geography 

6 Human geography 

3 Geography course selected in consultation with an adviser 

12 Supporting courses chosen in consultation with the adviser, 

from the following: agronomy, agricultural economics, 
anthropology, atmospheric sciences, civil engineering, 
forestry, geology, history, landscape architecture, life 
sciences, political science, psychology, sociology, urban and 
regional planning 

NOTE: Students must complete at least 40 hours in the major including core courses. 

Urban and Social Geography Option 

HOURS REQUIREMENTS 

12 Geography courses chosen from: 

GEOG 110 — Geography of International Conflicts 

GEOG 204— Cities of the World 

GEOG 205 — Business Location Decision-Making: Theory 

and Practice 
GEOG 284— Population Geography 
GEOG 290— Individual Study 
GE